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  1. 1
    333326

    The Treatment 2.0 Framework for Action: Catalysing the next phase of treatment, care and support.

    World Health Organization [WHO]; Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2011. [32] p.

    In June 2010, the UNAIDS Secretariat and WHO launched Treatment 2.0, an initiative designed to achieve and sustain universal access and maximize the preventive benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Treatment 2.0 builds on '3 by 5' and the programmatic and clinical evidence and experience over the last 10 years to expand access to HIV diagnosis, treatment and care through a series of innovations in five priority work areas: drugs, diagnostics, costs, service delivery and community mobilization. The principles and priorities of Treatment 2.0 address the need for innovation and efficiency gains in HIV programmes, in greater effectiveness, intervention coverage and impact in terms of both HIV-specific and broader health outcomes. Since the launch of Treatment 2.0, the UNAIDS Secretariat and WHO have worked with other UNAIDS co-sponsoring organizations, technical experts and global partners to further elaborate and begin implementing Treatment 2.0. The Treatment 2.0 Framework for Action outlines the five priority work areas which comprise the core elements of the initiative and establishes a strategic framework to guide action within each of them over the next decade. The Framework for Action reflects commitments outlined in Getting to Zero: 2011 - 2015 Strategy, UNAIDS and the WHO Global Health-Sector Strategy on HIV, 2011 - 2015, the guiding strategies for the multi-sectoral and health-sector responses to the HIV pandemic. (Excerpt)
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  2. 2
    312718

    The Stop TB Partnership in South Africa: a review.

    Barr D; Padarath A; Salt L

    Durban, South Africa, Health Systems Trust, 2004. 61 p.

    This case study presents an overview of the Stop TB Partnership operating in the South African context. It offers an analysis of the activities and impact of the Partnership in South Africa. Its overarching objective is to collect a set of baseline data on the functioning and operational aspects of the Partnership and to assess whether such initiatives contribute to the development of equitable health services in the public health sector. Tuberculosis is a priority disease in South Africa: the cure rate for new patients of 64% is still way below the World Health Organization (WHO) target of 85%. In some provinces, the cure rate is as low as 40%. The estimated incidence of TB per 100 000 population is 526, and an estimated 60% of adults with TB are also HIV positive. South Africa is ranked third in the WHO AFRO region by the number of TB cases, and ninth globally. Funded by WEMOS, this review is part of a multi-country study. It aims to augment the existing body of knowledge on Global Public Private Initiatives in Health (GPPIs) and to generate a body of country-based evidence relating to the effect of GPPIs on health policies and health systems. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    310375
    Peer Reviewed

    Health professionals must confront HIV / AIDS. From the World Health Organization.

    Brundtland GH

    JAMA. 2001 Sep 26; 286(12):1444.

    The 20th anniversary of the first diagnosis of HIV infection has come and gone. So has the razzmatazz surrounding the UN General Assembly's Special Session on AIDS in June. Headlines made when UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan appealed for the world to act on the global emergency AIDS represents have been superseded by other events. It's back to business as usual. Or is it? It must not be. The AIDS crisis is as real now as a few months ago, and it will continue to grow unless the world is constantly reminded of it and plans to stem the epidemic are turned into action. The recent focus on AIDS among the poorest countries of the world--in particular in Africa--may have given an impression that those who live in countries with stable or declining infection rates no longer need to worry. Recent infection figures in the United States showing disturbing increases in some population groups prove this is not so. And the effects of globalization mean that there no longer is such a thing as a localized health problem. The HIV/AIDS epidemic is a global emergency and it calls for global commitment and action. UN Secretary-General Annan recently asserted that "AIDS can no longer do its deadly work in the dark. The world has started to wake up." Frighteningly, it has taken 22 million deaths and 13 million orphaned children to act as a global alarm clock. Today, there are 36 million people living with HIV/AIDS. (author's)
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  4. 4
    281425

    Protecting young people from HIV and AIDS: the role of health services.

    McIntyre P

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2004 Dec. [41] p.

    There is an urgent need to define at country level an essential package of interventions that can be delivered through health services to meet the needs of young people. This document summarizes the evidence for effective action, and encourages policy makers and programmers to turn concern and commitment into effective and sustainable action. It is based on an understanding that HIV infects people when they are young, but AIDS affects and kills people at an age when they would be parents and workers who sustain society and domestic and family life. Helping young people to protect themselves against HIV and AIDS protects people now and in the future. It protects the future of family life and the economic prospects of countries in development. (excerpt)
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