Important: The POPLINE website will retire on September 1, 2019. Click here to read about the transition.

Your search found 4 Results

  1. 1
    323652

    WHO information note on the use of dual HIV/Syphilis rapid diagnostic tests (RDT).

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Reproductive Health and Research

    Geneva Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2017. 8 p. (Information Note; WHO/RHR/17.01)

    This information note provides interim advice for countries using or planning to introduce dual HIV/syphilis rapid diagnostic test (RDT) in antenatal services and other testing sites pending forthcoming WHO programmatic guidance, including a WHO recommended testing strategy. This note also emphasizes the need to ensure the quality of HIV and syphilis testing using RDTs, as well as laboratory-based testing, to avoid false positive and false negative HIV and syphilis results
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    326313

    The global elimination of congenital syphilis: rationale and strategy for action.

    Meredith S; Hawkes S; Schmid G; Broutet N

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2007. [45] p.

    Since the advent of penicillin, syphilis is not only preventable but also treatable. Despite this, it remains a global problem with an estimated 12 million people infected each year. Pregnant women who are infected with syphilis can transmit the infection to their fetus, causing congenital syphilis with serious adverse effects on the pregnancy in up to 80% of the cases. Yet simple, cost-effective screening and treatment options could prevent and eventually eliminate congenital syphilis. With the current international focus on the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), there exists a unique opportunity to mobilize action to prevent, and subsequently eliminate, congenital syphilis. Congenital syphilis is a serious but preventable disease, which can be eliminated through effective screening of pregnant women for syphilis and treatment of those infected. More newborn infants are affected by congenital syphilis than by any other neonatal infection, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and tetanus, which are currently receiving global attention. Yet the burden of congenital syphilis is still under-appreciated at both international and national levels. Unlike many neonatal infections, congenital syphilis can be effectively prevented by testing and treatment of pregnant women, which also provides immediate benefits to the mother and allows potentially infected partners to be traced and offered treatment. It has been clearly shown that screening of pregnant women for reactive syphilis serology, followed by treatment of seropositive women, is a cost-effective, inexpensive and feasible intervention for the prevention of congenital syphilis and improvement of child health. In 1995, the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) began a regional campaign to reduce the rate of congenital syphilis in the Americas to less than 50 cases per 100 000 live births. The strategy was to: (1) increase the availability of antenatal care; (2) establish routine serological testing for syphilis during antenatal careand at delivery; and (3) promote the rapid treatment of infected pregnant women. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  3. 3
    312289

    The use of rapid syphilis tests.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases. Sexually Transmitted Diseases Diagnostics Initiative

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases [TDR], 2006. 25 p. (TDR/SDI/06.1.)

    Syphilis is a curable infection caused by a bacterium called Treponema pallidum. This infection is sexually transmitted, and can also be passed on from a mother to her fetus during pregnancy. As a cause of genital ulcer disease, syphilis has been associated with an increased risk of HIV transmission and acquisition. Most persons with syphilis tend to be unaware of their infection and they can transmit the infection to their sexual contacts or, in the case of a pregnant woman, to her unborn child. If left untreated, syphilis can cause serious consequences such as stillbirth, prematurity and neonatal deaths. Adverse outcomes of pregnancy are preventable if the infection is detected and treated before mid-second trimester. Early detection and treatment is also critical in preventing severe long term complications in the patient and onward transmission to sexual partners. Congenital syphilis kills more than one million babies a year worldwide but is preventable if infected mothers are identified and treated appropriately as early as possible. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  4. 4
    303117

    Mass treatment of syphilis in an Indian province.

    Cutler JC; Kvittingen J; Rose E; McCullough JC

    Bulletin of the World Health Organization. 1952; 5:377-439.

    This report deals with some of the experiences of the World Health Organization Venereal Disease Demonstration Team assigned to the Government of India to establish a suitable system of control in both an urban and rural area and to give instruction in those methods of diagnosis and treatment which could best be adapted to local resources. The WHO Expert Committee on Venereal Diseases believed that the method of control developed in the United States of America could be applied usefully in many areas of the world, if suitably adapted to local conditions and requirements. The committee suggested that the team's activities should embrace both rural and urban populations. The importance of working in rural areas is particularly evident in India where, in 1941, 87% of the population was rural and a serious shortage of medical care prevailed. The expert committee believed that proved techniques could be adapted to provide venereal-disease care for this rural group within the budgetary and personnel limitations of the medical services of the country. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.