Important: The POPLINE website will retire on September 1, 2019. Click here to read about the transition.

Your search found 6 Results

  1. 1
    392803
    Peer Reviewed

    Application opportunities of geographic information systems analysis to support achievement of the UNAIDS 90-90-90 targets in South Africa.

    Lilian RR; Grobbelaar CJ; Hurter T; McIntyre JA; Struthers HE; Peters RPH

    South African Medical Journal. 2017 Nov 27; 107(12):1065-1071.

    In an effort to achieve control of the HIV epidemic, 90-90-90 targets have been proposed whereby 90% of the HIV-infected population should know their status, 90% of those diagnosed should be receiving antiretroviral therapy, and 90% of those on treatment should be virologically suppressed. In this article we present approaches for using relatively simple geographic information systems (GIS) analyses of routinely available data to support HIV programme management towards achieving the 90-90-90 targets, with a focus on South Africa (SA) and other high-prevalence settings in low- and middle-income countries. We present programme-level GIS applications to map aggregated health data and individual-level applications to track distinct patients. We illustrate these applications using data from City of Johannesburg Region D, demonstrating that GIS has great potential to guide HIV programme operations and assist in achieving the 90-90-90 targets in SA.
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    375796

    World malaria report 2017.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2017. 196 p.

    The World malaria report, published annually, provides a comprehensive update on global and regional malaria data and trends. The latest report, released on 29 November 2017, tracks investments in malaria programmes and research as well as progress across all intervention areas: prevention, diagnosis, treatment and surveillance. It also includes dedicated chapters on malaria elimination and on key threats in the fight against malaria. The report is based on information received from national malaria control programmes and other partners in endemic countries; most of the data presented is from 2016.
    Add to my documents.
  3. 3
    323652

    WHO information note on the use of dual HIV/Syphilis rapid diagnostic tests (RDT).

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Reproductive Health and Research

    Geneva Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2017. 8 p. (Information Note; WHO/RHR/17.01)

    This information note provides interim advice for countries using or planning to introduce dual HIV/syphilis rapid diagnostic test (RDT) in antenatal services and other testing sites pending forthcoming WHO programmatic guidance, including a WHO recommended testing strategy. This note also emphasizes the need to ensure the quality of HIV and syphilis testing using RDTs, as well as laboratory-based testing, to avoid false positive and false negative HIV and syphilis results
    Add to my documents.
  4. 4
    375712

    Statement on maternal sepsis.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Reproductive Health and Research; World Health Organization [WHO]. Human Reproduction Programme [HRP]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2017. 4 p. (WHO/RHR/17.02)

    Strategic approaches to reduce maternal mortality in the past 15 years have mainly focused on clinical interventions and health system strengthening. The greatest attention has been on postpartum haemorrhage and hypertensive disorders, the two leading direct causes of maternal mortality. Further reducing maternal deaths is a priority for achieving the Sustainable Development Goals, implementing the UN Global Strategy for Women’s, Children’s and Adolescents’ Health and critical for the Strategies toward Ending Preventable Maternal Mortality (EPMM). However, the third most common direct cause of maternal mortality, maternal sepsis, received less attention, research and programming. Undetected or poorly managed maternal infections can lead to sepsis, death or disability for the mother and increased likelihood of early neonatal infection and other adverse outcomes. Recognizing the need to foster new thinking and to catalyse greater action to address this important cause of maternal and newborn mortality and morbidity, the World Health Organization (WHO) and Jhpiego have launched the Global Maternal and Neonatal Sepsis Initiative, dedicated to focusing additional effort, energizing stakeholders and accelerating progress in the area of maternal and neonatal infection and sepsis. This statement defines maternal sepsis and operationalizes the definition.
    Add to my documents.
  5. 5
    375642

    Managing complications in pregnancy and childbirth: a guide for midwives and doctors. Second edition.

    World Health Organization [WHO]; United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]; UNICEF

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2017. 492 p. (Integrated Management Of Pregnancy And Childbirth)

    Since the first edition was published in 2000, the Managing Complications in Pregnancy and Childbirth (MCPC) manual has been used widely around the world to guide the care of women and newborns who have complications during pregnancy, childbirth and the immediate postnatal period. The MCPC manual targets midwives and doctors working in district-level hospitals. Selected chapters from the first edition of the MCPC were revised in 2016 based on new World Health Organization recommendations, resulting in this second edition.
    Add to my documents.
  6. 6
    379137
    Peer Reviewed

    Uptake and performance of prevention of mother-to-child transmission and early infant diagnosis in pregnant HIV infected women and their exposed infants at seven health centres in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    Girma M; Wendaferash R; Shibru H; Berhane Y; Hoelscheer M

    Tropical Medicine and International Health. 2017 Jun; 22(6):765-775.

    Objective To assess the uptake of WHO-recommended PMTCT procedures in Ethiopia's health services. Methods Prospective observational study of HIV-positive pregnant mothers and their newborns attending PMTCT services at seven health centers in Addis Ababa. Women were recruited during antenatal care and followed-up with their newborns at delivery, day 6 and week 6 postpartum. Retention to PMCTC procedures, self-reported ART adherence, and HIV infant outcome were assessed. Turnaround times of HIV early infant diagnosis (EID) procedures were extracted from health registers. Results Of 494 women enrolled 4.9% did not complete PMTCT procedures due to active denial or loss to follow-up. HIV was first diagnosed in 223 (45.1%) and ART initiated in 321 (65.0%) women during pregnancy. ART was initiated in a median of 1.3 weeks (IQR 0-4.3) after HIV diagnosis. Poor self-reported treatment adherence was higher post-partum than during pregnancy (12.5% versus 7.0%, p=0.002), and significantly associated with divorced/separated marital status (RR 2.2, 95% CI 1.3-3.8), low family income (RR 2.1, 95% CI 1.1-4.1), low CD4-count (RR 1.7, 95% CI 1.0-3.0), and ART initiation during delivery (RR 2.5, 95% CI 1.1-5.6). Of 435 infants born alive 98.6% received nevirapine prophylaxis. The mother-to-child HIV transmission rate was 0.7% after a median of 6.7 weeks (IQR 6.4-10.4), but EID results were received for only 46.6% within 3 months of birth. Conclusion High retention in PMTCT services, triple maternal ART and high infant nevirapine prophylaxis coverage were associated with low mother-to-child HIV transmission. Declining post-partum ART adherence and challenges of EID linkage require attention.
    Add to my documents.