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  1. 1
    375892

    Prevention and control of malaria in pregnancy: reference manual. 3rd edition, 2018 update.

    JHPIEGO

    Baltimore, Maryland, Jhpiego, 2018. 92 p. (USAID Award No. HRN-A-00-98-00043-00; USAID Leader with Associates Cooperative Agreement No.GHS-A-00-04-00002-00)

    The Malaria in Pregnancy reference manual and clinical learning materials are intended for skilled providers who provide antenatal care, including midwives, nurses, clinical officers, and medical assistants. The clinical learning materials can be used to conduct a 2-day workshop designed to provide learners with the knowledge and skills needed to prevent, recognize, and treat malaria in pregnancy as they provide focused antenatal care services.
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  2. 2
    375712

    Statement on maternal sepsis.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Reproductive Health and Research; World Health Organization [WHO]. Human Reproduction Programme [HRP]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2017. 4 p. (WHO/RHR/17.02)

    Strategic approaches to reduce maternal mortality in the past 15 years have mainly focused on clinical interventions and health system strengthening. The greatest attention has been on postpartum haemorrhage and hypertensive disorders, the two leading direct causes of maternal mortality. Further reducing maternal deaths is a priority for achieving the Sustainable Development Goals, implementing the UN Global Strategy for Women’s, Children’s and Adolescents’ Health and critical for the Strategies toward Ending Preventable Maternal Mortality (EPMM). However, the third most common direct cause of maternal mortality, maternal sepsis, received less attention, research and programming. Undetected or poorly managed maternal infections can lead to sepsis, death or disability for the mother and increased likelihood of early neonatal infection and other adverse outcomes. Recognizing the need to foster new thinking and to catalyse greater action to address this important cause of maternal and newborn mortality and morbidity, the World Health Organization (WHO) and Jhpiego have launched the Global Maternal and Neonatal Sepsis Initiative, dedicated to focusing additional effort, energizing stakeholders and accelerating progress in the area of maternal and neonatal infection and sepsis. This statement defines maternal sepsis and operationalizes the definition.
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  3. 3
    375642

    Managing complications in pregnancy and childbirth: a guide for midwives and doctors. Second edition.

    World Health Organization [WHO]; United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]; UNICEF

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2017. 492 p. (Integrated Management Of Pregnancy And Childbirth)

    Since the first edition was published in 2000, the Managing Complications in Pregnancy and Childbirth (MCPC) manual has been used widely around the world to guide the care of women and newborns who have complications during pregnancy, childbirth and the immediate postnatal period. The MCPC manual targets midwives and doctors working in district-level hospitals. Selected chapters from the first edition of the MCPC were revised in 2016 based on new World Health Organization recommendations, resulting in this second edition.
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  4. 4
    373335

    [The results of implementation of the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development Loan Project "Prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of tuberculosis and AIDS", a "tuberculosis" component]

    Tuberkulez I Bolezni Legkikh. 2010; (3):10-7.

    Due to the implementation of the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD) loan project "Prevention, diagnosis, treatment of tuberculosis and AIDS", a "Tuberculosis" component that is an addition to the national tuberculosis control program in 15 subjects of the Russian Federation, followed up by the Central Research Institute of Tuberculosis, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, the 2005-2008 measures stipulated by the Project have caused substantial changes in the organization of tuberculosis control: implementation of Orders Nos. 109, 50, and 690 and supervision of their implementation; modernization of the laboratories of the general medical network and antituberbulosis service (404 kits have been delivered for clinical diagnostic laboratories and 12 for bacteriological laboratories, including BACTEC 960 that has been provided in 6 areas); 91 training seminars have been held at the federal and regional levels; 1492 medical workers have been trained in the detection, diagnosis, and treatment of patients with tuberculosis; 8 manuals and guidelines have been prepared and sent to all areas. In the period 2005-2008, the tuberculosis morbidity and mortality rates in the followed-up areas reduced by 1.2 and 18.6%, respectively. The analysis of patient cohorts in 2007 and 2005 revealed that the therapeutic efficiency evaluated from sputum smear microscopy increased by 16.3%; there were reductions in the proportion of patients having ineffective chemotherapy (from 16.1 to 11.1%), patients who died from tuberculosis (from 11.6 to 9.9%), and those who interrupted therapy ahead of time (from 11.8 to 7.8%). Implementation of the IBR project has contributed to the improvement of the national strategy and the enhancement of the efficiency of tuberculosis control.
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  5. 5
    340313

    Pregnancy management in the context of Zika virus infection. Interim guidance update.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2016 May 13. [14] p. (WHO/ZIKV/MOC/16.2 Rev.1)

    The mosquito vector that carries the Zika virus thrives in warm climates and particularly in areas of poor living conditions. Pregnant women living in or travelling to such areas are at equal risk as the rest of the population of being infected by viruses borne by this vector. Maternal infection with Zika virus may go unnoticed as some people will not develop symptoms. Although Zika virus infection in pregnancy is typically a mild disease, an unusual increase in cases of congenital microcephaly, Guillain-Barré syndrome and other neurological complications in areas where outbreaks have occurred, has significantly raised concern for pregnant women and their families, as well as health providers and policy-makers. The aim of this document is to provide interim guidance for interventions to reduce the risk of maternal Zika virus infection and to manage potential complications during pregnancy. This guidance is based on the best available research evidence and covers areas prioritized by an international, multidisciplinary group of health care professionals and other stakeholders. Specifically, it presents guidance for preventing Zika virus infection; antenatal care and management of women with infection; and care during pregnancy for all pregnant women living in affected areas, with the aim of optimizing health outcomes for mothers and newborns. The guidance is intended to inform the development of national and local clinical protocols and health policies that relate to pregnancy care in the context of Zika virus transmission. It is not intended to provide a comprehensive practical guide for the prevention and management of Zika virus.
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  6. 6
    340891

    Pregnancy management in the context of Zika virus. Interim guidance.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    [Geneva, Switzerland], WHO, 2016 Mar 2. [7] p. (WHO/ZIKV/MOC/16.2)

    The mosquito vector that carries the Zika virus thrives in warm climates and particularly in areas of poor living conditions. Pregnant women living in or travelling to such areas are at equal risk as the rest of the population of being infected by viruses borne by this vector. Maternal infection with Zika virus may go unnoticed as some people will not develop symptoms. Although Zika virus infection in pregnancy is typically a mild disease, an unusual increase in cases of congenital microcephaly, Guillain-Barré syndrome and other neurological complications in areas where outbreaks have occurred, has significantly raised concern for pregnant women and their families, as well as health providers and policy-makers. The aim of this document is to provide interim guidance for interventions to reduce the risk of maternal Zika virus infection and to manage potential complications during pregnancy. This guidance is based on the best available research evidence and covers areas prioritized by an international, multidisciplinary group of health care professionals and other stakeholders. Specifically, it presents guidance for preventing Zika virus infection; antenatal care and management of women with infection; and care during pregnancy for all pregnant women living in affected areas, with the aim of optimizing health outcomes for mothers and newborns. The guidance is intended to inform the development of national and local clinical protocols and health policies that relate to pregnancy care in the context of Zika virus transmission. It is not intended to provide a comprehensive practical guide for the prevention and management of Zika virus infections.
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  7. 7
    340832

    Provisional remarks on Zika virus infection in pregnant women: Document for health care professionals.

    Pan American Health Organization [PAHO]; World Health Organization [WHO]. Regional Office for the Americas

    Montevideo, Uruguay, PAHO, 2016 Jan 25. [22] p.

    The aim of this document is to provide health care professionals in charge of the care of pregnant women with updated information based on the best evidence available for the prevention of infection, timely diagnosis, suggested therapy and monitoring of pregnant women, and notification of cases to the competent health authorities. The information presented in this document was updated on January 22, 2016; it may be further altered if new evidence appears on the effects / consequences of Zika virus Infection in pregnant women and their children. New updates may also be found regularly at www.paho.org/viruszika. (Excerpt)
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  8. 8
    351595
    Peer Reviewed

    [Clinical, epidemiological and microbiological characteristics of a cohort of pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Cali, Colombia] Caracteristicas clinicas, epidemiologicas y microbiologicas de una cohorte de pacientes con tuberculosis pulmonar en Cali, Colombia.

    Rojas CM; Villegas SL; Pineros HM; Chamorro EM; Duran CE; Hernandez EL; Pacheco R; Ferro BE

    Biomedica. 2010 Oct-Dec; 30(4):482-91.

    INTRODUCTION: The World Health Organization recommended strategy for global tuberculosis control is a short-course, clinically administered treatment, This approach has approximately 70% coverage in Colombia. OBJECTIVE: The clinical, epidemiological and microbiological characteristics along with drug therapy outcomes were described in newly diagnosed, pulmonary tuberculosis patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was a descriptive study, conducted as part of a multicenter clinical trial of tuberculosis treatment. A cohort of 106 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis were recruited from several public health facilities in Cali between April 2005 and June 2006. Sputum smear microscopy, culture, drug susceptibility tests to first-line anti-tuberculosis drugs, chest X- ray and HIV-ELISA were performed. Clinical and epidemiological information was collected for each participant. Treatment was administered by the local tuberculosis health facility. Food and transportation incentives were provided during a 30 month follow-up period. RESULTS: The majority of patients were young males with a diagnostic delay longer than 9 weeks and a high sputum smear grade (2+ or 3+). The initial drug resistance was 7.5% for single drug treatment and 1.9% for multidrug treatments. The incidence of adverse events associated with treatment was 8.5%. HIV co-infection was present in 5.7% of the cases. Eighty-six percent of the patients completed the treatment and were considered cured. The radiographic presentation varied within a broad range and differed from the classic progression to cavity formation. CONCLUSION: Delay in tuberculosis diagnosis was identified as a risk factor for treatment compliance failure. The study population had similar baseline epidemiologic characteristics to those described in other cohort studies.
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  9. 9
    326313

    The global elimination of congenital syphilis: rationale and strategy for action.

    Meredith S; Hawkes S; Schmid G; Broutet N

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2007. [45] p.

    Since the advent of penicillin, syphilis is not only preventable but also treatable. Despite this, it remains a global problem with an estimated 12 million people infected each year. Pregnant women who are infected with syphilis can transmit the infection to their fetus, causing congenital syphilis with serious adverse effects on the pregnancy in up to 80% of the cases. Yet simple, cost-effective screening and treatment options could prevent and eventually eliminate congenital syphilis. With the current international focus on the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), there exists a unique opportunity to mobilize action to prevent, and subsequently eliminate, congenital syphilis. Congenital syphilis is a serious but preventable disease, which can be eliminated through effective screening of pregnant women for syphilis and treatment of those infected. More newborn infants are affected by congenital syphilis than by any other neonatal infection, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and tetanus, which are currently receiving global attention. Yet the burden of congenital syphilis is still under-appreciated at both international and national levels. Unlike many neonatal infections, congenital syphilis can be effectively prevented by testing and treatment of pregnant women, which also provides immediate benefits to the mother and allows potentially infected partners to be traced and offered treatment. It has been clearly shown that screening of pregnant women for reactive syphilis serology, followed by treatment of seropositive women, is a cost-effective, inexpensive and feasible intervention for the prevention of congenital syphilis and improvement of child health. In 1995, the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) began a regional campaign to reduce the rate of congenital syphilis in the Americas to less than 50 cases per 100 000 live births. The strategy was to: (1) increase the availability of antenatal care; (2) establish routine serological testing for syphilis during antenatal careand at delivery; and (3) promote the rapid treatment of infected pregnant women. (excerpt)
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  10. 10
    322939
    Peer Reviewed

    WHO global strategy for the prevention and control of sexually transmitted infections: Time for action.

    Lewis DA; Latif AS; Ndowa F

    Sexually Transmitted Infections. 2007; 83:508-509.

    Worldwide, sexually transmitted infections (STIs) continue to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Global estimates suggest that more than 340 million new cases of syphilis, gonorrhoea, chlamydial infection and trichomoniasis occurred throughout the world in 1999. Congenital syphilis, prevention of which is relatively easy and cost-effective, may still be responsible for as many as 14% of neonatal deaths. Up to 10% of those women who are untreated, or inadequately treated, for chlamydial and gonococcal infections may become infertile as a consequence. On a global scale, up to 4000 newborn babies each year may become blind because of gonococcal and chlamydial ophthalmia neonatorum. There is evidence that STIs may enhance both the transmission and acquisition of HIV infection, and that improved control of STIs may slow down HIV transmission. The prevention and control of STIs is not an easy task. Epidemiological patterns of STIs vary geographically and are influenced by cultural, political, economical and social forces. Many affected by STIs are in marginalised vulnerable groups. The asymptomatic nature of some STIs remains a challenge to healthcare providers in areas of the world where laboratory screening tests are unaffordable. (excerpt)
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  11. 11
    322017

    Antiretroviral therapy for HIV infection in infants and children: towards universal access. Recommendations for a public health approach.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of HIV / AIDS

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2007. [147] p.

    These stand-alone treatment guidelines serve as a framework for selecting the most potent and feasible first-line and second-line ARV regimens as components of expanded national responses for the care of HIV-infected infants and children. Recommendations are provided on: diagnosing HIV infection in infants and children; when to start ART, including situations where severe HIV disease in children less than 18 months of age has been presumptively diagnosed; clinical and laboratory monitoring of ART; substitution of ARVs for toxicities. The guidelines consider ART in different situations, e.g. where infants and children are coinfected with HIV and TB or have been exposed to ARVs either for the prevention of MTCT (PMTCT) or because of breastfeeding from an HIV-infected mother on ART. They address the importance of nutrition in the HIV-infected child and of severe malnutrition in relation to the provision of ART. Adherence to therapy and viral resistance to ARVs are both discussed with reference to infants and children. A section on ART in adolescents briefly outlines key issues related to treatment in this age group. (excerpt)
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  12. 12
    319155
    Peer Reviewed

    IAP Guidelines 2006 on hospital based management of severely malnourished children (adapted from the WHO guidelines).

    Bhatnagar S; Lodha R; Choudhury P; Sachdev HP; Shah N

    Indian Pediatrics. 2007 Jun 17; 44(6):443-461.

    Malnutrition in children is widely prevalent in India. It is estimated that 57 million children are underweight (moderate and severe). More than 50% of deaths in 0-4 years are associated with malnutrition. The median case fatality rate is approximately 23.5% in severe malnutrition, reaching 50% in edematous malnutrition. There is a need for standardized protocol-based management to improve the outcome of severely malnourished children. In 2006, Indian Academy of Pediatrics undertook the task of developing guidelines for the management of severely malnourished children based on adaptation from the WHO guidelines. We summarize below the revised consensus recommendations (and wherever relevant the rationale) of the group. (excerpt)
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  13. 13
    318283

    A research agenda for childhood tuberculosis. Improving the management of childhood tuberculosis within national tuberculosis programmes: research priorities based on a literature review.

    Donald P; Maher D; Qazi S

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2007. [123] p. (WHO/HTM/TB/2007.381; WHO/FCH/CAH/07.02)

    Childhood TB is a neglected aspect of the TB epidemic, despite constituting 20% or more of the TB case-load in many countries with high TB incidence. This "orphan disease" exists in the shadow of adult TB and is a significant child health problem, but is neglected because it is usually smear-negative and is thus considered to make a relatively minor contribution to the spread of TB. In order to redress this neglect and integrate childhood TB into the mainstream of TB control activities, research priorities are identified that will assist in improving the prevention and management of childhood TB as a part of national TB programmes (NTPs). The proposed research agenda seeks to better define childhood TB, to optimize the treatment of childhood TB and to identify the best management practices by which childhood TB can be accurately documented and recorded, and efficiently managed within NTPs. (excerpt)
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  14. 14
    316012

    Integrated management of childhood illness: An emphasis on the management of infectious diseases.

    Benguigui Y; Stein F

    Seminars in Pediatric Infectious Diseases. 2006 Apr; 17(2):80-98.

    The Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) strategy has helped strengthen the application and expand coverage of key child survival interventions aimed at preventing deaths from infectious disease, respiratory illness, and malnutrition, whether at the health services, in the community, or at home. IMCI covers the prevention, treatment, and follow-up of the leading causes of mortality, which are responsible for at least two-thirds of deaths of children younger than 5 years in the countries of the Americas. The IMCI clinical guidelines take an evidence-based, syndrome approach to case management that supports the rational, effective, and affordable use of drugs and diagnostic tools. When clinical resources are limited, the syndrome approach is a more realistic and cost-effective way to manage patients. Careful and systematic assessment of common symptoms and well-selected clinical signs provide sufficient information to guide effective actions. (author's)
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  15. 15
    312718

    The Stop TB Partnership in South Africa: a review.

    Barr D; Padarath A; Salt L

    Durban, South Africa, Health Systems Trust, 2004. 61 p.

    This case study presents an overview of the Stop TB Partnership operating in the South African context. It offers an analysis of the activities and impact of the Partnership in South Africa. Its overarching objective is to collect a set of baseline data on the functioning and operational aspects of the Partnership and to assess whether such initiatives contribute to the development of equitable health services in the public health sector. Tuberculosis is a priority disease in South Africa: the cure rate for new patients of 64% is still way below the World Health Organization (WHO) target of 85%. In some provinces, the cure rate is as low as 40%. The estimated incidence of TB per 100 000 population is 526, and an estimated 60% of adults with TB are also HIV positive. South Africa is ranked third in the WHO AFRO region by the number of TB cases, and ninth globally. Funded by WEMOS, this review is part of a multi-country study. It aims to augment the existing body of knowledge on Global Public Private Initiatives in Health (GPPIs) and to generate a body of country-based evidence relating to the effect of GPPIs on health policies and health systems. (excerpt)
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  16. 16
    312290

    Guidance for national tuberculosis programmes on the management of tuberculosis in children.

    Bjune G; Cotton M; El Sony A; Gie R; Graham S

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2006. [49] p. (WHO/HTM/ TB/2006.371; WHO/FCH/CAH/2006.7)

    This document complements existing national and international guidelines and standards for managing TB, many of which include guidance on children. It fills the gaps in the existing materials and provides current recommendations based on the best available evidence. National and regional TB control programmes may wish to revise and adapt this guidance according to local circumstances. This document reflects two important recent policy changes. Firstly, NTPs should record and report two age groups for children (0--4 years and 5--14 years) using the quarterly reporting form. Routine reporting of these two age groups has considerable benefits. Enumerating children with TB is a key step in bringing their management into the mainstream of the Stop TB Strategy as part of routine NTP activities. This age breakdown is crucial in ordering drugs (since child-friendly formulations are particularly important in children aged 0--4 years) and in monitoring of trends in these two distinct age groups (since children aged 0--4 years are the most vulnerable and infection at these early ages indicates recent transmission). In addition, routine NTP data collection will provide valuable and sustainable information on market needs concerning child-friendly formulations of anti-TB drugs. Secondly, the revised recommended dose of ethambutol is now 20 mg/kg (range 15--25 mg/kg) daily. Although ethambutol was previously often omitted from treatment regimens for children, due in part to concerns about toxicity (particularly optic neuritis), a literature review indicates that it is safe in children at this dose. (excerpt)
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  17. 17
    310375
    Peer Reviewed

    Health professionals must confront HIV / AIDS. From the World Health Organization.

    Brundtland GH

    JAMA. 2001 Sep 26; 286(12):1444.

    The 20th anniversary of the first diagnosis of HIV infection has come and gone. So has the razzmatazz surrounding the UN General Assembly's Special Session on AIDS in June. Headlines made when UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan appealed for the world to act on the global emergency AIDS represents have been superseded by other events. It's back to business as usual. Or is it? It must not be. The AIDS crisis is as real now as a few months ago, and it will continue to grow unless the world is constantly reminded of it and plans to stem the epidemic are turned into action. The recent focus on AIDS among the poorest countries of the world--in particular in Africa--may have given an impression that those who live in countries with stable or declining infection rates no longer need to worry. Recent infection figures in the United States showing disturbing increases in some population groups prove this is not so. And the effects of globalization mean that there no longer is such a thing as a localized health problem. The HIV/AIDS epidemic is a global emergency and it calls for global commitment and action. UN Secretary-General Annan recently asserted that "AIDS can no longer do its deadly work in the dark. The world has started to wake up." Frighteningly, it has taken 22 million deaths and 13 million orphaned children to act as a global alarm clock. Today, there are 36 million people living with HIV/AIDS. (author's)
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  18. 18
    303117

    Mass treatment of syphilis in an Indian province.

    Cutler JC; Kvittingen J; Rose E; McCullough JC

    Bulletin of the World Health Organization. 1952; 5:377-439.

    This report deals with some of the experiences of the World Health Organization Venereal Disease Demonstration Team assigned to the Government of India to establish a suitable system of control in both an urban and rural area and to give instruction in those methods of diagnosis and treatment which could best be adapted to local resources. The WHO Expert Committee on Venereal Diseases believed that the method of control developed in the United States of America could be applied usefully in many areas of the world, if suitably adapted to local conditions and requirements. The committee suggested that the team's activities should embrace both rural and urban populations. The importance of working in rural areas is particularly evident in India where, in 1941, 87% of the population was rural and a serious shortage of medical care prevailed. The expert committee believed that proved techniques could be adapted to provide venereal-disease care for this rural group within the budgetary and personnel limitations of the medical services of the country. (excerpt)
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  19. 19
    298767
    Peer Reviewed

    The Global Plan to Stop TB: a unique opportunity to address poverty and the Millennium Development Goals.

    Squire SB; Obasi A; Nhlema-Simwaka B

    Lancet. 2006 Mar 18; 367(9514):955-957.

    The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) provide the guiding framework within which the Stop TB Partnership's Second Global Plan to Stop TB has been conceived, and poverty is rightly recognised as a key cross-cutting issue for tuberculosis control. This explicit pro-poor focus, although important in itself, will only make a difference to the individual lives of the poor if practical steps are taken to address the obstacles that these people face in accessing good tuberculosis services, and if programme implementation takes account of the distribution of poverty within target communities as a whole. That the Plan goes beyond the rhetoric and lays out the practical steps that tuberculosis programmes can take to address poverty is encouraging (panel). (excerpt)
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  20. 20
    298766
    Peer Reviewed

    WHO's new Stop TB Strategy.

    Raviglione MC; Uplekar MW

    Lancet. 2006 Mar 18; 367(9514):952-955.

    Government commitment, diagnosis through microscopy, standardised and supervised treatment, uninterrupted drug supply, and regular monitoring, which together constitute DOTS--the WHO recommended tuberculosis control strategy--are all essential for controlling tuberculosis. DOTS has helped make remarkable progress in global control of the disease over the past decade. The gain is evident: nearly 20 million patients have been cured of tuberculosis. However, global statistics suggest that DOTS alone is not sufficient to achieve the 2015 tuberculosis-related Millennium Development Goals (MDG) and the Stop TB Partnership targets. The need for a new strategy that builds on, and goes beyond, DOTS has also been recognised by the Second Ad-hoc Committee on the Global TB Epidemic and the 2005 World Health Assembly. (excerpt)
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  21. 21
    298765
    Peer Reviewed

    Progress of DOTS in global tuberculosis control.

    Sharma SK; Liu JJ

    Lancet. 2006 Mar 18; 367(9514):951-952.

    In the early 1990s, the global public-health community woke up to the reality that despite the availability of effective diagnostic and therapeutic tools, tuberculosis was one of the world's leading killers. The strategy that was subsequently devised, DOTS, was based on decades-old principles and technologies, but was engendered by new energy and political will (panel); the aim, to achieve 70% case detection and 85% cure rate by 2005. Although these goals were not achieved on a global scale and implementation of the programme has been patchy and sporadic in places, overall its roll-out has been rapid and effective. That said, DOTS can only be the foundation for global tuberculosis control; to truly contain the disease, much more is needed in the control of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and the development of drugs, diagnostics, and vaccines. (excerpt)
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  22. 22
    293308

    Integrated management of childhood.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Division of Child Health and Development; UNICEF

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, Division of Child Health and Development, 2002 Sep 3. 34 p.

    CHECK FOR GENERAL DANGER SIGNS: ASK: Is the child able to drink or breastfeed? Does the child vomit everything? Has the child had convulsions? LOOK: See if the child is lethargic or unconscious. (excerpt)
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  23. 23
    290366

    Interim WHO clinical staging of HIV / AIDS and HIV / AIDS case definitions for surveillance. African region.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2005. [46] p. (WHO/HIV/2005.02)

    With a view to facilitating the scale-up of access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the African Region the present document outlines recent revisions made by WHO to the clinical staging of HIV/AIDS and to case definitions for HIV/AIDS disease surveillance. These interim guidelines are based on an international drafting meeting held in Saas Fee in June 2004 and on recommendations made by experts from African countries at a meeting held in Nairobi in December of the same year. The revisions to the clinical staging target professionals ranging from senior consultants in teaching and referral hospitals to surveillance officers and first-level health care providers, all of whom have important roles in caring for people living with HIV and AIDS (PLWHA), including children. It is proposed that countries review, adapt and repackage the guidelines as appropriate for specific tasks at different levels of health service delivery. It is hoped that national HIV/ AIDS programmes in African countries will thus be assisted to develop, revise or strengthen their ART guidelines, patient monitoring and surveillance efforts. The interim clinical staging and revised definitions for surveillance are currently being reviewed in the other WHO regions and will be finalized at a global meeting to be held in September 2005. (excerpt)
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  24. 24
    282172

    Guidelines for the management of sexually transmitted infections in female sex workers.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Regional Office for the Western Pacific

    Manila, Philippines, WHO, Regional Office for the Western Pacific, STI, HIV and AIDS Focus, 2002 Jul. [99] p.

    Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are infectious diseases that are transmitted from person to person during sexual contact, not necessarily vaginal intercourse. A large number of bacteria, viruses, fungi and other organisms may be sexually transmissible and may result in disease. Most bacterial, fungal and parasitic infections can be cured with antimicrobial agents. On the other hand, most viral infections cannot be cured. Antiviral drugs can sometimes contain the progression or effects of viral infections, although such treatments are often expensive, are inaccessible to many individuals, and may have substantial side effects. Persons with sexually transmitted infections are infectious to their sexual partners even though they may have no symptoms or signs of infection. In fact, many people - men and women - have STIs without symptoms or signs, although they can develop serious complications. STIs are a public health problem because of their potential to cause serious complications such as infertility, chronic disability and death in men, women and children. STIs can affect the foetus, neonate and infant, resulting in eye infection, blindness and pneumonia. The public health importance of STIs has taken on an even greater dimension with the advent of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. HIV infection is sexually transmissible, is not curable and leads to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). (excerpt)
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  25. 25
    192085

    Acute care. Interim guidelines for first-level facility health workers.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Integrated Management of Adolescent and Adult Illness [IMAI]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2004 Jan. 118 p. (Integrated Management of Adolescent and Adult Illness [IMAI] No. 1; WHO/CDS/IMAI/2004.1)

    The IMAI guidelines are aimed at first-level facility health workers and lay providers in low-resource settings. These health workers and lay providers may be working in a health centre or as part of a clinical team at the district clinic. The clinical guidelines have been simplified and systematized so that they can be used by nurses, clinical aids, and other multi-purpose health workers, working in good communication with a supervising MD/MO at the district clinic. Acute Care presents a syndromic approach to the most common adult illnesses including most opportunistic infections. Instructions are provided so the health worker knows which patients can be managed at the first-level facility and which require referral to the district hospital or further assessment by a more senior clinician. Preparing first-level facility health workers to treat the common, less severe opportunistic infections will allow them to stabilize many clinical stage 3 and 4 patients prior to ARV therapy without referral to the district. (excerpt)
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