Your search found 277 Results

  1. 1
    337630

    Family planning in Haiti: the achievements of 50 years.

    Ward VM; Santiso-Galvez R; Bertrand JT

    Chapel Hill, North Carolina, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Carolina Population Center, MEASURE Evaluation, 2015 Apr. [28] p. (SR-15-118H; USAID Cooperative Agreement No. AID-OAA-L-14-00004)

    This publication is one of eight case studies that were developed as part of a broader review entitled Family Planning in Latin America and the Caribbean: The Achievements of 50 Years. As its title implies, the larger review documents and analyzes the accomplishments in the entire region since the initiation of U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) funding in the early 1960s. The family planning movement in Haiti began in the 1960s, only a short time after family planning activities had been initiated in many other countries in the Latin American and Caribbean region. Initially, doctors and demographers worked together to encourage government policies around the issue and to begin private sector service provision programs in much the same way early family planning activities occurred elsewhere. Yet, in comparison with other countries within the region, Haiti’s progress on reproductive health has been slow.
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    337628

    Family planning in Colombia: the achievements of 50 years.

    Bertrand JT; Santiso-Galvez R; Ward VM

    Chapel Hill, North Carolina, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Carolina Population Center, MEASURE Evaluation, 2015 Apr. [26] p. (SR-15-118A; USAID Cooperative Agreement No. AID-OAA-L-14-00004)

    This publication is one of eight case studies that were developed as part of a broader review entitled Family Planning in Latin America and the Caribbean: The Achievements of 50 Years. As its title implies, the larger review documents and analyzes the accomplishments in the entire region since the initiation of U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) funding in the early 1960s. Family planning has become so deeply entrenched as a social norm in Colombia that it no longer constitutes the special area of interest that it did in the 1960s and 1970s. Nonetheless, challenges remain.
    Add to my documents.
  3. 3
    335173

    Expanding contraceptive choice in West Africa: Building the capacity of local nongovernmental organizations to program holistically.

    Jackson A

    New York, New York, EngenderHealth, RESPOND Project, 2013 Jun. [8] p. (Project Brief No. 15)

    This project brief looks at how nongovernmental organizations can expand access to contraception in West Africa and specifically looks at member associations of the International Planned Parenthood Federation in Benin, Burkina Faso and Togo.
    Add to my documents.
  4. 4
    333928

    A guide to family planning for health workers and their clients.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    [Geneva, Switzerland], WHO, 2010 Mar. [8] p.

    Adapted from the WHO's Decision-Making Tool for Family Planning Clients and Poviders, this flip-chart is a tool to use during family planning counseling or in group sessions with clients. It can: help your clients choose and use the method of family planning that suits them best; give you the information you need for high-quality and effective family planning counselling and care; help you know who may need referral.
    Add to my documents.
  5. 5
    328129

    [Family planning: a global handbook for providers. Evidence-based guidance developed through worldwide collaboration]

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Reproductive Health and Research; Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Center for Communication Programs. Information and Knowledge for Optimal Health [INFO]

    Baltimore, Maryland, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Center for Communication Programs, 2008. [489] p. (WHO Family Planning Cornerstone)

    This new handbook on family planning methods and related topics is the first of its kind. Through an organized, collaborative process, experts from around the world have come to consensus on practical guidance that reflects the best available scientific evidence. The World Health Organization (WHO) convened this process. Many major technical assistance and professional organizations have endorsed and adopted this guidance. This book serves as a quick-reference resource for all levels of health care workers. It is the successor to The Essentials of Contraceptive Technology, first published in 1997 by the Center for Communication Programs at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. In format and organization it resembles the earlier handbook. At the same time, all of the content of Essentials has been re-examined, new evidence has been gathered, guidance has been revised where needed, and gaps have been filled. This handbook reflects the family planning guidance developed by WHO. Also, this book expands on the coverage of Essentials: It addresses briefly other needs of clients that come up in the course of providing family planning. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  6. 6
    323078

    [Family planning: a global handbook for providers. Evidence-based guidance developed through worldwide collaboration] Planificacion familiar: un manual mundial para proveedores. Orientacion basada en la evidencia desarrollada gracias a la colaboracion mundial.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Reproductive Health and Research; Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Center for Communication Programs. Information and Knowledge for Optimal Health [INFO]

    Baltimore, Maryland, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Center for Communication Programs, 2007. [383] p. (WHO Family Planning Cornerstone)

    This new handbook on family planning methods and related topics is the first of its kind. Through an organized, collaborative process, experts from around the world have come to consensus on practical guidance that reflects the best available scientific evidence. The World Health Organization (WHO) convened this process. Many major technical assistance and professional organizations have endorsed and adopted this guidance. This book serves as a quick-reference resource for all levels of health care workers. It is the successor to The Essentials of Contraceptive Technology, first published in 1997 by the Center for Communication Programs at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. In format and organization it resembles the earlier handbook. At the same time, all of the content of Essentials has been re-examined, new evidence has been gathered, guidance has been revised where needed, and gaps have been filled. This handbook reflects the family planning guidance developed by WHO. Also, this book addresses briefly other needs of clients that come up in the course of providing family planning. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  7. 7
    315301

    Family planning: a global handbook for providers. Evidence-based guidance developed through worldwide collaboration.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Reproductive Health and Research; Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Center for Communication Programs. Information and Knowledge for Optimal Health [INFO]

    Baltimore, Maryland, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Center for Communication Programs, 2007. [383] p. (WHO Family Planning Cornerstone)

    This new handbook on family planning methods and related topics is the first of its kind. Through an organized, collaborative process, experts from around the world have come to consensus on practical guidance that reflects the best available scientific evidence. The World Health Organization (WHO) convened this process. Many major technical assistance and professional organizations have endorsed and adopted this guidance. This book serves as a quick-reference resource for all levels of health care workers. It is the successor to The Essentials of Contraceptive Technology, first published in 1997 by the Center for Communication Programs at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. In format and organization it resembles the earlier handbook. At the same time, all of the content of Essentials has been re-examined, new evidence has been gathered, guidance has been revised where needed, and gaps have been filled. This handbook reflects the family planning guidance developed by WHO. Also, this book expands on the coverage of Essentials: It addresses briefly other needs of clients that come up in the course of providing family planning. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  8. 8
    318091
    Peer Reviewed

    Evaluation of the World Health Organization's family planning decision-making tool: Improving health communication in Nicaragua.

    Kim YM; Davila C; Tellez C; Kols A

    Patient Education and Counseling. 2007 May; 66(2):235-242.

    The World Health Organization has led the development of a Decision-Making Tool for Family Planning Clients and Providers (DMT) to improve the quality of family planning counseling. This study investigates the DMT's impact on health communication in Nicaragua. Fifty nine service providers in Nicaragua were videotaped with 426 family planning clients 3 months before and 4 months after attending a training workshop on the DMT. The videotapes were coded for both provider and client communication. After the intervention providers increased their efforts to identify and respond to client needs, involve clients in the decision-making process, and screen for and educate new clients about the chosen method. While the DMT had a smaller impact on clients than providers, in general clients did become more forthcoming about their situation and their wishes. The DMT had a greater impact on sessions in which clients chose a new contraceptive method, as compared with visits by returning clients for a check-up or resupply. The DMT proved effective both as a job aid for providers and a decision-making aid for clients, regardless of the client's level of education. Job and decision-making aids have the potential to improve health communication, even or especially when clients have limited education and providers have limited training and supervision. (author's)
    Add to my documents.
  9. 9
    297473

    Viet Nam. RHIYA Viet Nam: innovative solutions for a nationwide youth-friendly service.

    Bormann SM

    Adolescence Education Newsletter. 2004 Jun; 7(1):18-19.

    The Adolescent Reproductive Health Toolkit will soon assist local service providers and health educators in putting up youth-friendly service centres in Viet Nam. This pioneering project hopes to cater to the 24 million Vietnamese youth facing serious problems on reproductive health and population education, but lack access to appropriate information and youth-friendly services. Since February 2004, RHIYA in Viet Nam has already implemented innovative initiatives such as street theatres and "condom cafés" to increase the effectiveness of behaviour change communication (BCC) among adolescents and youth. Now on its second phase, the newly established RHIYA Viet Nam is actively working on the completion of the ARH Toolkit, which will be a "how-to" guide for local institutions or organizations that want to establish youth-friendly service centres in the community. Specifically, the Toolkit will outline principles on how to establish, manage, market and monitor programmes that provide youth-friendly reproductive health information, education and counselling, and support clinical services for adolescents and youths in both urban and rural areas of Viet Nam. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  10. 10
    296569

    In Africa, hope and difficulties; training nurses in Angola and teaching young men responsible parenthood in Seychelles.

    UN Chronicle. 1987 Nov; 24(4):[3] p..

    Angola trained nurses to provide family planning services. Seychelles started a drive to educate young working people, particularly men, in responsible parenthood. Zimbabwe received a great quantity of contraceptives. All of this was accomplished in 1986 in sub-Saharan Africa with UNFPA help. Computer breakdowns slow work, but not all programmes worked equally well. Repeated computer breakdowns slowed down the Guinea census and the maternal and child health care project in Gabon was delayed by lack of equipment, staff and funds, according to UNFPA's latest annual report. Special projects for women in the region did not advance as rapidly as hoped. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  11. 11
    288784
    Peer Reviewed

    Keeping up with evidence. A new system for WHO's evidence-based family planning guidance.

    Mohllajee AP; Curtis KM; Flanagan RG; Rinehart W; Gaffield ML

    American Journal of Preventive Medicine. 2005; 28(5):483-490.

    The World Health Organization (WHO) is responsible for providing evidence-based family planning guidance for use worldwide. WHO currently has two such guidelines, Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use and Selected Practice Recommendations for Contraceptive Use, which are widely used globally and often incorporated into national family planning standards and guidelines. To ensure that these guidelines remain up-to-date, WHO, in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Information and Knowledge for Optimal Health (INFO) Project at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health’s Center for Communication Programs, has developed the Continuous Identification of Research Evidence (CIRE) system to identify, synthesize, and evaluate new scientific evidence as it becomes available. The CIRE system identifies new evidence that is relevant to current WHO family planning recommendations through ongoing review of the input to the POPulation information onLINE (POPLINE) database. Using the Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies in Epidemiology guidelines and standardized abstract forms, systematic reviews are conducted, peer-reviewed, and sent to WHO for further action. Since the system began in October 2002, 90 relevant new articles have been identified, leading to 43 systematic reviews, which were used during the 2003–2004 revisions of WHO’s family planning guidelines. The partnership developed to create and manage the CIRE system has pooled existing resources; scaled up the methodology for evaluating and synthesizing evidence, including a peer-review process; and provided WHO with finger-on-the-pulse capability to ensure that its family planning guidelines remain up-to-date and based on the best available evidence. (author's)
    Add to my documents.
  12. 12
    195906
    Peer Reviewed

    Are women and providers satisfied with antenatal care? Views on a standard and a simplified, evidence-based model of care in four developing countries.

    Langer A; Villar J; Romero M; Nigenda G; Piaggio G

    BMC Women's Health. 2002 Jul 19; 2(1):[10] p..

    This study assessed women and providers' satisfaction with a new evidence-based antenatal care (ANC) model within the WHO randomized trial conducted in four developing countries. The WHO study was a randomized controlled trial that compared a new ANC model with the standard type offered in each country. The new model of ANC emphasized actions known to be effective in improving maternal or neonatal health, excluded other interventions that have not proved to be beneficial, and improved the information component, especially alerting pregnant women to potential health problems and instructing them on appropriate responses. These activities were distributed within four antenatal care visits for women that did not need any further assessment. Satisfaction was measured through a standardized questionnaire administered to a random sample of 1,600 pregnant women and another to all antenatal care providers. Most women in both arms expressed satisfaction with ANC. More women in the intervention arm were satisfied with information on labor, delivery, family planning, pregnancy complications and emergency procedures. More providers in the experimental clinics were worried about visit spacing, but more satisfied with the time spent and information provided. Women and providers accepted the new ANC model generally. The safety of fewer visits for women without complications with longer spacing would have to be reinforced, if such a model is to be introduced into routine practice. (author's)
    Add to my documents.
  13. 13
    190013

    Adolescents data on reproductive health issues in the I.R. of Iran.

    Mosleh-uddin M; Nassiri N; Mir-Motahari M; Asghari

    [Unpublished] 2002. Presented at the 2002 International Union for the Scientific Study of Population [IUSSP] Conference on Southeast Asia's Population in a Changing Asian Context, Bangkok, Thailand, June 10-13, 2002. [23] p.

    The Islamic Republic of Iran is committed to improving the quality of life of its people one of the ways being through reducing the fertility that would lead to the improved health status and welfare of the people. UNFPA assistance complements the government’s plans and programmes to achieve these goals. During the Third UNFPA Country Programme.The activities are focused in the remote provinces of Sistan/Baluchistan, Bushehr, Kordestan, Golestan and Islamshahr located in South of Tehran. In order to assess the impact of UNFPA activities at the end of its Third Country Programme, a series of baseline surveys have been conducted by the Statistical Centre of Iran with collaboration of the UNFPA-Iran in the selected pilot areas. The paper presents the results of the baseline survey conducted to assess the knowledge and awareness about reproductive health matters among the students of the Junior and High Schools. This information will facilitate the monitoring and evaluation of the current programme of the Ministry of Education and help formulate the future plan of action. A random sample of schools was drawn from the list of 70 pilot schools. The targeted sample was 3,000 students and ultimately 2,951 students participated in the Survey. 1375 were boys and 1576 were girls, 440 were 8th Grade Junior high school students and 2511 were high school students from grades 9-11. The objective of the project is to impart information to the students on appropriate reproductive health matters in a culture friendly manner with sharper focus on adolescents growing up and puberty. The results of the survey reveal the need for reproductive health (RH) education in schools. The girls were more aware and informed about RH issues than the boys. These issues included even important topics like consequences of early marriage, the need for family planning prevention and treatment of HIV/AIDS. Within the sample as would be expected the students at the high school level had more knowledge on the subject of reproductive health than the students of the Junior high school level. There was generally a favorable attitude towards gender equity and equality. The project can be strengthened based on the Baseline Survey results which identify the critical areas where the level of knowledge is low. In order for the programme to succeed however training of teachers should be of high quality so that they are able to effectively discuss these sensitive topics in the classroom. (author's)
    Add to my documents.
  14. 14
    184558

    Fostering compliance with reproductive rights.

    Cook RJ

    In: An agenda for people: the UNFPA through three decades, edited by Nafis Sadik. New York, New York, New York University Press, 2002. 47-80.

    This chapter explains the various mechanisms for fostering compliance with different rights relating to reproductive and sexual health, and explores programming options for fostering such compliance. The chapter is not exhaustive, but exploratory; recognizing that much more discussion is needed to address this issue adequately. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  15. 15
    172637

    [IEC in MCH / FP programs] IEC dans les programmes de SMI / PF.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 1994. ix, 59 p. (Rapport d'Evaluation No. 7)

    This evaluation was made at the request of the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) with the goal of evaluating strategies of information, education and communication (IEC) in support of the Family Planning Program (FP) financed by this organization, in order to improve the planning and implementation of future strategies. This evaluation took into consideration a broad number of projects implemented in different countries and regions, and separated them into two categories. The first category includes projects regarding FP or an IEC component (integrated approach); the second category includes projects that refer exclusively to IEC (independent approach). Generally speaking, those projects contributed to raising the level of knowledge about the utilization of family planning methods. In every country we visited, we found a difference between the level of knowledge, which is relatively satisfactory, and the level of practice, which is weaker. The analysis of performances per type of configuration shows that the projects with an IEC integrated component reinforce the capacity of the services to accomplish their functions by giving them resources and necessary means, elaborating tools and methods of investigation, realization and evaluation. The knowledge and the use of FP services are amplified by the information, the sensitization and the education of the populations. The intersectorial and multi-disciplinary coordination of the participants involved in the performance and the IEC activities is even better because this coordination takes place in an environment that integrates MCH (Maternal and Child Health)/ FP/ IEC services. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  16. 16
    050131

    World Federation policy statement. IV. Incentives and disincentives relating to voluntary surgical contraception.

    World Federation of Health Agencies for the Advancement of Voluntary Surgical Contraception

    [Unpublished] 1981 Nov. 3 p.

    The recommendations of the 1974 Symposium on Law and Population are endorsed including taking into account the value system and customs of a society to counteract family planning (FP), obstacles and urging that government-sponsored FP programs be considered basic human rights. The incentives and disincentives of the International Conference on Family Planning held in Jakarta in 1981 are also approved. These relate to ethical, social, and political issues and the availability of FP information, education, and services; evaluation of the effectiveness of incentives to enhance community improvement, peer recognition, and social rewards; and the minimalization of cash incentives because of the potential for abuse. The balancing of individual rights to collective rights is also accepted as declared by the 1977 Expert Group Meeting of the Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific. In addition, the World Federation advocates principles on contraception of Health Agencies for the Advancement of Voluntary Surgical incentives and disincentives in voluntary surgical contraception to limit family size; psychological and social incentives; fees for service; discouragement of immediate financial incentives for acceptors; and continuous institutional monitoring and education of these guidelines. Assistance of member countries of the World Federation is a primary objective in this effort.
    Add to my documents.
  17. 17
    051895

    Lesotho Planned Parenthood Association. 1987 annual report.

    Lesotho Planned Parenthood Association

    Maseru, Lesotho, Lesotho Planned Parenthood Association, [1988]. [3], 107 p.

    The Lesotho Planned Parenthood Association is a private voluntary organization whose objectives are to assist government and other agencies in motivating and educating the public to understand and accept family planning and to provide family planning services to potential acceptors. It has the full support of the government of Lesotho, including the King, Moshoeshoe II. The Association also receives financial support from the International Planned Parenthood Federation. Projects were implemented during 1987 under all of the 4 major strategies of the Association: to rationalize and upgrade the Association's management capacity; to promote wider family planning awareness, acceptance, and practice; to reach specific groups with family life education; and to develop resources toward financial self-reliance. 4 management development seminars and several management workshops were organized and held. Family planning services continued to be offered in 7 government hospitals and 2 rented facilities, and community-based distribution of contraceptives continued. Family planning program awareness efforts were intensified through house and office visits, maternal-child health/family planning clinics, and other methods; and seminars were held for chiefs and church leaders. Efforts were made to recruit additional volunteers through various social functions. Field workers gave educational lectures at several industrial and business locations to try to motivate more men to participate in family planning, and a workshop was held for training teachers in family life education. Fund raising activities were only partially successful, since only 2/3 of the target sum was reached. 2 major events of 1987 were the finalization of the Personnel Management Policy Manual and the procurement of a loan for the building project from the Lesotho Building Finance Corporation. Overall, 1987 was not a successful year for program implementation, due partly to poor budgeting and management problems and a high rate of staff turnover within the Association and partly to external factors, including the severity of the winter and the return of the striking miners from South Africa, which caused widespread unemployment in Lesotho.
    Add to my documents.
  18. 18
    051763

    CFPA 1987 annual report.

    Caribbean Family Planning Affiliation [CFPA]

    St. John's, Antigua, CFPA, 1987. 39 p.

    In the 1920s 1/3 of the children in the Caribbean area died before age 5, and life expectancy was 35 years; today life expectancy is 70 years. In the early 1960s only 50,000 women used birth control; in the mid-1980s 500,000 do, but this is still only 1/2 of all reproductive age women. During 1987 the governments of St. Lucia, Dominica and Grenada adopted formal population policies; and the Caribbean Family Planning Affiliation (CFPA) called for the introduction of sex education in all Caribbean schools for the specific purpose of reducing the high teenage pregnancy rate of 120/1000. CFPA received funds from the US Agency for International Development and the United Nations Fund for Population Activities to assist in its annual multimedia IEC campaigns directed particularly at teenagers and young adults. CFPA worked with other nongovernmental organizations to conduct seminars on population and development and family life education in schools. In 1986-87 CFPA held a short story contest to heighten teenage awareness of family planning. The CFPA and its member countries observed the 3rd Annual Family Planning Day on November 21, 1987; and Stichting Lobi, the Family Planning Association of Suriname celebrated its 20th anniversary on February 29, 1988. CFPA affiliate countries made strides in 1987 in areas of sex education, including AIDS education, teenage pregnancy prevention, and outreach programs. The CFPA Annual Report concludes with financial statements, a list of member associations, and the names of CFPA officers.
    Add to my documents.
  19. 19
    041021

    Report on Asia-Pacific Workshop on Scouting and Family Life Education, Bangkok, Thailand, 21-27 June 1985.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]; World Scout Bureau. Asia-Pacific Region

    [Unpublished] 1985. 10, [27] p.

    This workshop, held in Thailand in 1985, was attended by 22 key trainers from 10 national scout organizations in the member countries of the Asia-Pacific region. The objectives of the conference were to enable participants to identify the problems and needs of young people in their respective countries, learn the value of family life education in relation to scouting, provide creative and effective activities for Scouts in family life education, design a plan for the promotion of family life education in the home and the community, and implement a scheme of close collaboration with family planning associations as well as other relevant governmental and nongovernmental agencies. A thorough exchange of ideas and experiences was fostered through carefully planned plenary sessions, group discussions, and individual exercises. All presentations stressed the similarity of the aims and objectives of family life education and scouting. A proficiency badge on family life education ("Happy Home Badge") was suggested as a means of introducing such education into scouting programs. The involvement of parents in Scout activities relating to family life was also encouraged. An effective way of generating and sustaining public interest and support for family life education in the Scout movement would be to implement activities that coincide with holidays such as Mother's Day and International Youth Year. There will be continuous monitoring of follow-up activities to the workshop by the 2 co-sponsoring organizations, International Planned Parenthood Foundation and World Scout Bureau, Asia-Pacific Region.
    Add to my documents.
  20. 20
    033424

    IPPF-WCOTP Joint Follow-up Mission to the 1976 Bolgatanga seminar on teachers and family life education, 2th - 28th October 1978.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]; World Confederation of Organizations of the Teaching Profession [WCOTP]

    [Unpublished] 1978. 57, 15 p.

    This document presents the results of a mission undertaken in 1978 by the World Confederation of Organizations of the Teaching Profession (WCOTP) and the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) to follow up on a seminar held in Bolgatanga, Ghana, in 1976 on the theme of Teachers and Family Life Education. The follow-up team spent 1 week in each of the following 4 countries: Gambia, Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Ghana. Among the aims of the mission were to evaluate the value of the Bolgatanga seminar in stimulating the development of family life education in participating countries; to assess how far national plans formulated at the 1976 seminar have been implemented; and to examine the level and nature of cooperation between teachers' unions, family planning associations, and other institutions and government departments. The 4 African countries were found to be at different levels of awareness and program development in the area of family life education. At this point, Ghana serves as a valuable model for other countries interested in developing family life education programs. There is wide awareness in Ghana of the need to provide education to young people that will reduce the incidence of problems related to sex. The 3 major findings that emerged from the 1978 mission relate more to the Gambia, Sierra Leone, and Liberia. Although there exists in these countries a general awareness of the need for some kind of organized family life education, the concept is not clearly understood and often confused with sex education and family planning. Also noted was a lack of coordination and communication among the many government departments, voluntary organizations, and institutions involved in family life education. Outside of Ghana, the Bolgatanga seminar appears to have had little direct impact on the development of family life education. The slow progress of national groups in implementing action plans in large measure reflects the unmet need for training, funding, and resource materials.
    Add to my documents.
  21. 21
    273042

    Report on the Preparatory Technical Consultation for the Meeting of ASEAN Heads of Population Programmes held in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 22-24 November 1976.

    Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations [FAO]; Regional Organization for Inter-Governmental Cooperation and Coordination in Population and Family Planning in Southeast Asia [IGCC]

    [Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia], Regional Organization for Inter-Governmental Cooperation and Coordination in Population and Family Planning in Southeast Asia, 1976. 248 p.

    The Preparatory Technical Consultation for the Meeting of ASEAN Heads of Population Programs was held in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, from November 22-24, 1976. It was organized by the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the Regional Organization for Inter-Governmental Cooperation and Coordination in Population and Family Planning in Southeast Asia. Sponsorship was also received from the United Nations Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA). From Nov. 24-26 the Meeting of ASEAN Heads of Population Programs hosted by ASEAN, Malaysia, and the National Family Planning Board of Malaysia (NFPB) was held. They met to exchange views and to compare experiences regarding population problems and programs, particularly those related to rural and urban under-privileged sectors; to define common needs of ASEAN population programs, and to delineate the likely thrust of population policies in the Region for the coming 10 years. The proposals for action which came from the discussions of the Preparatory Technical Consultation covered policy, programs, strategies, research, training, information, education, and communication. Particular emphasis was given to activities extending beyond traditional family planning approaches.
    Add to my documents.
  22. 22
    009112

    School and out of school population and family life education. Project request for United Nations Fund for Population Activities.

    Yemen. People's Democratic Republic. Ministry of Education; General Union of Yemeni Women

    [Unpublished] 1979. 47 p. (UNFPA Project No PDY/78/P01)

    The Population and Family Life Education Project of the People's Democratic Republic of Yemen consists of 2 separate but interrelated programs: school population and family life education; and out-of-school population and family life education. This project is directed towards the establishment and strengthening of population and family life education in the school system as well as in out-of-school activities. The school project includes the following: curriculum development in unity and secondary schools; production of text books, reference books, and audiovisual teaching aids; and teacher training programs. The out-of-school project includes the following: the strengthening of the General Union of Yemeni Women training centers; integration of family life education in the lieracy and post-literacy courses and in vocation education; and preparation of a Handbook on Family Life Education and Home Economics. The total proposed budget for the UN Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA) for the school population and family life education project is U.S. $495,800 for the 1979-1982 period. The budget for the out-of-school population and family life education is around U.S. $200,000 for the same period. Information on the following is included in this project proposal: background and supporting information; justification for the project; institutional framework; future UNFPA assistance; project objectives; and work plan. Immediate objectives include the following: launching a comprehensive population and family life education program to help in spreading population awareness and understanding of the demographic situation in Yemen; introducing population education for students in classes 4 to 8 and to reinforce the already existing components in classes 1-3 of the unity school and to integrate population education into selected subject matters from grades 9 to 11; to train approximately 1000 unity school level teachers and 160 pioneer teachers and 40 audiovisual aid pioneers in 4 years; and to train approximately 1500 pre-service teachers and 600 in-service teachers at the Higher College of Education.
    Add to my documents.
  23. 23
    722561

    Education and training for family planning in health services.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Study Group on Education and Training for Family Planning in Health Services

    Geneva, World Health Organization, 1972. (WHO Technical Report Series No . 508) p. 5-28.

    The World Health Organization Study Group on Education and Training for Family Planning in Health Services met in Geneva from December 6 to 10, 1971, to deal with the problems of developing education and training programs on the health aspects of family planning. They made the following recommendations: 1) health and other personnel should share the responsibility of providing and promoting family planning; 2) educational theories and practices that have been tested and proved successful should be used in family planning education and training; 3) instruction on human reproduction, family planning, and population dynamics should be provided at all levels and stages of health personnel education and training; 4) appropriate training programs consistent with local requirements should be developed when new types of family planning personnel are needed; 5) the training program administrator should first be involved in the planning of both service and health manpower training needs; 6) personnel require training before preceding with the action program; 7) top priority should be given to the training of teachers at all levels for education in family planning and population dynamics; 8) universities should take a leadership role in the promotion of education and training programs; 9) staff development should be identified as an essential concomitant of institutional change; 10) field studies based on the results of periodic evaluation of the training program should be undertaken; 11) the need for attitudinal change should be recognized and emphasized; and 12) family literature and training materials should be made available to all those involved in family planning efforts. (AUTHOR'S MODIFIED)
    Add to my documents.
  24. 24
    272846

    Southeast Asia Ministerial Conference on Family Planning and Population, Juala Lumpur, Oct. 1970.

    Southeast Asia Ministerial Conference on Family Planning and Population

    (Proceedings of the Southeast Asia Ministerial Conference. Kuala Lumpur, National Family Planning Board, 1970) 104 p

    Hosted by the Government of Malaysia, this Conference assembled ministries from Malaysia, Indonesia, Laos, Nepal, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam and observers from Canada, Japan, U.S.A., Asian Development Bank, ECAFE, IPPF, OECD, Population Council, UNFPA, UNICEF and WHO to explore the possibilities of regional cooperation in family and population planning. This report summarizes the events of the conference and gives the text of statements by each participant delivered at the open session on the 1st day. The details of deliberations at the closed ministerial session and the 3 sessions for officials are not given. However, the report includes the text of the working papers prepared by the Conference Secretariat which served as the basis of discussion. The subjects of these working papers were the population problem in Southeast Asia, objectives of a regional program of cooperation in family and population planning, the activities to be undertaken and priority projects. A Working Committee was appointed by the officials. Its report served as the basis for the Joint Communique issued at the end of the Conference in which the Ministers announced their agreement to create an Inter-Governmental Coordinating Committee with the Government of Malaysia providing an interim Secretariat and to implement several intraregional projects of research, communication of information, exchange of personnel, sharing of members and Conference staff are appended.
    Add to my documents.
  25. 25
    712324

    Health education in health aspects of family planning.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Study Group on Health Education in Health Aspects of Family Planning

    Geneva, World Health Organization, 1971. (Technical Report Series No. 483). 47 p.

    A WHO Study Group on Health Education in Health Aspects of Family Planning met in Geneva from December 15-21, 1970. A report of the group is presented. It is asserted that family planning contributes materially to 1 of the main aims of health services, by helping to ensure that every child, wherever possible, lives and grows up in a family unit with love and security in healthy surroundings, receives adequate nourishment, health supervision, and efficient medical attention, and is taught the elements of healthy living. The Study Group gave primary consideration to an analysis of the educational components fundamental to achieving the objectives of family planning services within the context of health services: the programming process, implementation, evaluation, methodology, coordination, and needs for studies and research. The Group noted that in many countries the integration of family planning care into health services not only has important educational implications but also brings many administrative and technical advantages. The contents of the report include sections on 1) family planning and its dependence on many services, 2) dependence of family planning on people, 3) some important requirements and difficulties, 4) objectives of education in health aspects of family planning, 5) a systematic approach to education in the health aspects of family planning, 6) importance of an organized health education service, 7) coordination of effort, 8) studies and research, and 9) recommendations.
    Add to my documents.

Pages