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  1. 1
    322939
    Peer Reviewed

    WHO global strategy for the prevention and control of sexually transmitted infections: Time for action.

    Lewis DA; Latif AS; Ndowa F

    Sexually Transmitted Infections. 2007; 83:508-509.

    Worldwide, sexually transmitted infections (STIs) continue to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Global estimates suggest that more than 340 million new cases of syphilis, gonorrhoea, chlamydial infection and trichomoniasis occurred throughout the world in 1999. Congenital syphilis, prevention of which is relatively easy and cost-effective, may still be responsible for as many as 14% of neonatal deaths. Up to 10% of those women who are untreated, or inadequately treated, for chlamydial and gonococcal infections may become infertile as a consequence. On a global scale, up to 4000 newborn babies each year may become blind because of gonococcal and chlamydial ophthalmia neonatorum. There is evidence that STIs may enhance both the transmission and acquisition of HIV infection, and that improved control of STIs may slow down HIV transmission. The prevention and control of STIs is not an easy task. Epidemiological patterns of STIs vary geographically and are influenced by cultural, political, economical and social forces. Many affected by STIs are in marginalised vulnerable groups. The asymptomatic nature of some STIs remains a challenge to healthcare providers in areas of the world where laboratory screening tests are unaffordable. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    282172

    Guidelines for the management of sexually transmitted infections in female sex workers.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Regional Office for the Western Pacific

    Manila, Philippines, WHO, Regional Office for the Western Pacific, STI, HIV and AIDS Focus, 2002 Jul. [99] p.

    Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are infectious diseases that are transmitted from person to person during sexual contact, not necessarily vaginal intercourse. A large number of bacteria, viruses, fungi and other organisms may be sexually transmissible and may result in disease. Most bacterial, fungal and parasitic infections can be cured with antimicrobial agents. On the other hand, most viral infections cannot be cured. Antiviral drugs can sometimes contain the progression or effects of viral infections, although such treatments are often expensive, are inaccessible to many individuals, and may have substantial side effects. Persons with sexually transmitted infections are infectious to their sexual partners even though they may have no symptoms or signs of infection. In fact, many people - men and women - have STIs without symptoms or signs, although they can develop serious complications. STIs are a public health problem because of their potential to cause serious complications such as infertility, chronic disability and death in men, women and children. STIs can affect the foetus, neonate and infant, resulting in eye infection, blindness and pneumonia. The public health importance of STIs has taken on an even greater dimension with the advent of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. HIV infection is sexually transmissible, is not curable and leads to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). (excerpt)
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