Your search found 232 Results

  1. 1
    374444

    Hormonal contraception: recommendations for women at high risk of HIV.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]

    [London, United Kingdom, IPPF], 2017 Jun. 3 p.

    The World Health Organization (WHO) issued revised guidance on the eligibility criteria for hormonal contraceptive use among women at high risk of acquiring HIV in March 2017. This update is critically important for women’s health, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa where HIV prevalence is high and injectable contraception is widely used.
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  2. 2
    332087

    Training and reference guide for a screening checklist to initiate use of the copper IUD. Second edition.

    Mueller MP; Lasway C; Yacobson I; Tumlinson K

    Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, Family Health International [FHI], 2009. 79 p. (USAID Cooperative Agreement No. GPO-A-00-05-00022-00)

    This training and reference guide was developed for family planning service providers interested in using the Checklist for Screening Clients Who Want to Initiate Use of the Copper IUD, commonly referred to as the "IUD Checklist." Designed to serve as both a training and reference tool, the guide is composed of two parts: a training module and a collection of essential, up-to-date reference materials on the copper intrauterine device (IUD). This guide is part of a series to train on other checklists. The IUD Checklist was developed to assist service providers in screening clients who have already been counseled about contraceptive options and who have made an informed decision to use the copper IUD. This simple job aid is based on the technical guidance provided by the World Health Organization (WHO) in its Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use (2004, updated 2008). The checklist supports the application of these guidelines -- known as the WHO MEC -- into service delivery practice. (Excerpts)
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  3. 3
    332085

    Training and reference guide for a screening checklist to initiate use of DMPA (or NET-EN). Second edition.

    Mueller MP; Lasway C; Yacobson I; Tumlinson K

    Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, Family Health International [FHI], 2009. 79 p. (USAID Cooperative Agreement No. GPO-A-00-05-00022-00)

    This training and reference guide was developed for family planning service providers interested in using the Checklist for Screening Clients Who Want to Initiate DMPA (or NET-EN), commonly referred to as the "DMPA Checklist". Designed to serve as both a training and reference tool, the guide is composed of two parts: a training module and a collection of essential, up-to-date reference materials. The guide is part of a series to train on other checklists. The DMPA Checklist was developed to assist service providers in screening clients who have already been counseled about contraceptive options and who have made an informed decision to use either of two popular injectable contraceptive methods: depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) or norethisterone enantate (NET-EN). This simple job aid is based on the technical guidance provided by the World Health Organization (WHO) in its Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use (2004, updated 2008). The checklist supports the application of these guidelines -- known as the WHO MEC -- into service delivery practice. (Excerpts)
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  4. 4
    332084

    Training and reference guide for a screening checklist to initiate use of COCs. Second edition.

    Mueller MP; Lasway C; Yacobson I; Tumlinson K

    Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, Family Health International [FHI], 2009. 75 p. (USAID Cooperative Agreement No. GPO-A-00-05-00022-00)

    This training and reference guide was developed for family planning service providers interested in using the Checklist for Screening Clients Who Want to Initiate Combined Oral Contraceptives, commonly referred to as the "COC Checklist." Designed to serve as both a training and reference tool, the guide is composed of two parts: a training module and a collection of essential, up-to-date reference materials on combined oral contraceptives. This guide is part of a series to train on other checklists. The COC Checklist was developed to assist service providers in screening clients who have already been counseled about contraceptive options and who have made an informed decision to use combined oral contraceptives (COCs). This simple job aid is based on the technical guidance provided by the World Health Organization (WHO) in its Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use (2004, updated 2008). The checklist supports the application of these guidelines -- known as the WHO MEC -- into service delivery practice.. (Excerpts)
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  5. 5
    331627

    Developing and testing strategies for increasing awareness of the IUDas a contraceptive option.

    Vernon R; Khan ME; Birungi H; Askew I; Stones W

    [Washington, D.C.], Population Council, Frontiers in Reproductive Health, 2007 Dec. 21 p. (USAID Cooperative Agreement No. HRN-A-00-98-00012-00)

    Much of the programmatic and research experience gained over the past two decades has focused on increasing understanding of supply-side factors that limit the provision and use of the IUD, for example, developing training programs, demonstrating the ability of lower level medical staff to provide the method, and assessing the interaction between IUDs, STIs and, more recently, HIV. There is now sufficient empirical evidence from a range of settings to allow program managers and technical assistance organizations to develop guidelines and plans for strengthening the systems necessary to support country-level introduction or 'rehabilitation'; of the IUD within a program offering a range of contraceptive choices. The objectives were: To conduct a meeting of researchers and program managers from three continents and several international organizations to review reasons for under-utilization of the IUD and recent experiences in increasing awareness about the IUD; To develop proposals for operations research projects to test the most promising interventions to introduce and expand access to IUD services and to implement the projects with national partner organizations; To disseminate results of the successful strategies. (Excerpts]
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  6. 6
    328129

    [Family planning: a global handbook for providers. Evidence-based guidance developed through worldwide collaboration]

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Reproductive Health and Research; Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Center for Communication Programs. Information and Knowledge for Optimal Health [INFO]

    Baltimore, Maryland, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Center for Communication Programs, 2008. [489] p. (WHO Family Planning Cornerstone)

    This new handbook on family planning methods and related topics is the first of its kind. Through an organized, collaborative process, experts from around the world have come to consensus on practical guidance that reflects the best available scientific evidence. The World Health Organization (WHO) convened this process. Many major technical assistance and professional organizations have endorsed and adopted this guidance. This book serves as a quick-reference resource for all levels of health care workers. It is the successor to The Essentials of Contraceptive Technology, first published in 1997 by the Center for Communication Programs at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. In format and organization it resembles the earlier handbook. At the same time, all of the content of Essentials has been re-examined, new evidence has been gathered, guidance has been revised where needed, and gaps have been filled. This handbook reflects the family planning guidance developed by WHO. Also, this book expands on the coverage of Essentials: It addresses briefly other needs of clients that come up in the course of providing family planning. (excerpt)
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  7. 7
    323078

    [Family planning: a global handbook for providers. Evidence-based guidance developed through worldwide collaboration] Planificacion familiar: un manual mundial para proveedores. Orientacion basada en la evidencia desarrollada gracias a la colaboracion mundial.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Reproductive Health and Research; Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Center for Communication Programs. Information and Knowledge for Optimal Health [INFO]

    Baltimore, Maryland, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Center for Communication Programs, 2007. [383] p. (WHO Family Planning Cornerstone)

    This new handbook on family planning methods and related topics is the first of its kind. Through an organized, collaborative process, experts from around the world have come to consensus on practical guidance that reflects the best available scientific evidence. The World Health Organization (WHO) convened this process. Many major technical assistance and professional organizations have endorsed and adopted this guidance. This book serves as a quick-reference resource for all levels of health care workers. It is the successor to The Essentials of Contraceptive Technology, first published in 1997 by the Center for Communication Programs at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. In format and organization it resembles the earlier handbook. At the same time, all of the content of Essentials has been re-examined, new evidence has been gathered, guidance has been revised where needed, and gaps have been filled. This handbook reflects the family planning guidance developed by WHO. Also, this book addresses briefly other needs of clients that come up in the course of providing family planning. (excerpt)
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  8. 8
    315301

    Family planning: a global handbook for providers. Evidence-based guidance developed through worldwide collaboration.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Reproductive Health and Research; Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Center for Communication Programs. Information and Knowledge for Optimal Health [INFO]

    Baltimore, Maryland, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Center for Communication Programs, 2007. [383] p. (WHO Family Planning Cornerstone)

    This new handbook on family planning methods and related topics is the first of its kind. Through an organized, collaborative process, experts from around the world have come to consensus on practical guidance that reflects the best available scientific evidence. The World Health Organization (WHO) convened this process. Many major technical assistance and professional organizations have endorsed and adopted this guidance. This book serves as a quick-reference resource for all levels of health care workers. It is the successor to The Essentials of Contraceptive Technology, first published in 1997 by the Center for Communication Programs at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. In format and organization it resembles the earlier handbook. At the same time, all of the content of Essentials has been re-examined, new evidence has been gathered, guidance has been revised where needed, and gaps have been filled. This handbook reflects the family planning guidance developed by WHO. Also, this book expands on the coverage of Essentials: It addresses briefly other needs of clients that come up in the course of providing family planning. (excerpt)
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  9. 9
    314779

    IUD logistics fact sheet.

    John Snow [JSI]. DELIVER

    [Arlington, Virginia], JSI, DELIVER, 2006 Feb. [2] p. (USAID Contract No. HRN-C-00-00-00010-00; USAID Development Experience Clearinghouse DocID / Order No. PN-ADI-092)

    For individually packaged devices, the expiration date on package refers to sterility of product, assuming packaging is not damaged. IUDs should be protected from heat and direct sunlight. Any break or perforation of sterile package makes the product nonsterile. Copper IUDs sometimes tarnish; copper tarnish does not affect IUD efficacy or safety and does not indicate that the package seal has been broken. Shelf life should not be confused with use life; for example, FEI Products Inc. Copper T 380As inserted at any time during their shelf life (7 years from date of manufacture) have a use life that is at least 12 years from the date of insertion. Because different brands may have different insertion instructions, it is essential that all devices be clearly labeled. (excerpt)
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  10. 10
    309779

    Colombia: Offering expertise to a sister organization in Ethiopia, Part 2.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]. Western Hemisphere Region [WHR]

    Notes from the Field. 2001 Sep; (9):[2] p..

    Representatives from the Asociación Pro-Bienestar de la Familia Colombiana (PROFAMILIA) in Colombia visited the Family Guidance Association of Ethiopia (FGAE) in the second half of a technical assistance exchange project. FGAE is expanding its institutional focus from family planning to sexual and reproductive health with a special emphasis on young people. Representatives from the Family Guidance Association of Ethiopia (FGAE) and the IPPF Africa Regional Office visited PROFAMILIA/Colombia in March 2001 to see PROFAMILIA's youth programs and services first-hand. The exchange was the first half of a technical assistance project that is funded by the IPPF "i3" Youth Program (Innovate, Indicate, Inform). IPPF/WHR had identified PROFAMILIA as a "best practices" FPA which could offer its expertise in developing youth programs to the FPA in Ethiopia. Zhenja, the IPPF/WHR Communications Manager, was there to facilitate the visit and identify needs for technical assistance. (excerpt)
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  11. 11
    309778

    China: Helping the People's Republic of China introduce a gender perspective in its 'reoriented' family planning program.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]. Western Hemisphere Region [WHR]

    Notes from the Field. 2001 Aug; (8):[2] p..

    International Planned Parenthood Federation, Western Hemisphere Region staff traveled to China to provide technical assistance to the Ford Foundation project "Gender Perspective in Quality of Care in Family Planning." They reviewed some basic concepts of gender and quality, and then examined the six instruments in the manual that is being adapted for China. In July 2001, Judith H., director of IPPF/WHR's Sexual and Reproductive Health Unit, visited with members of the China Population Information and Research Center and the All-China Women's Federation in Beijing to provide technical assistance to the Ford Foundation-supported project, "Gender Perspective in Quality of Care in Family Planning." (excerpt)
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  12. 12
    309776

    Belize: Efficient services with a human face.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]. Western Hemisphere Region [WHR]

    Notes from the Field. 2001 Jul; (6):[2] p..

    International Planned Parenthood Federation, Western Hemisphere Region staff visited Belize in June 2001 to work with the Belize Family Life Association (BFLA) on sustainability and management aspects of its strategic plan for sexual and reproductive health care. The slogan they developed was Efficient Services with a Human Face." IPPF/WHR Senior Program Advisors Lucella and Humberto were in Belize in June 2001 to work with IPPF/WHR's affiliate there, the Belize Family Life Association (BFLA), on the sustainability and management aspects of its strategic plan. BFLA recently received a grant from the Summit Foundation to construct a new headquarters that will allow for expanded services. (excerpt)
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  13. 13
    309775

    Guatemala: Orienting affiliates on the design and implementation of a state-of-the-art management system.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]. Western Hemisphere Region [WHR]

    Notes from the Field. 2001 Jun; (5):[2] p..

    A three-person team from International Planned Parenthood Federation, Western Hemisphere Region conducted a training workshop in Guatemala for several affiliates on the design and implementation of the Integrated Management System and also received feedback on the system. A three-person team from IPPF/WHR recently conducted a training workshop in Antigua, Guatemala for several IPPF/WHR affiliates on the design and implementation of the highly anticipated Integrated Management System (IMS). The workshop was an opportunity both to orient the participants to the new system as well as to get their feedback on the IMS and the extent to which it meets their needs. WHR team members included Leslie, Director of MIS, María Cristina, Regional Supplies Officer, and Rupal, Evaluation Officer. (excerpt)
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  14. 14
    309774

    Trinidad and Guyana: Increasing sustainability by expanding services in the Caribbean.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]. Western Hemisphere Region [WHR]

    Notes from the Field. 2001 May; (4):[2] p..

    A team from International Planned Parenthood Federation, Western Hemisphere Region traveled to Trinidad to conduct a Proposal Writing Workshop for ten affiliates who have programs on HIV prevention and youth. Then they went to Guyana to provide technical assistance and training for a sustainability model. Lucella, IPPF/WHR's Senior Program Advisor for the Caribbean, was recently in Trinidad as a member of a team conducting a Proposal Writing Workshop for ten IPPF/WHR affiliates. The following week she traveled to Guyana with another team from WHR, one that provided training in the use of the S2000ä Financial Model, a cash flow forecasting tool developed by the EFS (Endowment Fund for Sustainability). (excerpt)
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  15. 15
    309773

    Colombia: Offering expertise to a sister organization in Ethiopia, Part 1.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]. Western Hemisphere Region [WHR]

    Notes from the Field. 2001 Apr; (3):[2] p..

    Representatives from the Family Guidance Association of Ethiopia (FGAE) and the International Planned Parenthood Federation, Africa Regional Office visited the Asociación Pro-Bienestar de la Familia Colombiana (PROFAMILIA) in March 2001 to see PROFAMILIA's youth programs and services. The exchange was the first half of a technical assistance project; PROFAMILIA was identified as a "best practices" organization that could offer its expertise to FGAE. Representatives from PROFAMILIA/Colombia visited the Family Guidance Association of Ethiopia (FGAE) in August 2001 for the second half of a technical assistance exchange project. The project, which in March 2001 allowed for FGAE representatives to visit Colombia, is funded by the IPPF "i3" Youth Program (Innovate, Indicate, Inform). FGAE is expanding its institutional focus from family planning to sexual and reproductive health with a special emphasis on young people. PROFAMILIA was identified as a "best practices" organization to provide technical assistance on youth programs. (excerpt)
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  16. 16
    309772

    Haiti: Development of management and logistics resources to improve quality of care.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]. Western Hemisphere Region [WHR]

    Notes from the Field. 2001 Apr; (2):[2] p..

    A four-person team from International Planned Parenthood Federation, Western Hemisphere Region visited Haiti to provide technical assistance, focusing on project management and reporting, logistics and budgeting. A four-person team from IPPF/WHR was in Haiti on March 4th - 9th to work with two of the country's largest family planning organizations, PROFAMIL and FOSREF. Team members included Eva, a Program Advisor and resource development specialist; Rebecca, an Evaluation Officer; María Cristina, the Regional Supplies Officer; and Marcos, a Financial Advisor. IPPF/WHR monitors PROFAMIL's IPPF Vision 2000 Project to improve quality of care and increase access to SRH services. On this technical assistance visit, the IPPF/WHR team focused on project management and reporting, logistics, and budgeting. (excerpt)
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  17. 17
    309766

    Ecuador: Building a health center dedicated to Ecuadorian youth.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]. Western Hemisphere Region [WHR]

    Notes from the Field. 2002 Jul; (14):[2] p..

    Alejandra, senior program officer, and Rebecca, evaluation officer, traveled to Ecuador in June 2002 to monitor the implementation of two adolescent projects funded by the Hewlett and Turner foundations. We spent the first two days of our trip in Guayaquil, where IPPF/WHR's affiliate, APROFE, has its main offices and clinics. This organization has begun providing services tailored to the needs of youth for the first time. Their idea was to build a separate space for youth with funds from the Hewlett Foundation to allow the clients to have access to health care providers who are specially trained to meet their needs as young people. It will also provide them with greater privacy. Unfortunately, there have been some construction delays for the new youth center. APROFE is therefore providing youth services in a section of the main clinic's office which has been refurbished as a youth clinic. I was struck by how friendly and colorful the office looked. There were lots of posters and signs painted by the youth. We also saw the blueprints for the youth center, which APROFE hopes to have completed by December. (excerpt)
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  18. 18
    309765

    Haiti: Improving proposal writing and evaluation skills in Haiti.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]. Western Hemisphere Region [WHR]

    Notes from the Field. 2002 Feb; (13):[2] p..

    Several NGOs and government agencies, including IPPF/WHR's affiliate PROFAMIL, are working hard to address the sexual and reproductive health needs of women, men, and youth in Haiti. Recently, IPPF/WHR has sought to support these efforts by strengthening the capacity of PROFAMIL and other agencies to develop and implement results-oriented projects that can become sustainable. A four-person team from IPPF/WHR traveled to Haiti in January 2002 to conduct a project design and proposal writing workshop with representatives from several local NGOs, including PROFAMIL, FOSREF, VDH, UNFPA, and the ministries of Health and Education. Participants came armed with statistics and other information on a specific problem that their organization would like to address, as well as intervention ideas. First, participants developed conceptual models for their project ideas; then they wrote actual proposals to seek funding. Participants used tools, such as a conceptual model and a logical framework, to assist them in the project design and proposal-writing process, with a particular emphasis on integrating monitoring and evaluation plans into their proposed interventions. (excerpt)
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  19. 19
    296569

    In Africa, hope and difficulties; training nurses in Angola and teaching young men responsible parenthood in Seychelles.

    UN Chronicle. 1987 Nov; 24(4):[3] p..

    Angola trained nurses to provide family planning services. Seychelles started a drive to educate young working people, particularly men, in responsible parenthood. Zimbabwe received a great quantity of contraceptives. All of this was accomplished in 1986 in sub-Saharan Africa with UNFPA help. Computer breakdowns slow work, but not all programmes worked equally well. Repeated computer breakdowns slowed down the Guinea census and the maternal and child health care project in Gabon was delayed by lack of equipment, staff and funds, according to UNFPA's latest annual report. Special projects for women in the region did not advance as rapidly as hoped. (excerpt)
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  20. 20
    273759

    Contraceptive procurement: a checklist of essential actions.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 1999. iv, 25 p.

    The purpose of this new guidebook is to provide a brief checklist of essential actions to help logistics managers worldwide ensure that service programmes always have adequate supplies of contraceptives and other products that they need for clients. The guidebook begins with an overview of the resupply systems that logistics managers must direct; it elaborates the actions that would ensure that each stage of the resupply process is completed before initiating actions that depend upon the completion of previous tasks; and it includes a list of the principal sources of technical information with which the logistics manager should be familiar. (excerpt)
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  21. 21
    185834

    Evaluating the impact of the UNFPA regional training program. [Évaluation de l'impact du programme de formation régional du Fonds des Nations Unies pour la Population (UNFPA)]

    Koné H

    In: Training: best practices, lessons learned and future directions. Conference program and session handouts, 22-23 May 2002, [compiled by] JHPIEGO. Baltimore, Maryland, JHPIEGO, 2002 May. 291-306. (USAID Award No. HRN-A-00-98-00041-00)

    In order to cope with the many on-job training needs of population IEC programs in Africa, the UNFPA set up in September 1994, in Abidjan, a Population & Development IEC Regional Training Program for Francophone Africa (PREFICEP). lts aim was to enable a group of nationals in each of the 26 countries (see appendix) to plan, implement and evaluate efficient and culturally-adapted IEC and Pop/FLE projects, in order to contribute to the success of post-ICPD population programs. Target groups include project managers, IEC officers, trainers, Pop/FLE curriculum and teaching material designers. Accordingly, PREFICEP used to organize regional short-term training courses in Ivory Coast. From October 1995 to December 1997, 172 people from 24 countries were trained through 8 courses (see table 1). Each course was evaluated classically: pre-test, weekly evaluation, feedback through their trainees delegates, post-test and final evaluation. The results were utilized to improve the on-going course if possible, future ones. Nevertheless, questions remained about the actual impact of the field training was? To be more precise: at the trainees' level: What has become of them after their training ? How do they utilize what they have learned? Does their performance improve as a result of the training ? Do they continue to use what they have learned from our courses some number of months or years afterward ? Do they feel the need of any post-training support? at the national organizations' level : What is their point of view as employers of former trainees and about their performance? What is the impact of our courses on their organization's activities? How could we better address their needs and concerns at the major training donor level (UNFPA}: How do the field offices perceive our program? How do they see its impact on their national projects or programs? How could we better address their national need? (excerpt)
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  22. 22
    168058

    Power in sexual relationships: an opening dialogue among reproductive health professionals.

    Population Council; United States. Agency for International Development [USAID]. Interagency Gender Working Group

    New York, New York, Population Council, 2001. vii, 56 p.

    This document summarizes the proceedings of a meeting held in March 2001 in Washington, District of Columbia. The meeting was co-sponsored by the Population Council and US Agency for International Development's Inter-agency Gender Working Group's Men and Reproductive Health Subcommittee. Gender-based power inequalities hinder communication between partners, limit the ability of individuals and couples to talk about or achieve desired child spacing and family size goals, limit effective use of reproductive health services, undercut men's and women's attainment of sexual health and pleasure, and increase substantially their vulnerability to HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted infections. The contents of this document include discussions on the evidence of power in sexual relationships; field-based efforts on service delivery, community, and socialization; and comments from the community of donors and implementing agencies.
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  23. 23
    093057

    Community-based distribution (CBD) of low cost family planning and maternal and child health services in rural Nigeria (expansion).

    Nigeria. Ministry of Health; Columbia University. Center for Population and Family Health [CPFH]

    In: Operations research family planning database project summaries, [compiled by] Population Council. New York, New York, Population Council, 1993 Mar. [2] p. (NGA-02)

    A community-based distribution (CBD) project has been in operation since 1980 in Oyo State, Nigeria. As a result of word-of-mouth communication among health professionals, television coverage of graduation ceremonies, and positive political feedback from the pilot area, the state government requested assistance in expanding the program. In collaboration with the State Health Council, the Pathfinder Fund, University College Hospital, and the Center for Population and Family Health of Columbia University, the program was expanded in 1982 at a cost of US $237,517. In each of the 4 health zones of the expansion area, a Primary Health Center (PHC) became the training and supervisory center. The expanded program was modified in light of experience in the pilot area. Monthly stipends to CBD workers were eliminated and, because of government policy, no fees were to be charged for services. (This policy was later reversed.) Also, a full-time CBD supervisor was assigned to each zone, rather than relying on individual maternity staff members for supervision. Each zone was limited to 100 CBD workers. Data collection included baseline and post-intervention knowledge, attitudes, and practice surveys and a village documentation survey to estimate the service population. The project also carried out in-depth CBD worker interviews, structured observations of training, mini-surveys, analyses of supervision records and service statistics, and a case study of the impact of the CBD program in which villagers were interviewed about the educational and clinical roles of the CBD workers. Although initial family planning (FP) acceptance was low, ever use of a modern method has increased from 2 to 25% in the pilot area. About half of the married women of reproductive ages in the project area are not sexually active at any one time because of postpartum abstinence. Most of the acceptance of modern contraceptives replaces use of traditional abstinence. Male promoters have proved to be an asset to male acceptance of FP services. Individual monetary incentives are not required to motivate CBD workers; however, once incentives are given, difficulties are created if they are stopped, as they were in the pilot area. The CBD approach has changed the concept of health care from that of providing services to clients who come to a fixed site to reaching out to provide services to all people living within a particular catchment area. The expanded project was subsequently extended into additional areas of Oyo State by the State Health Council. In addition, a conference to discuss the project, held in January 1985, was attended by health program managers and policymakers from all parts of Nigeria. The conference stimulated planning by State and Federal Ministries of Health to undertake CBD as a major strategy for primary health care in rural areas.
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  24. 24
    093131

    Monitoring AIBEF's service expansion through situation analysis.

    Association Ivoirienne pour le Bien-Etre Familial; Population Council

    In: Operations research family planning database project summaries, [compiled by] Population Council. New York, New York, Population Council, 1993 Mar. [2] p. (IVO-05)

    The number of family planning (FP) service delivery points (SDPs) in Cote d'Ivoire is increasing rapidly with the assistance of several USAID projects: SEATS for overall management assistance, INTRAH for clinical training, Johns Hopkins University/PCS for information, education, and communication (IEC), and the Africa operations research/technical assistance (OR/TA) project for the management information system (MIS). For example, during 1991, the Association Ivoirienne pour le Bien-Etre Familial (AIBEF) increased its SDPs from 3 to 19. By the end of 1992, 33 AIBEF-assisted public sector maternal and child health centers will become FP SDPs. This is the first step in a longterm program to increase the government's FP service delivery capacity and is a model for future activities. This study, which cost US $29,392, will monitor the management information system (MIS) to define its impact and role in the expansion. The MIS project will provide data on contraceptive use, reproductive intentions, and community flow but it will not describe several service delivery functions or information relative to the client, such as provider relations and IEC activities. The MIS data, therefore, must be complemented by data on 1) the quality of provider-client interactions, 2) the SDPs functional capacity for providing FP services (both physical and human resources), and 3) the user's experiences with FP services. This study will adapt a situational analysis methodology developed by The Population Council. Information will be collected from all operational SDPs (approximately 20). Of the 13 SDPs observed, 4 serviced 1200 to 1800 new and continuing users in 3 months. 3 other clinics serviced between 22 and 37. 24,221 clients accepted modern methods during that time, with 19% (mainly men) choosing condoms and 81% selecting prescription methods (85% oral contraceptives (OCs), 11% injectables, and 3% IUD). All clinics had a system for ordering contraceptives, yet all experienced stock-outs. Only 8% of clinics had an appropriate storage system. 55% of clinics held discussions about FP and reproductive health with service providers and clients. The study also revealed that 25% of all clients interviewed had had an abortion. In terms of personnel, there was a lack of FP educators disseminating IEC, and most clinics needed updated IEC materials. The record-keeping land logistics departments needed improvement as stock-outs were common. International management meetings and external supervisory visits were infrequent. For the most part, clients were satisfied with the FP services, although some mentioned a long wait and a lack of privacy. Numerous recommendations were made in order to provide FP services in clinics including: development of FP activities, improvement of quality of services, and development of counseling and interpersonal communication skills.
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  25. 25
    034623

    Adolescents: planning contraceptive and counselling services.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]. Central Council

    [Unpublished] 1985. 114 p.

    This document is a practical guide to help those Planned Parenthood Associations which want to establish contraception and counseling services for young people. It draws its examples from the considerable experience of selected European countries in what can be controversial and difficult areas. In the section devoted to adolescent sexuality and contraception, contributors cover culture and subculture, health and sexuality, sexual behavior and contraceptive services, the adolescent experience, the question of opposition to services for adolescents, and statistical indices. 1 section is devoted to examples of contraceptive counseling services for adolescents in Sweden, Italy, France, the UK, and Poland. Another section summarizes service provision examples. The 5th section presents methodology for the establishment of adolescents services and the final section discusses methodology testing of new projects. This report contends that the case for the rapid development of contraceptive/counseling services, tailored to the needs and desires of young people, is justified on moral as well as on sociological, psychological, and health grounds. It rejects totally the argument that any measure which could facilitate the sexual debut of the unmarried or legally dependent adolescent should be resisted. It does recognize public concern about family breakdown and the potential health risks of sexual activity but considers the examples given as measures designed to combat rather than ignore these. Taking into account sociological, psychological, and medical evidence, the contributors to this report challenge the following presumptions: sexual activity among the young is always and necessarily morally unacceptable and socially destructive; adolescents will resort to promiscuous sexual activity in the absence of legal deterrents such as refusal of access to contraceptive/counseling services; the potential health risks of sexual activity and use of contraceptives during adolescence provide sufficient justification for deterrent measures, including refusal of contraceptive/counseling services; and the scale of sexual ignorance and prevalence of unplanned pregnancy among adolescents can only be reduced by disincentives and deterrents to sexual activity itself. The case for the provision of contraceptive/counseling services rests on their potential to help adolescents to recognize and resist repressive forms of sexual activity, which are destructive of humanmanships. Evidence suggests that it is not difficult to attract a large cross-section of an adolescent public to use contraceptive/counseling services, where established.
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