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  1. 1
    200338

    The population census as source for family life cycle data.

    Herberger L

    In: Health and the family life cycle: selected studies on the interaction between mortality, the family and its life cycle. Wiesbaden, Federal Republic of Germany, Federal Institute for Population Research, 1982. 37-63.

    The population census is a unique opportunity to gather data about families and fertility. For studying the life cycle of the family not only statistics about the family structure are necessary but also about fertility. Family statistics relate to the socio-biological institution of the family. Fertility statistics are calculated on the basis of a question asked to all women about the number of children born to them. The typology of families gives a 1st indication as to the process of family formation or dissolution in relation to marital status. The life cycle of the family usually starts with marriage and ends with the death of the surviving spouse. A review of the UN recommendations for the 1980 round of censuses show that data for the basic model can be derived from census data, if the information about the children born alive is collected. The UN Recommendations for the 1980 population censuses contain topics for which data should be collected and recommendations for the respective tabulations. Besides sex and age, the recommended topics for studying the family life cycle are: 1) marital status, 2) age at marriage, 3) duration of marriage, 4) children born alive (fertility data), 5) children living, 6) relationship to head of family, and 7) family composition. Information on marital status should be collected at least for persons aged 15 and over. The census report should explain clearly the definitions of each tabulated marital status category.
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  2. 2
    200345

    Operationalizing the family life-cycle concept within the context of United Nations recommendations for the 1980 censuses.

    Priest GE

    In: Health and the family life cycle: selected studies on the interaction between mortality, the family and its life cycle. Wiesbaden, Federal Republic of Germany, Federal Institute for Population Research, 1982. 65-88.

    This paper examines current models of the family life-cycle concept, reveals the results of experimentation with operationalizing the concept of an existing data base and comments on the potential of the concept for the 1980 Canadian Censuses. Roy Rodgers identifies 3 periods in the development of the family life cycle as pre-1948, 1948-1964, and post-1964. There are many factors affecting the entry and exit of families to and from the various stages of the life cycle, some of which are merely reflected in a progression through the normative model, but some of which would force the family into a deviant pattern. Operationalizing either the existing models, or models expanded to incorporate deviant life cycles is extremely difficult. The practice of doubling-up families is related to life-cycle differences, as are demands for different types of accommodation and shifts in tenure from owned to rented or vice versa. As there are cross-cultural or cross-ethnic differences in life-cycle patterns, so are there regional and urban-rural differences within Canada with indications that substantive differences in both the normative life cycle as well as deviant patterns are related to urban size groups, rural farms, and rural non-farm configurations. A new typology for 1981 Census publications, in many cases in cross-classifications showing socioeconomic characteristics of the families as well as characteristics of their accommodation, is proposed. 1 tabulation will show families by life cycle stage, by number of children and characteristics such as source and average income, percentage of income spent on shelter, availability of central heating, and size of dwelling.
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