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  1. 1
    298760
    Peer Reviewed

    Progress towards improved tuberculosis diagnostics for developing countries.

    Perkins MD; Roscigno G; Zumla A

    Lancet. 2006 Mar 18; 367(9514):942-943.

    The lack of accurate, robust, and rapid diagnostics for tuberculosis impedes management of patients and disease control. For individual patients, the cost, complexity, and potential toxicity of 6 months of standard treatment demands certainty in diagnosis. For communities, the risk of transmission from undetected cases requires widespread access to diagnostic services and early detection. Unfortunately, diagnostic services in most places where tuberculosis is endemic fail both the individual and the community. Patients are often diagnosed after weeks to months of waiting, at substantial cost to themselves, and at huge cost to society. Many patients are never diagnosed, and contribute to the astonishing number of yearly deaths from tuberculosis worldwide. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    113439

    International Planned Parenthood Federation medical and service delivery guidelines for family planning.

    Huezo CM; Briggs C

    London, England, International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF], 1992. xviii, 169 p.

    The International Planned Parenthood Federation has developed these guidelines to help persons working in family planning services and education ensure adequate levels of quality of care. The guidelines conform to the three dimensions of technology assessment needed for any project: it must be scientifically, socially, and operationally sound. Providers should adapt the service delivery guidelines to local realities. They should consider the needs and resources of the various sites in which the guidelines will be applied. The guidelines can also be developed into educational and training materials. They serve as a guide to the delivery of family planning services, a reference document for assessing quality of care, a training instrument, and a tool for supervision. The first chapter addresses the rights of the client, ranging from the right to information to the right of opinion. The second chapter is dedicated to contraceptive counseling, while chapter 3 is dedicated to family planning training. Chapter 4 discusses hormonal contraception (combined oral contraceptives, progestagen-only pills, service management, progestagen-only injectables, and the subdermal implants, Norplant). IUDs are covered in detail in chapter 5. The barrier methods addressed in chapter 6 include condoms, diaphragms, cervical caps, and spermicides. Chapter 7 covers both male and female voluntary surgical contraception. Natural family planning methods are addressed in chapter 8 entitled Periodic Abstinence. These methods include the basal body temperature method, the cervical mucus method (Billings method), the calendar or rhythm method, and the sympto-thermal method. The guidelines conclude with a detailed statement on diagnosis of pregnancy and a list of suggested reading material.
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