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  1. 1
    068551

    USAID steps up anti-AIDS program.

    USAID HIGHLIGHTS. 1991 Fall; 8(3):1-4.

    This article considers the epidemic proportion of AIDS in developing countries, and discusses the U.S. Agency for International Development's (USAID) reworked and intensified strategy for HIV infection and AIDS prevention and control over the next 5 years. Developing and launching over 650 HIV and AIDS activities in 74 developing countries since 1986, USAID is the world's largest supporter of anti-AIDS programs. Over $91 million in bilateral assistance for HIV and AIDS prevention and control have been committed. USAID has also been the largest supporter of the World Health Organization's Global Program on AIDS since 1986. Interventions have included training peer educators, working to change the norms of sex behavior, and condom promotion. Recognizing that the developing world will increasingly account for an ever larger share of the world's HIV-infected population, USAID announced an intensified program of estimated investment increasing to approximately $400 million over a 5-year period. Strategy include funding for long-term, intensive interventions in 10-15 priority countries, emphasizing the treatment of other sexually transmitted diseases which facilitate the spread of HIV, making AIDS-related policy dialogue an explicit component of the Agency's AIDS program, and augmenting funding to community-based programs aimed at reducing high-risk sexual behaviors. The effect of AIDS upon child survival, adult mortality, urban populations, and socioeconomic development in developing countries is discussed. Program examples are also presented.
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  2. 2
    049147

    Report of the WHO Meeting on Criteria for HIV Screening Programmes, Geneva, 20-21 May 1987.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Special Programme on AIDS

    [Unpublished] 1987. 12 p. (WHO/SPA/GLO/87.2)

    The usefulness of proposed screening programs for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection must be weighed carefully against potential harmful effects. Because of complex social and ethical issues and the lack of any specific intervention against acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), screening programs may be intrusive and divert resources from educational programs. 21 participants from 17 countries attended a special meeting in May 1987 convened by the WHO Special Program on AIDS to discuss criteria for HIV screening programs. There was general consensus among participants that readily accessible counseling and testing for antibody to HIV, provided on a voluntary basis, are more likely to result in behavior changes that reduce the spread of AIDS than are mandatory screening initiatives. There was also agreement that mandatory screening of targeted populations is less likely than a voluntary approach to reach effectively those persons whose behavior can be influenced to reduce the risk of infection. To facilitate awareness of the complexities inherent in mandatory screening of at risk populations such as drug abusers and prostitutes, this report includes a list of criteria that must be considered and resolved in the planning process. These criteria are: what is the rationale of the proposed program, what population is to be screened, what test method is to be used, where is the laboratory testing to be done, what is the intended disposition of data obtained from testing, what plan will be used for communicating results to the person tested, how is counseling to be accomplished, what is the social impact of screening, and what legal and ethical considerations are raised by the proposed screening program?
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