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  1. 1
    372761

    Evaluation of the UNFPA support to family planning 2008-2013. Volume 1.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, Evaluation Office, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], 2016 Apr. 105 p.

    The purpose of the evaluation was to assess the performance of UNFPA in the field of family planning during the period covered by the Strategic Plan 2008-2013 and to provide learning to inform the implementation of the current UNFPA Family Planning Strategy Choices not chance (2012-2020). The evaluation provided an overall independent assessment of UNFPA interventions in the area of family planning and identified key lessons learned for the current and future strategies. The particular emphasis of this evaluation was on learning with a view to informing the implementation of the UNFPA family planning strategy Choices not chance 2012-2020, as well as other related interventions and programmes, such as the Global Programme to Enhance Reproductive Health Commodity Security (GPRHCS- 2013-2020). The evaluation constituted an important contribution to the mid-term review of UNFPA strategic plan 2014-2017. The evaluation features five country case study reports: Bolivia, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Ethiopia, and Zimbabwe.
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  2. 2
    333332

    Global Plan towards the Elimination of New HIV Infections among Children by 2015 and Keeping their Mothers Alive. 2011-2015.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2011. [48] p. (UNAIDS/ JC2137E)

    This Global Plan provides the foundation for country-led movement towards the elimination of new HIV infections among children and keeping their mothers alive. The Global Plan was developed through a consultative process by a high level Global Task Team convened by UNAIDS. It brought together 25 countries and 30 civil society, private sector, networks of people living with HIV and international organizations to chart a roadmap to achieving this goal by 2015.
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  3. 3
    075934

    Global population assistance report, 1982-1990.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], 1992 Apr 1. v, 102 p.

    The global population assistance report for the UN Population Fund (UNFPA), 1982-90, provides background on development activities, the levels and trends in international assistance, current commitments, expenditures, types of programs funded, and future resource requirements. Numerous tables, maps, and figures in the appendix provide information on commitments and expenditures by country and region historically. The report highlights the following: 1) a record high for grants totaling US$801.8 million, 2) an increase of 12% from 1989 to 1990 in commitments, 3) the US, Japan, Norway, Germany, Canada, Sweden, the United Kingdom, Netherlands, Finland, and Denmark as donors comprising 96% of commitments all increasing contributions, 4) the World Bank increasing its loan agreement from US$125 to US$169 million between 1989-90, 5) donors commiting aid in roughly equal proportions: 30% to bilateral aid, 34% to UN agencies, and 35% to nongovernmental organizations, 6) the donor contributions of population assistance as a % of Official Development Assistance dropping from 1.21% to 1.18% between 1989-90, 7) and US$9 billion/year being required in order to meet the medium projection target in 2000. Expenditure increased in Africa from US$128 to US$153 from 1989 to 1990. Stable expenditures amounted to US$208 million in Asia and the Pacific, US$92 million in Latin America and the Caribbean, and US$52 million in the Middle East and north Africa. The use of multiple channels of support means the distribution of assistance is adapted to local conditions. 66% of all exenditures go toward family planning services, 15% for information, education, and communication, and 5% for basic data collection.
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  4. 4
    271242

    World wide report on A.I.D. and IPPF funded population activities, FY 1987-FY 1988.

    United States. Agency for International Development [USAID]. Office of Population; John Snow [JSI]. Family Planning Logistics Management Project

    Boston, Massachusetts, John Snow, Inc., 1989 Jan. 222 p. (Population Projects Database)

    This issue of the semi-annual Population Project Database Report contains short narrative summaries describing AID-funded population and family planning subprojects primarily as a management toil for the Office of Population; however, it may be useful for the entire international population community. The introduction begins with a discussion of AID population assistance -- how the funds are administered, where the support for activities comes from, and what types of projects are supported by AID's grants and contracts. The 1987 expenditures and 1988 commitments by cooperating agencies for in-country subproject activities are presented followed by a summary of AID subproject activities. This FY1987-FY1988 report includes information on 2,070 AID subproject activities in 94 countries. Of these, 30% concentrate on family planning service delivery, 24% on training-oriented activities, and 17% emphasize research to develop improved contraceptive methods. An additional 8% focus on education, information and communications with regard to family planning, and 7% are primarily concerned with operations research aimed at developing improved ways to deliver family planning services in developing countries. The data in this report were assembled from the Population Projects Database (PPD), a computer-based information system for the Agency for international Development. The bulk of the report is presented in tables which detail AID and IPPF funded population activities in FY1987 and FY1988 by cooperating agency, country and the following regions: Africa, Asia/Near East, Latin America/Caribbean, US/Canada, Europe/Australia, and inter regional. New charts showing the number and types of subproject activities in each region are also include.
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  5. 5
    051355

    1987 report by the Executive Director of the United Nations Population Fund. State of world population 1988. UNFPA in 1987.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 1988. 189 p.

    Of major significance to the United Nations Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA) in 1987 was the fact that the world's population passed the 5 billion mark in that year. Although population growth rates are now slowing, the momentum of population growth ensures that at least another 3 billion people will be added to the world between 1985-2025. This increasing population pressure dictates a need for development policies that sustain and expand the earth's resource base rather than deplete it. Successful adaptation will require political commitment and significant investments of national resources, both human and financial. It is especially important to extend the reach of family planning programs so that women can delay the 1st birth and extend the intervals between subsequent births. Nearly all developing countries now have family planning programs, but the degree of political and economic support, and their effective reach, vary widely. In 1987, UNFPA assistance in this area totalled US$73.3 million, or 55% of total program allocations. During this year, UNFPA supported nearly 500 country and intercountry family planning projects, with particular attention to improving maternal-child health/family planning services in sub-Saharan Africa. As more governments in Africa became involved in Family planning programs, there was a concomitant need for all types of training programs. Other special program interests during 1987 included women and development, youth, aging, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). This Annual Report includes detailed accounts of UNFPA program activities in 1987 in sub-Saharan Africa, Arab States and Europe, Asia and the Pacific, and Latin America and the Caribbean. Also included are reports on policy and program coordination, staff training and development, evaluation, technical cooperation among developing countries, procurement of supplies and equipment, multibilateral financing for population activities, and income and expenditures.
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  6. 6
    270580

    Worldwide reports on A.I.D. population programs, FY 1987.

    John Snow [JSI]. Family Planning Logistics Management Project

    Boston, Massachusetts, John Snow, Inc., 1988 Mar. 33 p. (Population Projects Database)

    This document contains, in looseleaf format, reports generated from the Office of Population's Population Projects Database (PPD) which is now maintained by John Snow's (JSI) Family Planning Logistics Management Project. JSI will issue "The Woldwide Report on A.I.D. and IPPF Funded Population Activities," also known as the "Subproject Activities Report," on a semi-annual basis. The fiscal year (FY) 1986 to FY 1987 is now available. Issued on an annual basis will be "The Country Funding Attribution Report"; the report for FY 1987 is included in the binder under the heading: CA Cost Report. Also provided is a list of current contracts, an acronym list, and an instruction manual for filling in the questionnaire on which the porject reports are based. A blank section is also provided for any special reports requested by the user from the Population Projects Database. Using the subproject activities report and the CA Cost Report together provides a full picture of population activities worldwide. Both reports are organized by country and both attempt to capture actual expenditures in prior years and expected expenditures in the current and future years. The reports differ in the following ways: the Subproject Activities Report focuses on in-country activities, including those carried out by A.I.D. Missions and Regional Bureaus, Cooperating Agencies and the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF). It includes activities covered under host country contracts, but does not include certain US-based activities of Cooperating Agencies which support the Office of Population programs or those contracts that provide support solely in the form of technical assistance. Both descriptive and financial information is provided. The CA Cost Reports covers all contracts issued directly to Cooperating Agencies by the Office of Population as well as Mission "buy-ins" to those contracts. It does not cover other activities of A.I.D. Missions and Regional Bureaus, host country contract or activities of other international agencies. It is purely a financial report and focuses on the way total contract expenditures have been allocated among various cost categories. Both reports are prepared in tabular format. The PPD, wich was started in 1983, includes information on more than 2400 population assistance project activies funded by A.I.D. in over 100 countries; it also includes 600 projects funded by the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) and about 100 projects fund by IPPF. Reports on specific topics can be requested from JSI.
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  7. 7
    260467

    Assistance to fertility regulation projects within the United Nations system.

    SOM RK

    Population Bulletin of the United Nations. 1977; 10:36-62.

    A review was undertaken to summarize information on the amount of technical assistance provided within the U.N. system to fertility regulation projects through 1976. Projects funded by the U.N. Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA) included family planning delivery systems, which received an average of 71% of all funding for fertility regulation; and program development for family planning, which received 7% of this funding. Total assistance granted by UNFPA to fertility regulation projects increased from $4.6 million before 1972 to $43.2 million in 1976. The amount given to fertility regulation relative to the amount given to other population projects averaged 49% for the period and 53% in 1976. Assistance to country fertility projects consistently increased from 60% before 1972 to 87% in 1976. However, assistance to regional projects declined from 18% before 1972 to 5% in 1976. The World Bank and its affiliate, the International Development Association (IDA) had loaned a total of $134.5 million to 12 different countries by the end of 1976. These loans financed construction, vehicles, furniture and equipment as well as training, demographic research and assessment, management and other technical assistance to fertility regulation programs. Anticipated improvements in the range and standardization of data should permit future reviews to provide more detailed analysis dealing with additional aspects of the assistance given to fertility regulation projects.
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