Important: The POPLINE website will retire on September 1, 2019. Click here to read about the transition.

Your search found 28 Results

  1. 1
    373335

    [The results of implementation of the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development Loan Project "Prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of tuberculosis and AIDS", a "tuberculosis" component]

    Tuberkulez I Bolezni Legkikh. 2010; (3):10-7.

    Due to the implementation of the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD) loan project "Prevention, diagnosis, treatment of tuberculosis and AIDS", a "Tuberculosis" component that is an addition to the national tuberculosis control program in 15 subjects of the Russian Federation, followed up by the Central Research Institute of Tuberculosis, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, the 2005-2008 measures stipulated by the Project have caused substantial changes in the organization of tuberculosis control: implementation of Orders Nos. 109, 50, and 690 and supervision of their implementation; modernization of the laboratories of the general medical network and antituberbulosis service (404 kits have been delivered for clinical diagnostic laboratories and 12 for bacteriological laboratories, including BACTEC 960 that has been provided in 6 areas); 91 training seminars have been held at the federal and regional levels; 1492 medical workers have been trained in the detection, diagnosis, and treatment of patients with tuberculosis; 8 manuals and guidelines have been prepared and sent to all areas. In the period 2005-2008, the tuberculosis morbidity and mortality rates in the followed-up areas reduced by 1.2 and 18.6%, respectively. The analysis of patient cohorts in 2007 and 2005 revealed that the therapeutic efficiency evaluated from sputum smear microscopy increased by 16.3%; there were reductions in the proportion of patients having ineffective chemotherapy (from 16.1 to 11.1%), patients who died from tuberculosis (from 11.6 to 9.9%), and those who interrupted therapy ahead of time (from 11.8 to 7.8%). Implementation of the IBR project has contributed to the improvement of the national strategy and the enhancement of the efficiency of tuberculosis control.
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    351595
    Peer Reviewed

    [Clinical, epidemiological and microbiological characteristics of a cohort of pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Cali, Colombia] Caracteristicas clinicas, epidemiologicas y microbiologicas de una cohorte de pacientes con tuberculosis pulmonar en Cali, Colombia.

    Rojas CM; Villegas SL; Pineros HM; Chamorro EM; Duran CE; Hernandez EL; Pacheco R; Ferro BE

    Biomedica. 2010 Oct-Dec; 30(4):482-91.

    INTRODUCTION: The World Health Organization recommended strategy for global tuberculosis control is a short-course, clinically administered treatment, This approach has approximately 70% coverage in Colombia. OBJECTIVE: The clinical, epidemiological and microbiological characteristics along with drug therapy outcomes were described in newly diagnosed, pulmonary tuberculosis patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was a descriptive study, conducted as part of a multicenter clinical trial of tuberculosis treatment. A cohort of 106 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis were recruited from several public health facilities in Cali between April 2005 and June 2006. Sputum smear microscopy, culture, drug susceptibility tests to first-line anti-tuberculosis drugs, chest X- ray and HIV-ELISA were performed. Clinical and epidemiological information was collected for each participant. Treatment was administered by the local tuberculosis health facility. Food and transportation incentives were provided during a 30 month follow-up period. RESULTS: The majority of patients were young males with a diagnostic delay longer than 9 weeks and a high sputum smear grade (2+ or 3+). The initial drug resistance was 7.5% for single drug treatment and 1.9% for multidrug treatments. The incidence of adverse events associated with treatment was 8.5%. HIV co-infection was present in 5.7% of the cases. Eighty-six percent of the patients completed the treatment and were considered cured. The radiographic presentation varied within a broad range and differed from the classic progression to cavity formation. CONCLUSION: Delay in tuberculosis diagnosis was identified as a risk factor for treatment compliance failure. The study population had similar baseline epidemiologic characteristics to those described in other cohort studies.
    Add to my documents.
  3. 3
    339305

    Engaging informal providers in TB control: what is the potential in the implementation of the WHO stop TB strategy? a discussion paper.

    Kaboru B; Uplekar M; Lonnroth K

    World Health and Population. 2011; 12(4):5-13.

    The World Health Organization (WHO) Stop TB Strategy calls for involvement of all healthcare providers in tuberculosis (TB) control. There is evidence that many people with TB seek care from informal providers before or after diagnosis, but very little has been done to engage these informal providers. Their involvement is often discussed with regard to DOTS (directly observed treatment - short course), rather than to the implementation of the comprehensive Stop TB Strategy. This paper discusses the potential contribution of informal providers to all components of the WHO Stop TB Strategy, including DOTS, programmatic management of multi-drug-resistant TB (MDR-TB), TB/HIV collaborative activities, health systems strengthening, engaging people with TB and their communities, and enabling research. The conclusion is that with increased stewardship by the national TB program (NTP), informal providers might contribute to implementation of the Stop TB Strategy. NTPs need practical guidelines to set up and scale up initiatives, including tools to assess the implications of these initiatives on complex dimensions like health systems strengthening.
    Add to my documents.
  4. 4
    342347
    Peer Reviewed

    Validation of 2006 WHO prediction scores for true HIV infection in children less than 18 months with a positive serological HIV test.

    Peltier CA; Omes C; Ndimubanzi PC; Ndayisaba GF; Stulac S; Arendt V; Courteille O; Muganga N; Kayumba K; Van den Ende J

    PloS One. 2009; 4(4):e5312.

    INTRODUCTION: All infants born to HIV-positive mothers have maternal HIV antibodies, sometimes persistent for 18 months. When Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) is not available, August 2006 World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations suggest that clinical criteria may be used for starting antiretroviral treatment (ART) in HIV seropositive children <18 months. Predictors are at least two out of sepsis, severe pneumonia and thrush, or any stage 4 defining clinical finding according to the WHO staging system. METHODS AND RESULTS: From January 2005 to October 2006, we conducted a prospective study on 236 hospitalized children <18 months old with a positive HIV serological test at the national reference hospital in Kigali. The following data were collected: PCR, clinical signs and CD4 cell count. Current proposed clinical criteria were present in 148 of 236 children (62.7%) and in 95 of 124 infected children, resulting in 76.6% sensitivity and 52.7% specificity. For 87 children (59.0%), clinical diagnosis was made based on severe unexplained malnutrition (stage 4 clinical WHO classification), of whom only 44 (50.5%) were PCR positive. Low CD4 count had a sensitivity of 55.6% and a specificity of 78.5%. CONCLUSION: As PCR is not yet widely available, clinical diagnosis is often necessary, but these criteria have poor specificity and therefore have limited use for HIV diagnosis. Unexplained malnutrition is not clearly enough defined in WHO recommendations. Extra pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), almost impossible to prove in young children, may often be the cause of malnutrition, especially in HIV-affected families more often exposed to TB. Food supplementation and TB treatment should be initiated before starting ART in children who are staged based only on severe malnutrition.
    Add to my documents.
  5. 5
    322017

    Antiretroviral therapy for HIV infection in infants and children: towards universal access. Recommendations for a public health approach.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of HIV / AIDS

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2007. [147] p.

    These stand-alone treatment guidelines serve as a framework for selecting the most potent and feasible first-line and second-line ARV regimens as components of expanded national responses for the care of HIV-infected infants and children. Recommendations are provided on: diagnosing HIV infection in infants and children; when to start ART, including situations where severe HIV disease in children less than 18 months of age has been presumptively diagnosed; clinical and laboratory monitoring of ART; substitution of ARVs for toxicities. The guidelines consider ART in different situations, e.g. where infants and children are coinfected with HIV and TB or have been exposed to ARVs either for the prevention of MTCT (PMTCT) or because of breastfeeding from an HIV-infected mother on ART. They address the importance of nutrition in the HIV-infected child and of severe malnutrition in relation to the provision of ART. Adherence to therapy and viral resistance to ARVs are both discussed with reference to infants and children. A section on ART in adolescents briefly outlines key issues related to treatment in this age group. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  6. 6
    318283

    A research agenda for childhood tuberculosis. Improving the management of childhood tuberculosis within national tuberculosis programmes: research priorities based on a literature review.

    Donald P; Maher D; Qazi S

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2007. [123] p. (WHO/HTM/TB/2007.381; WHO/FCH/CAH/07.02)

    Childhood TB is a neglected aspect of the TB epidemic, despite constituting 20% or more of the TB case-load in many countries with high TB incidence. This "orphan disease" exists in the shadow of adult TB and is a significant child health problem, but is neglected because it is usually smear-negative and is thus considered to make a relatively minor contribution to the spread of TB. In order to redress this neglect and integrate childhood TB into the mainstream of TB control activities, research priorities are identified that will assist in improving the prevention and management of childhood TB as a part of national TB programmes (NTPs). The proposed research agenda seeks to better define childhood TB, to optimize the treatment of childhood TB and to identify the best management practices by which childhood TB can be accurately documented and recorded, and efficiently managed within NTPs. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  7. 7
    316237
    Peer Reviewed

    Planning to improve global health: the next decade of tuberculosis control.

    Maher D; Dye C; Floyd K; Pantoja A; Lonnroth K

    Bulletin of the World Health Organization. 2007 May; 85(5):325-420.

    The Global Plan to Stop TB 2006-2015 is a road map for policy-makers and managers of national programmes. It sets out the key actions needed to achieve the targets of the Millennium Development Goals relating to tuberculosis (TB): to halve the prevalence and deaths by 2015 relative to 1990 levels and to save 14 million lives. Developed by a broad coalition of partners, the plan presents a model approach combining interventions that can feasibly be supplied on the ground. The main areas of activity set out in the plan are: scaling up interventions to control tuberculosis; promoting the research and development of improved diagnostics, drugs and vaccines; and engaging in related activities for advocacy, communications and social mobilization. Scenarios for the planning process were developed; these looked at issues both globally and in seven epidemiological regions. The scenarios made ambitious but realistic assumptions about the pace of scale-up and implementation coverage of the activities. A mathematical model was used to estimate the impact of scaling up current interventions based on data from studies of tuberculosis biology and from experience with tuberculosis control in diverse settings. The estimated costs of the activities set out in the Global Plan were based on implementing interventions and researching and developing drugs, diagnostics and vaccines; these costs were US$ 56 billion over 10 years. When translated into cost per disability adjusted life year averted, these costs compare favourably with those of other public health interventions. This approach to planning for global tuberculosis control is a valuable example of developing plans to improve global health that has relevance for other health issues. (author's)
    Add to my documents.
  8. 8
    312718

    The Stop TB Partnership in South Africa: a review.

    Barr D; Padarath A; Salt L

    Durban, South Africa, Health Systems Trust, 2004. 61 p.

    This case study presents an overview of the Stop TB Partnership operating in the South African context. It offers an analysis of the activities and impact of the Partnership in South Africa. Its overarching objective is to collect a set of baseline data on the functioning and operational aspects of the Partnership and to assess whether such initiatives contribute to the development of equitable health services in the public health sector. Tuberculosis is a priority disease in South Africa: the cure rate for new patients of 64% is still way below the World Health Organization (WHO) target of 85%. In some provinces, the cure rate is as low as 40%. The estimated incidence of TB per 100 000 population is 526, and an estimated 60% of adults with TB are also HIV positive. South Africa is ranked third in the WHO AFRO region by the number of TB cases, and ninth globally. Funded by WEMOS, this review is part of a multi-country study. It aims to augment the existing body of knowledge on Global Public Private Initiatives in Health (GPPIs) and to generate a body of country-based evidence relating to the effect of GPPIs on health policies and health systems. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  9. 9
    312290

    Guidance for national tuberculosis programmes on the management of tuberculosis in children.

    Bjune G; Cotton M; El Sony A; Gie R; Graham S

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2006. [49] p. (WHO/HTM/ TB/2006.371; WHO/FCH/CAH/2006.7)

    This document complements existing national and international guidelines and standards for managing TB, many of which include guidance on children. It fills the gaps in the existing materials and provides current recommendations based on the best available evidence. National and regional TB control programmes may wish to revise and adapt this guidance according to local circumstances. This document reflects two important recent policy changes. Firstly, NTPs should record and report two age groups for children (0--4 years and 5--14 years) using the quarterly reporting form. Routine reporting of these two age groups has considerable benefits. Enumerating children with TB is a key step in bringing their management into the mainstream of the Stop TB Strategy as part of routine NTP activities. This age breakdown is crucial in ordering drugs (since child-friendly formulations are particularly important in children aged 0--4 years) and in monitoring of trends in these two distinct age groups (since children aged 0--4 years are the most vulnerable and infection at these early ages indicates recent transmission). In addition, routine NTP data collection will provide valuable and sustainable information on market needs concerning child-friendly formulations of anti-TB drugs. Secondly, the revised recommended dose of ethambutol is now 20 mg/kg (range 15--25 mg/kg) daily. Although ethambutol was previously often omitted from treatment regimens for children, due in part to concerns about toxicity (particularly optic neuritis), a literature review indicates that it is safe in children at this dose. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  10. 10
    307809

    Tuberculosis in children [editorial]

    Mehnaz A

    Journal of the Pakistan Medical Association. 2006 Sep; 56(9):390-391.

    Tuberculosis, one of the oldest and deadliest infectious diseases had a dramatic comeback in the last quarter of the century. WHO declared Tuberculosis (TB) as a global emergency in 1993. Though no nation was immune from the disease, the main brunt of the disease was found in the developing countries. The escalating incidence of tuberculosis in Pakistan is due to persistence of poor socio-political conditions, inadequate health care infrastructure, undernutrition, overcrowded living conditions, influx of refugees, rising incidence of HIV/AIDS, and a general apathy towards health and related problems. Pakistan is identified as sixth among the 22 countries of the EMRO region with the highest burden of TB. In 2001, the Government of Pakistan declared Tuberculosis as a National Emergency. In 2002 the National Tuberculosis Control Programme (NTP) a project of Ministry of Health (MoH), Government of Pakistan, adopted and initiated the implementation of DOTS programme. The objective of the NTP was to provide 100 percent DOTS coverage by 2005, detecting 70% of all cases and successfully treating 85% of them by 2005 and reducing the prevalence and deaths due to tuberculosis by 50% by 2010. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  11. 11
    306526
    Peer Reviewed

    Nosocomial tuberculosis in India.

    Pai M; Kalantri S; Aggarwal AN; Menzies D; Blumberg HM

    Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2006 Sep; 12(9):1311-1318.

    Most high-income countries implement tuberculosis (TB) infection control programs to reduce the risk for nosocomial transmission. However, such control programs are not routinely implemented in India, the country that accounts for the largest number of TB cases in the world. Despite the high prevalence of TB in India and the expected high probability of nosocomial transmission, little is known about nosocomial and occupational TB there. The few available studies suggest that nosocomial TB may be a problem. We review the available data on this topic, describe factors that may facilitate nosocomial transmission in Indian healthcare settings, and consider the feasibility and applicability of various recommended infection control interventions in these settings. Finally, we outline the critical information needed to effectively address the problem of nosocomial transmission of TB in India. (author's)
    Add to my documents.
  12. 12
    301999

    Tuberculosis care and control [editorial]

    Hopewell PC; Migliori GB; Raviglione MC

    Bulletin of the World Health Organization. 2006 Jun; 84(6):428.

    Tuberculosis care, a clinical function consisting of diagnosis and treatment of persons with the disease, is the core of tuberculosis control, which is a public health function comprising preventive interventions, monitoring and surveillance, as well as incorporating diagnosis and treatment. Thus, for tuberculosis control to be successful in protecting the health of the public, tuberculosis care must be effective in preserving the health of individuals. There are three broad mechanisms through which tuberculosis care is delivered: public sector tuberculosis control programmes, private sector practitioners having formal links to public sector programmes (the public--private mix), and private providers having no connection with formal activities. In most countries, programmes in both the public sector and the public--private mix are guided by international and national recommendations based on the DOTS tuberculosis control strategy -- a systematic approach to diagnosis, standardized treatment regimens, regular review of outcomes, assessment of effectiveness and modification of approaches when problems are identified. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  13. 13
    298767
    Peer Reviewed

    The Global Plan to Stop TB: a unique opportunity to address poverty and the Millennium Development Goals.

    Squire SB; Obasi A; Nhlema-Simwaka B

    Lancet. 2006 Mar 18; 367(9514):955-957.

    The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) provide the guiding framework within which the Stop TB Partnership's Second Global Plan to Stop TB has been conceived, and poverty is rightly recognised as a key cross-cutting issue for tuberculosis control. This explicit pro-poor focus, although important in itself, will only make a difference to the individual lives of the poor if practical steps are taken to address the obstacles that these people face in accessing good tuberculosis services, and if programme implementation takes account of the distribution of poverty within target communities as a whole. That the Plan goes beyond the rhetoric and lays out the practical steps that tuberculosis programmes can take to address poverty is encouraging (panel). (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  14. 14
    298766
    Peer Reviewed

    WHO's new Stop TB Strategy.

    Raviglione MC; Uplekar MW

    Lancet. 2006 Mar 18; 367(9514):952-955.

    Government commitment, diagnosis through microscopy, standardised and supervised treatment, uninterrupted drug supply, and regular monitoring, which together constitute DOTS--the WHO recommended tuberculosis control strategy--are all essential for controlling tuberculosis. DOTS has helped make remarkable progress in global control of the disease over the past decade. The gain is evident: nearly 20 million patients have been cured of tuberculosis. However, global statistics suggest that DOTS alone is not sufficient to achieve the 2015 tuberculosis-related Millennium Development Goals (MDG) and the Stop TB Partnership targets. The need for a new strategy that builds on, and goes beyond, DOTS has also been recognised by the Second Ad-hoc Committee on the Global TB Epidemic and the 2005 World Health Assembly. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  15. 15
    298765
    Peer Reviewed

    Progress of DOTS in global tuberculosis control.

    Sharma SK; Liu JJ

    Lancet. 2006 Mar 18; 367(9514):951-952.

    In the early 1990s, the global public-health community woke up to the reality that despite the availability of effective diagnostic and therapeutic tools, tuberculosis was one of the world's leading killers. The strategy that was subsequently devised, DOTS, was based on decades-old principles and technologies, but was engendered by new energy and political will (panel); the aim, to achieve 70% case detection and 85% cure rate by 2005. Although these goals were not achieved on a global scale and implementation of the programme has been patchy and sporadic in places, overall its roll-out has been rapid and effective. That said, DOTS can only be the foundation for global tuberculosis control; to truly contain the disease, much more is needed in the control of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and the development of drugs, diagnostics, and vaccines. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  16. 16
    298760
    Peer Reviewed

    Progress towards improved tuberculosis diagnostics for developing countries.

    Perkins MD; Roscigno G; Zumla A

    Lancet. 2006 Mar 18; 367(9514):942-943.

    The lack of accurate, robust, and rapid diagnostics for tuberculosis impedes management of patients and disease control. For individual patients, the cost, complexity, and potential toxicity of 6 months of standard treatment demands certainty in diagnosis. For communities, the risk of transmission from undetected cases requires widespread access to diagnostic services and early detection. Unfortunately, diagnostic services in most places where tuberculosis is endemic fail both the individual and the community. Patients are often diagnosed after weeks to months of waiting, at substantial cost to themselves, and at huge cost to society. Many patients are never diagnosed, and contribute to the astonishing number of yearly deaths from tuberculosis worldwide. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  17. 17
    298508

    Tuberculosis in children: considerations for children from developing countries.

    Nelson LJ; Wells CD

    Seminars in Pediatric Infectious Diseases. 2004 Jul; 15(3):150-154.

    Although accurate data are scarce for children, tuberculosis (TB) represents one of the most common infectious causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. TB case rates have declined among children in the United States in the last decade, but they remain high among children from low-income countries and racial or ethnic minorities. Establishing the definitive diagnosis of TB in a child remains difficult and frequently relies on a constellation of history, clinical findings, and bacteriology. Recently, updated national and international treatment recommendations have been published. Contact investigation and treatment using directly observed therapy are important components of the optimal case detection and management of TB in children. (author's)
    Add to my documents.
  18. 18
    282830

    Tuberculosis and HIV: a framework to address TB / HIV co-infection in the Western Pacific Region.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Regional Office for the Western Pacific

    Manila, Philippines, WHO, Regional Office for the Western Pacific, 2004. 44 p.

    This framework, which draws on the Global strategic framework to reduce the burden of TB/HIV and on the Guidelines for phased implementation of collaborative TB and HIV activities, was developed based on the following two premises. First, the National TB Programme (NTP) needs to address the impact of HIV, i.e. higher caseload of TB and increasing drug-resistant TB, and to mobilize resources related to TB/HIV activities. Second, the National AIDS Programme (NAP) needs to prolong the life and reduce the suffering of PHA through better management of TB, and to mobilize resources for TB/HIV. The Regional framework is built on the strengths of the individual National TB and AIDS Programmes, and identifies areas in which both programmes complement each other in addressing TB/HIV. This approach is considered useful, not only for countries with a relatively high prevalence of HIV, such as Cambodia, but also for most of countries in the Region that are faced with a relatively low prevalence of HIV. The scope of the Regional framework comprises interventions against tuberculosis (intensified case- finding and cure and tuberculosis preventive treatment) and interventions against HIV (and therefore indirectly against tuberculosis), e.g. comprehensive prevention, care and support, including condoms, sexually transmitted infection (STI) treatment, safe injecting drug use (IDU) and antiretroviral (ARV) treatment. Key components of the Regional framework are: surveillance; diagnosis and referral, including voluntary counselling and testing (VCT) for HIV; interventions; and, areas of collaboration. The framework outlines the roles of the individual TB and HIV/AIDS programmes (i.e. “who does what”) and provides examples of how to operationalize the different components. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  19. 19
    273650
    Peer Reviewed

    New measurable indicator for tuberculosis case detection.

    Borgdorff MW

    Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2004 Sep; 10(9):1523-1528.

    The World Health Organization’s goal for tuberculosis (TB) control is to detect 70% of new, smear-positive TB cases and cure 85% of these cases. The case detection rate is the number of reported cases per 100,000 persons per year divided by the estimated incidence rate per 100,000 per year. TB incidence is uncertain and not measured but estimated; therefore, the case detection rate is uncertain. This article proposes a new indicator to assess case detection: the patient diagnostic rate. The patient diagnostic rate is the rate at which prevalent cases are detected by control programs and can be measured as the number of reported cases per 100,000 persons per year divided by the prevalence per 100,000. Prevalence can be measured directly through national prevalence surveys. Conducting prevalence surveys at 5- to 10-year intervals would allow countries with high rates of disease to determine their case detection performance by using the patient diagnostic rate and determine the effect of control measures. (author's)
    Add to my documents.
  20. 20
    193980

    Tuberculosis in Pakistan: are we losing the battle? [editorial]

    Khan JA; Malik A

    Journal of the Pakistan Medical Association. 2003 Aug; 53(8):[2] p..

    How many private practitioners (PPs) listening to usual complaints of 'fever, cough and weakness for over two weeks' consider a diagnosis of active tuberculosis? In Pakistan, where TB is endemic and has assumed large proportions, the diagnosis would be considered and correctly treated by only a small percentage of PPs. A study recently conducted by the authors in Karachi showed that only 66% PPs ordered sputum microscopy as the preferred method for diagnosing TB. Only 50% thought themselves as capable enough to treat patients with pulmonary TB. Only 21% doctors prescribed a correct regimen in accordance with NTP or WHO guidelines. In such circumstances, if the PPs are treating 80% of patients presenting to them with tuberculosis1, one can imagine how worse the situation can get. Despite the fact that World Health Organization (WHO), in its effort to control TB, declared it a global emergency in 1993, TB still continues to account for the largest burden of mortality by any infectious agent worldwide. It is the second leading cause of adult death in impoverished communities of Karachi. Globally, Pakistan ranks 8th in terms of estimated number of cases by WHO, with an incidence of 175/100,000 persons. Pakistan alone accounts for 44% of total TB burden in the Eastern Mediterranean Region of the WHO comprising 23 countries. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  21. 21
    140605
    Peer Reviewed

    Cost-effectiveness analysis of tuberculosis control policies in Ivanovo oblast, Russian Federation.

    Migliori GB; Khomenko AG; Punga VV; Ambrosetti M; Danilova I; Ribka LN; Grzemska M; Sawert H; Raviglione MC

    BULLETIN OF THE WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION. 1998; 76(5):475-83.

    In 1995, the Russian Federation reported more than 85,000 new tuberculosis (TB) cases, a 69% increase over the lowest ever incidence of 34 cases per 100,000 population in 1991. However, many of the federation's TB control programs are based upon expensive, yet underfunded, strategies which use long, individualized treatment regimens. The authors compared the cost-effectiveness of the new World Health Organization (WHO) strategy implemented in the Ivanovo Oblast of case-finding among symptomatic patients and shorter treatment regimens, with the old strategy of actively screening the asymptomatic population and longer regimens. The cost per case cured was calculated at different levels of cure rate (45-95%) using 3 scenarios to describe the WHO strategy and a fourth scenario to describe the old strategy. The cost per case cured at an 85% cure rate level ranged from US$1197 using the WHO strategy to US$6293 using the old strategy. The cost per case detected ranged from US$1581 using the WHO strategy to US$4000 using the old strategy. Significant savings can therefore be realized from shifting toward the new WHO strategy.
    Add to my documents.
  22. 22
    110848

    WHO criticised for "inflating" AIDS figures.

    Derbyshire SW

    AIDS ANALYSIS AFRICA. 1995 Dec; 5(6):4-5.

    The World Health Organization (WHO) has issued exaggerated projections about AIDS deaths that the press picked up to paint an apocalyptic future for Africa. Computer models used by WHO estimate that 2-3 million people in Africa are suffering or have died from AIDS since the early 1980s and another 10 million are carrying HIV. WHO surveys during 1987 indicated HIV seroprevalence rates from 5% to 30%. The Global Program on AIDS (GPA) utilized these data to predict 6.5 million new AIDS deaths annually by 1997, which would reduce population growth in urban areas by over 30%. This projection seems to be an exaggeration. The same 1987 figures were used to predict AIDS deaths for 1992. Using the highest seroprevalence rate of 30%, the WHO model predicted a high scenario of 6 million new AIDS deaths in 1992, when in fact the cumulative cases were only 331,376 in 1994. Even the low scenario of a 5% seroprevalence rate predicted 750,000 new AIDS cases for 1992, whereas the 1% rate suggested 500,000 new AIDS cases. Another projection made in 1994 estimated only 350,000 new AIDS cases for Africa in 1994. The discrepancies between projections and recorded figures are attributable to lack of statistical data and reliable reporting of mortality. National estimates are derived from censuses and surveys which are overextrapolated. Since 1985, AIDS has been defined in Africa on the basis of clinical observation (chronic diarrhea or prolonged fever and persistent cough or herpes) because of lack of HIV testing facilities. However, it is impossible to tell whether someone who develops malaria does so because of AIDS or because of normal impaired immunity. This definition has inflated the estimated AIDS figures. The danger of the AIDS epidemic is dwarfed by 3.5 million deaths from tuberculosis and 16.8 million deaths from malaria since the beginning of the AIDS epidemic. The frightening scenario looms that widespread, but curable, diseases are wrongly classified as AIDS-related complex, thereby foregoing appropriate treatment.
    Add to my documents.
  23. 23
    102070

    Tuberculosis control in seventeen developing countries.

    Shepperd JD

    [Unpublished] 1994 Sep. Presented at the 122nd Annual Meeting of the American Public Health Association [APHA], Washington, D.C., 1994. iii, 28 p.

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality from an infectious disease and is responsible for 3.9 million deaths/year. The incidence and severity of TB are exacerbated by the rapid spread of HIV infections. In 1993, a USAID task force presented a report on the TB situation in less developed countries and recommended agency actions (no policy decisions have been made). The World Health Organization (WHO) subsequently requested USAID assistance for a broad range proposal to tackle the problem of TB and implied that WHO had developed a cost effective TB strategy. USAID requested the country evaluations WHO referred to in its proposal, and this report is based on a review of those data. The country reports reviewed are from Burundi, Comoros, Ethiopia, Guinea, Rwanda, Somalia, Tanzania, Malawi, Mozambique, Afghanistan, China, India, the Philippines, Brazil, Cuba, Nicaragua, Algeria. A summary is presented for each country report (except Afghanistan), overall findings are discussed, and unmet needs are identified. In general, the reports summarized from a variety of authors indicate that TB can be controlled through an extraordinary devotion of resources. Only Cuba treats TB as a socioeconomic problem; most of the other reviewers were entirely concerned with the medical aspects of the complex multidrug therapy approach and almost ignored that fact that patient compliance averaged only 30% unless there was massive donor support. It is concluded that the following needs must be met to address TB: 1) political commitment to TB control must be strong; 2) the cost of TB to economic security must be established; 3) the public understanding of TB must be enhanced; 4) the serious barriers to treatment must be addressed; 5) the health care delivery systems in developing countries must be strengthened; and 6) the capacities to support TB control must be increased. It was recommended that existing projects could be supplemented by a program which would cost US $2-5 million/year in order to address some unmet needs in the technical areas of training, research, and advocacy in developing countries.
    Add to my documents.
  24. 24
    069078

    What use is a clinical case definition for AIDS in Africa?

    Gilks CF

    BMJ. British Medical Journal. 1991 Nov 9; 303(6811):1189-90.

    The article proposes that the clinical case definition for Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome in Africa is an unworkable concept, with the wrong definition, incorrect validation, improper use, and consequently is a poor surveillance tool. The definition was proposed by the World Health Organization in 1986 to satisfy the use in countries with limited diagnostic resources, and resources for serological testing. Critical review until now of this procedure was lacking. Currently serological testing is available and of high quality. It does not seem justifiable to continue using a provisional surveillance definition. Abandoning this classification procedure may also lead to the focus on problems other than opportunistic infections and AIDs. Clinical surveillance is important, but as well morbidity and mortality need monitoring. It is argued that the definition is an unworkable concept because patients with underlying immunosuppression disorders such as AIDs can not be easily distinguished from chronic disease patients; i.e., pulmonary tuberculosis, renal failure, uncontrolled diabetes, or diarrhea with weight loss. Clinical accuracy is insufficient. It is the wrong definition because pulmonary tuberculosis with a persistent cough cannot be distinguished for those HIV positive and those not. There is inconsistency in the WHO clinical definition and the Centers for Disease Control definitions of AIDs. The incidence of tuberculosis in countries with unmodified clinical case definitions may contribute to an inflated number of AIDs cases. The wrong standards were used to validate the WHO definition in evaluative studies. The reference sensitivity ranges indicate that the definition is insensitive to identifying seropositive patients. Also, the HIV status of patients does not equate with AIDs. Although designed for surveillance, the clinical case definition is used by doctors for individual patient management. Labeling a patient as having AIDs, when he is HIV negative, leads to negative consequences. Researchers compare African AIDs data with North American data with imprecise and noncomparable definitions. As a surveillance tool in countries with a fragmentary or without a vital registration system, it is an inaccurate tool. Alternatives to obtaining data about the spread and impact of HIV are cluster sampling, hospital surveillance of selected populations, anonymous testing of pregnant women or patients in sexually transmitted disease clinics. In Nairobi, a necropsy survey found that 16% had AIDs but 38% were HIV positive.
    Add to my documents.
  25. 25
    069077

    AIDS surveillance in Africa: a reappraisal of case definitions.

    De Cock KM; Selik RM; Soro B; Gayle H; Colebunders RL

    BMJ. British Medical Journal. 1991 Nov 9; 303(6811):1185-8.

    Surveillance of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) provides a measure of severe morbidity and mortality caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV); these cases represent severe symptomatic illness within the health care system. AIDs reporting in the US is considered complete with 70-90% of deaths related to HIV. In Africa, WHO estimates that 10% of AIDs cases are reported. This article suggests modifications in the WHO clinical definition of AIDs and discusses problems in the surveillance system. It is noted that clinical work required a simple staging system of HIV infection and disease, rather than epidemiological monitoring. The WHO definition requires 2 major symptoms with at least 1 minor sign in the absence of known causes of immunosuppression such as cancer or severe malnutrition or other recognized etiologies. The major signs are weight loss >10% of body weight, chronic diarrhea >1 month, and prolonged fever >1 month (intermittent or constant). Minor signs are persistent cough >1 month, generalized pruritic dermatitis, recurrent herpes zoster, oropharyngeal candidiasis, chronic progressive and disseminated herpes simplex infection, and generalized lymphadenopathy. The present of generalized Karposi's sarcoma or cryptococcal meningitis are sufficient alone for an AIDs diagnosis. Inadequacies of the WHO definition are its lack of sensitivity, moderate predictive value, and failure to include common symptoms of HIV infection. There is evidence of HIV associated disease not recognized as AIDs. The common symptoms of AIDs in Africa are profound weight loss, chronic diarrhea, and chronic fever (slim disease). The WHO definition was modified in 1987 to include the manifestation of the wasting syndrome. This increased sensitivity was shown in a hospital study in Abidjan in 1988/9. The WHO clinical case definition based on tuberculosis patients in Abidjan. HIV infection and case definitions for AIDs in patients with neurological disease and Kaposi's sarcoma is also discussed. Recommendations for future action are proposed including surveillance of severe HIV associated disease based on clinical presentation combined with serologic tests of HIV--I or II. The WHO definition with modifications is suggested and the need for strong political and medical commitment to complete and timely reported of AIDs and interventions to control the spread of HIV infection.
    Add to my documents.

Pages