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    Guidelines for the management of sexually transmitted infections in female sex workers.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Regional Office for the Western Pacific

    Manila, Philippines, WHO, Regional Office for the Western Pacific, STI, HIV and AIDS Focus, 2002 Jul. [99] p.

    Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are infectious diseases that are transmitted from person to person during sexual contact, not necessarily vaginal intercourse. A large number of bacteria, viruses, fungi and other organisms may be sexually transmissible and may result in disease. Most bacterial, fungal and parasitic infections can be cured with antimicrobial agents. On the other hand, most viral infections cannot be cured. Antiviral drugs can sometimes contain the progression or effects of viral infections, although such treatments are often expensive, are inaccessible to many individuals, and may have substantial side effects. Persons with sexually transmitted infections are infectious to their sexual partners even though they may have no symptoms or signs of infection. In fact, many people - men and women - have STIs without symptoms or signs, although they can develop serious complications. STIs are a public health problem because of their potential to cause serious complications such as infertility, chronic disability and death in men, women and children. STIs can affect the foetus, neonate and infant, resulting in eye infection, blindness and pneumonia. The public health importance of STIs has taken on an even greater dimension with the advent of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. HIV infection is sexually transmissible, is not curable and leads to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). (excerpt)
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