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Your search found 7 Results

  1. 1
    375796

    World malaria report 2017.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2017. 196 p.

    The World malaria report, published annually, provides a comprehensive update on global and regional malaria data and trends. The latest report, released on 29 November 2017, tracks investments in malaria programmes and research as well as progress across all intervention areas: prevention, diagnosis, treatment and surveillance. It also includes dedicated chapters on malaria elimination and on key threats in the fight against malaria. The report is based on information received from national malaria control programmes and other partners in endemic countries; most of the data presented is from 2016.
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  2. 2
    375280

    World Malaria Report 2016.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2016. 186 p.

    The World Health Organization’s (WHO) World Malaria Report 2016 reveals that children and pregnant women in sub-Saharan Africa have greater access to effective malaria control. Across the region, a steep increase in diagnostic testing for children and preventive treatment for pregnant women has been reported over the last five years. Among all populations at risk of malaria, the use of insecticide-treated nets has expanded rapidly. But in many countries in the region, substantial gaps in programme coverage remain. Funding shortfalls and fragile health systems are undermining overall progress, jeopardizing the attainment of global targets.
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  3. 3
    335021

    Report of the Director General of the World Health Organization. Implementation of General Assembly resolution 66/289 on consolidating gains and accelerating efforts to control and eliminate malaria in developing countries, particularly in Africa, by 2015.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Director-General

    [New York, New York], United Nations, General Assembly, 2013 Apr 5. [19] p. (A/67/825)

    The present report is submitted in response to General Assembly resolution 66/289. It provides a review of progress in the implementation of that resolution, focusing on the adoption and scaling-up of interventions recommended by the World Health Organization in 99 countries with ongoing malaria transmission and key challenges impeding progress, including a shortfall in financing for malaria control globally. It provides an assessment of progress towards the 2015 global malaria targets, including Millennium Development Goal 6, targets set through the African Union and the World Health Assembly and goals set through the Global Malaria Action Plan of the Roll Back Malaria Partnership. It elaborates on the challenges limiting the full achievement of the targets and provides recommendations to ensure that progress is accelerated up to and beyond 2015.
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  4. 4
    322939
    Peer Reviewed

    WHO global strategy for the prevention and control of sexually transmitted infections: Time for action.

    Lewis DA; Latif AS; Ndowa F

    Sexually Transmitted Infections. 2007; 83:508-509.

    Worldwide, sexually transmitted infections (STIs) continue to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Global estimates suggest that more than 340 million new cases of syphilis, gonorrhoea, chlamydial infection and trichomoniasis occurred throughout the world in 1999. Congenital syphilis, prevention of which is relatively easy and cost-effective, may still be responsible for as many as 14% of neonatal deaths. Up to 10% of those women who are untreated, or inadequately treated, for chlamydial and gonococcal infections may become infertile as a consequence. On a global scale, up to 4000 newborn babies each year may become blind because of gonococcal and chlamydial ophthalmia neonatorum. There is evidence that STIs may enhance both the transmission and acquisition of HIV infection, and that improved control of STIs may slow down HIV transmission. The prevention and control of STIs is not an easy task. Epidemiological patterns of STIs vary geographically and are influenced by cultural, political, economical and social forces. Many affected by STIs are in marginalised vulnerable groups. The asymptomatic nature of some STIs remains a challenge to healthcare providers in areas of the world where laboratory screening tests are unaffordable. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    319155
    Peer Reviewed

    IAP Guidelines 2006 on hospital based management of severely malnourished children (adapted from the WHO guidelines).

    Bhatnagar S; Lodha R; Choudhury P; Sachdev HP; Shah N

    Indian Pediatrics. 2007 Jun 17; 44(6):443-461.

    Malnutrition in children is widely prevalent in India. It is estimated that 57 million children are underweight (moderate and severe). More than 50% of deaths in 0-4 years are associated with malnutrition. The median case fatality rate is approximately 23.5% in severe malnutrition, reaching 50% in edematous malnutrition. There is a need for standardized protocol-based management to improve the outcome of severely malnourished children. In 2006, Indian Academy of Pediatrics undertook the task of developing guidelines for the management of severely malnourished children based on adaptation from the WHO guidelines. We summarize below the revised consensus recommendations (and wherever relevant the rationale) of the group. (excerpt)
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  6. 6
    290366

    Interim WHO clinical staging of HIV / AIDS and HIV / AIDS case definitions for surveillance. African region.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2005. [46] p. (WHO/HIV/2005.02)

    With a view to facilitating the scale-up of access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the African Region the present document outlines recent revisions made by WHO to the clinical staging of HIV/AIDS and to case definitions for HIV/AIDS disease surveillance. These interim guidelines are based on an international drafting meeting held in Saas Fee in June 2004 and on recommendations made by experts from African countries at a meeting held in Nairobi in December of the same year. The revisions to the clinical staging target professionals ranging from senior consultants in teaching and referral hospitals to surveillance officers and first-level health care providers, all of whom have important roles in caring for people living with HIV and AIDS (PLWHA), including children. It is proposed that countries review, adapt and repackage the guidelines as appropriate for specific tasks at different levels of health service delivery. It is hoped that national HIV/ AIDS programmes in African countries will thus be assisted to develop, revise or strengthen their ART guidelines, patient monitoring and surveillance efforts. The interim clinical staging and revised definitions for surveillance are currently being reviewed in the other WHO regions and will be finalized at a global meeting to be held in September 2005. (excerpt)
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  7. 7
    108359

    Surveillance of STD patients for AIDS using World Health Organisation criteria.

    Khan MA; Giri TK; Mishra NM; Kailash S; Meena HS

    JOURNAL OF COMMUNICABLE DISEASES. 1994 Dec; 26(4):231-2.

    The World Health Organization (WHO) criteria for HIV clinical disease were tested among individuals with high-risk behavior in northern India. A questionnaire, based upon history and physical examination alone, standardized by the WHO to include both major and minor signs necessary for the clinical diagnosis of AIDS in adults was applied to 165 consecutive patients attending the STD clinic of Dr. R.M.L. Hospital, New Delhi. All patients were screened for the presence of STDs by the dermatologist in charge of the clinic, with patients fulfilling two major and at least two minor WHO criteria eventually classified as having clinical AIDS based upon the WHO case definition. Each of those patients was subjected to serological confirmation of the clinical suspicion using ELISA and Western blot commercial tests. Of the 165 patients screened, a definite diagnosis of STD was possible in 85. These patients were 20-45 years old (mean age, 30.59 years). All were male and chancroid was the most common STD in the cohort. Of the 85, only one satisfied the WHO clinical criteria for AIDS. Serological investigations, ELISA, and Western blot confirmed the subject's HIV-seropositive status. These results indicate that in northern India, clinical HIV disease remains rare even among individuals with high-risk behavior. The low prevalence of clinical HIV disease in that part of the country makes it difficult to assess the specificity and sensitivity of the WHO clinical criteria for AIDS.
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