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  1. 1
    142941

    Visualize world population education.

    Ramirez E

    EDUCATOR'S UPDATE. 1999 Jun; 3(6):1-3.

    The author visited Asia as an Affiliate International Intern during January-February 1999. His experience working with the Bangkok regional office of Planned Parenthood Federation of America's (PPFA) Family Planning International Assistance (FPIA) and family planning projects in the Philippines and Bangladesh showed him how Planned Parenthood affiliates need to increase their commitment to international family planning. Planned Parenthood's education departments can play a major role toward that end. The 3 FPIA projects in Manila provide outreach, sexuality education, and the community-based distribution of contraceptives in very poor areas. They target youths involved in or at risk of becoming involved in prostitution. Barriers to effective outreach are largely organizational, and not in the field. Increasing outreach worker training and continuing education, organizational support strategies, and new outreach strategies were discussed with project staff. 4 days of training were subsequently conducted with project staff on educational/therapeutic encounters regarding sexuality. The author also worked with the FPIA regional office staff in Bangkok and the Bangladesh Association for the Prevention of Septic Abortion in Dhaka.
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  2. 2
    139161

    IPPF takes on the challenges for ICPD + 5.

    JOICFP NEWS. 1999 Jan; (295):1.

    The 1994 International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD), held in Cairo and attended by 80 government delegations, opened the door to a new phase of cooperation between government organizations (GOs) and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). A strong partner at Cairo, the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) had its Vision 2000 Strategic Plan incorporated into the ICPD Program of Action. Participants at the ICPD+5 conference, to be held in the Hague in 1999, will review what has happened since the original ICPD in 1994. IPPF, the largest NGO in reproductive health and family planning (RH/FP), will be a voice for NGOs and participate in monitoring at ICPD+5. IPPF has encouraged countries to establish national focal points on RH/FP and is now working through a monthly newsletter to keep family planning associations (FPAs), women's unions, and youth groups informed. IPPF is also participating in roundtables with UNFPA and other organizations, as well as with the UN Population Division. The recent and ongoing shift away from core funding to project-specific funding has weakened the structure of existing FPAs. Strengthening the implementation of Vision 2000 is discussed. Japan has consistently been an active partner, supporting IPPF and FPAs in many countries.
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  3. 3
    119450

    The darker side of choice. Newspaper report.

    Geloo Z

    In: Report on International Public Hearing on Crimes Against Women Related to Population Policies, Cairo, Egypt, September, 1994, organised by: UBINIG and Asian Women Human Rights Council [AWHRC]. Manila, Philippines, AWHRC, 1994. 36-7.

    The story is told of a government family planning worker who persuaded a Bangladeshi woman in 1988 to accept sterilization in exchange for coupons for rice and wheat and money to build a small house. The woman has since been rejected by her husband and in-laws, is often sick, has no strength to work, and never received her coupons for rice and wheat. This woman testified, along with many others, at the Nongovernmental Organization (NGO) Forum public hearing on crimes against women related to population policies. The jury consisted of women from the Asian Women's Human Rights Council and UBINIG, a Dhaka-based radical feminist group. Women are arguing that the administration of family planning programs violates their inner core. In particular, developing countries with large and growing populations are eager to comply with donors, and will implement aggressive family planning campaigns which fail to respect women's rights to choose.
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  4. 4
    119451

    Best laid family plans sometimes go awry. Newspaper report.

    Stackhouse J

    In: Report on International Public Hearing on Crimes Against Women Related to Population Policies, Cairo, Egypt, September, 1994, organised by: UBINIG and Asian Women Human Rights Council [AWHRC]. Manila, Philippines, AWHRC, 1994. 33-4.

    The story is told of a government family planning worker who persuaded a Bangladeshi woman to accept sterilization in exchange for food, housing material, and US$4.50. A conference of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) was held parallel to the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) during which participants argued that family planning programs have simply promoted unsafe contraceptive methods for women. The director of UBINIG, a Dhaka-based radical feminist group, argued at the meeting that aid agencies and governments allow women to suffer serious side effects in the name of stabilizing world population growth, while men are asked to do nothing to reduce fertility. Aid donors who support Bangladesh's family planning program counter that acceptance is voluntary and that it has sharply reduced birth rates, while many development agencies argue that contraceptives help millions of women by preventing them from bearing too many children. Many feminist NGOs nonetheless believe that women have little choice against government targets and incentive programs for health care workers. Several instances were cited at the NGO forum of what were described as unsafe contraception measures.
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  5. 5
    099808

    Despite moral dilemmas at the heart of the ICPD, "consensus" is achieved.

    FAMILY PLANNING NEWS. 1994; 10(2):5.

    Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto of Pakistan, while noting her desire for all pregnancies to one day be planned and all children loved, publicly rejected abortion at the 1994 UN International Conference on Population and Development as a method of family planning. She stressed that serious flaws exist in the draft program of action and reaffirmed the Islamic principle of the sanctity of life and the emphasis of the family unit. Pakistan will be guided in its policies by the laws of Islam even though family planning is now being encouraged in the country. Norway's Prime Minister Gro Brundtland, a practicing doctor for 10 years, however, was more realistic on abortion. Women abort unwanted fetuses the world over through whatever means available and regardless of the legality of the procedure. Antiabortion legislation makes many of these abortions highly unsafe for the pregnant women. Prime Minister Brundtland called upon the leaders of all countries to provide legal and safe abortion services to women in need. After abortion became legal in Norway, the number of abortions remained the same and the country now has one of the lowest such rates in the world. Contrary to the claims of conservative and uninformed detractors in some countries, sex education does not promote promiscuity, but helps reduce levels of fertility. Brundtland pointed to the successes of programs in Thailand, Indonesia, and Italy as evidence. In Norway, sex education also promotes responsible sexual behavior and even abstinence. Finally, Prime Minister Brundtland encouraged governments to allocate much more of their budgets to family planning programs. Norway in 1991 allocated 4.55% of its official development assistance to family planning, the only country to surpass the 4% level in this area.
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  6. 6
    271242

    World wide report on A.I.D. and IPPF funded population activities, FY 1987-FY 1988.

    United States. Agency for International Development [USAID]. Office of Population; John Snow [JSI]. Family Planning Logistics Management Project

    Boston, Massachusetts, John Snow, Inc., 1989 Jan. 222 p. (Population Projects Database)

    This issue of the semi-annual Population Project Database Report contains short narrative summaries describing AID-funded population and family planning subprojects primarily as a management toil for the Office of Population; however, it may be useful for the entire international population community. The introduction begins with a discussion of AID population assistance -- how the funds are administered, where the support for activities comes from, and what types of projects are supported by AID's grants and contracts. The 1987 expenditures and 1988 commitments by cooperating agencies for in-country subproject activities are presented followed by a summary of AID subproject activities. This FY1987-FY1988 report includes information on 2,070 AID subproject activities in 94 countries. Of these, 30% concentrate on family planning service delivery, 24% on training-oriented activities, and 17% emphasize research to develop improved contraceptive methods. An additional 8% focus on education, information and communications with regard to family planning, and 7% are primarily concerned with operations research aimed at developing improved ways to deliver family planning services in developing countries. The data in this report were assembled from the Population Projects Database (PPD), a computer-based information system for the Agency for international Development. The bulk of the report is presented in tables which detail AID and IPPF funded population activities in FY1987 and FY1988 by cooperating agency, country and the following regions: Africa, Asia/Near East, Latin America/Caribbean, US/Canada, Europe/Australia, and inter regional. New charts showing the number and types of subproject activities in each region are also include.
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  7. 7
    270580

    Worldwide reports on A.I.D. population programs, FY 1987.

    John Snow [JSI]. Family Planning Logistics Management Project

    Boston, Massachusetts, John Snow, Inc., 1988 Mar. 33 p. (Population Projects Database)

    This document contains, in looseleaf format, reports generated from the Office of Population's Population Projects Database (PPD) which is now maintained by John Snow's (JSI) Family Planning Logistics Management Project. JSI will issue "The Woldwide Report on A.I.D. and IPPF Funded Population Activities," also known as the "Subproject Activities Report," on a semi-annual basis. The fiscal year (FY) 1986 to FY 1987 is now available. Issued on an annual basis will be "The Country Funding Attribution Report"; the report for FY 1987 is included in the binder under the heading: CA Cost Report. Also provided is a list of current contracts, an acronym list, and an instruction manual for filling in the questionnaire on which the porject reports are based. A blank section is also provided for any special reports requested by the user from the Population Projects Database. Using the subproject activities report and the CA Cost Report together provides a full picture of population activities worldwide. Both reports are organized by country and both attempt to capture actual expenditures in prior years and expected expenditures in the current and future years. The reports differ in the following ways: the Subproject Activities Report focuses on in-country activities, including those carried out by A.I.D. Missions and Regional Bureaus, Cooperating Agencies and the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF). It includes activities covered under host country contracts, but does not include certain US-based activities of Cooperating Agencies which support the Office of Population programs or those contracts that provide support solely in the form of technical assistance. Both descriptive and financial information is provided. The CA Cost Reports covers all contracts issued directly to Cooperating Agencies by the Office of Population as well as Mission "buy-ins" to those contracts. It does not cover other activities of A.I.D. Missions and Regional Bureaus, host country contract or activities of other international agencies. It is purely a financial report and focuses on the way total contract expenditures have been allocated among various cost categories. Both reports are prepared in tabular format. The PPD, wich was started in 1983, includes information on more than 2400 population assistance project activies funded by A.I.D. in over 100 countries; it also includes 600 projects funded by the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) and about 100 projects fund by IPPF. Reports on specific topics can be requested from JSI.
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  8. 8
    109688

    Employment-based family planning programs. L'emploi et le planning familial.

    Rinehart W; Blackburn R; Moore SH

    Population Reports. Series J: Family Planning Programs. 1987 Sept-Oct; (34):921-51.

    Family planning services through the workplace is an idea that is attracting more attention, benefit's workers, employers, and nations. Large manufacturers and plantations in India first offered family planning to workers in the 1950s. Now also in Indonesia, the Philippines, Thailand, South Korea, Turkey, Egypt, Kenya, and elsewhere, many large companies have added family planning to other health services. In some Latin American countries social security systems have added family planning for many workers. Many different groups, including compaines, labor unions, government-sponsored social marketing programs, and the military, run employment-based programs. Services are offered in workplace clinics, through referrals, in free-standing facilities, in social security hospitals, and in community clinics. Funding comes from employers, governments, unions, family planning associations, and USAID. The most effective programs offer supplies and services as well as information, offer them directly at the workplace, and use worker-volunteers to distribute pills and condoms. Successful programs require the full support of company management. Favorable cost-benefit projections can show managers that offering family planning makes financial sense and contributes to employee health.
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  9. 9
    051486

    Financial resources for maternal/child health and family planning: a global review.

    Maine D; Wray J; Wallace M; Belsey M

    [Unpublished] 1984. Paper presented at the NCIH 11th Annual International Health Conference, Arlington, Virginia, Jun 11-13, 1984. 19 p. (NCIH 11th Annual International Health Conference Paper)

    This article discusses the relative merits of various maternal and child health interventions and programs. The Center for Population and Family Health (CPFH) has been studying international resources for maternal and child health (MCH), including family planning (FP) at the request of the Maternal and Child Health Program of the World Health Organization. A questionnaire was sent to 100s of donor agencies, including multilateral, bilateral and governmental agencies (NGOs). Data were obtained from the Development Assistance Committee (DAC) of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development which collects information on development cooperation from 17 developed countries. Despite its limitations, this study indicates important program implications. Over US$37 billion in official (government) development funds were disbursed in 1981, 73% of which came from DAC members. Of DAC members, the United States provides the largest amount of official development funding (US$5.8 billion in 1981). Nongovernmental funds for 1981 are estimated to be over US$2 billion. 6% of bilateral commitments for funding from DAC countries were for health in 1981, amounting to US$1.3 billion. The median allocations of funding to the sectors and programs of interest in various geographical regions are shown, indicating that in African countries a much smaller proportion of total development funding is allocated to health and population than in Asia or Latin America. Overall, about 10% of the reported international funding was allocated to health and population. In the last year or 2 numerous family planning projects (often integrated with health services) have been initiated in Africa. More money is available per eligible person in Africa than in other regions both for health and population services and for MCH/FP services because African countries have small populations compared to those in Asia and Latin America. For all regions, the US$s/per person eligible for services is very low. Only for all health and population services in Africa is there over US$1 available per person. In recent years a large proportion of agencies have increased funding of MCH/FP. 46 of 53 agencies indicated they would consider increasing funding. The priority of possible services should be considered carefully if they are to reach the vast number of women and children needing services in developing countries.
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  10. 10
    016499

    Health for all by year 2000.

    Jones L

    Populi. 1983; 10(1):78-81.

    The World Health Organization's (WHO) aim is to achieve a level of health that will allow all the world's citizens to lead a socially and economically productive life by the year 2000. Peter D. O'Neill's book, "Health Crisis 2000," is based on WHO's European regional strategy for attaining "health for all" by the year 2000. Its goal is to enable a large audience to participate in a dialogue on the real issues. An analysis of trends in health and disease, made over the past 3 years by representatives of the medical profession, has produced ominous signs that current health policies have set a dangerous course. If "health for all" is to be realized by the year 2000, it will be necessary to implement a new strategy with 3 inseparable themes, i.e., health as a way of life, the prevention of ill health, and community care for all. While the book analyzes the 1st stage of work which the WHO European Region has drawn up for itself, it interprets the official strategy document and offers ample detail to draw ministers, parliamentarians, industrialists, and the media into the debate. Fakhruddin Iqbal reports that a recent study suggests that the Bangladesh family planning program neglected to consider age old social and cultural values. The study identifies 2 distinct cultural values that present obstacles to the program: the traditional preferences for age old treatment as opposed to modern medical practices and the persistent tradition of relegating women to the lowest rung of mass education; and the traditional family size perceptions of the people. Andrew Hamilton writes that the Jamaica Family Planning Association has employed 7 people to spread knowledge of family life education and family planning among youth. These 18-23 year old youth associates are part of a major national drive to keep Jamaica's population below 3 million by the year 2000. About traditional midwives Jan Steele writes that they deliver between 60-80% of babies in the developing world each year and provide support and care in environments commonly shunned by the medical profession. The IPS reports that according to the 1980 census the population of Brazil is 120 million. If the current demographic trends continue, the population will double by 2014. With the present unemployment level, there will be 41.5 million people underemployed and 15 million unemployed in 2014. Meena Panday writes that Nepal cannot seem to get its population program going. The Population Council reports that no evidence exists as yet that use of the copper bearing or nonmedicated IUD increases the risk of ectopic pregnancy.
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