Your search found 142 Results

  1. 1
    375818

    WHO recommendations on antenatal care for a positive pregnancy experience: Ultrasound examination. Highlights and key messages from the World Health Organization’s 2016 Global Recommendations.

    World Health Organization [WHO]; Maternal and Child Survival Program [MCSP]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2018 Jan. 4 p. (WHO/RHR/18.01; USAID Cooperative Agreement No. AID-OAA-A-14-00028)

    This brief highlights the WHO recommendation on routine antenatal ultrasound examination and the policy and program implications for translating this recommendation into action at the country level.
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  2. 2
    374728

    Basic newborn resuscitation: highlights from the World Health Organization 2012 guidelines.

    Maternal and Child Survival Program [MCSP]

    [Washington, D.C.], MCSP, 2017 Jun. 5 p. (USAID Cooperative Agreement No. AID-OAA-A-14-00028)

    This brief complements the 2012 WHO Guidelines on Basic Newborn Resuscitation, and highlights key changes and best practices for newborn resuscitation in resource-limited settings. Successful implementation of these recommendations at the time of birth is intended to improve the quality of care for newborns, and contribute to better health outcomes and reduce preventable newborn deaths and disabilities due to birth asphyxia.
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  3. 3
    337495

    Comprehensive cervical cancer control: A guide to essential practice. 2nd ed.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2014. [378] p.

    This publication, Comprehensive cervical cancer control: a guide to essential practice (C4GEP), gives a broad vision of what a comprehensive approach to cervical cancer prevention and control means. In particular, it outlines the complementary strategies for comprehensive cervical cancer prevention and control, and highlights the need for collaboration across programmes, organizations and partners. This new guide updates the 2006 edition and includes the recent promising developments in technologies and strategies that can address the gaps between the needs for and availability of services for cervical cancer prevention and control.
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  4. 4
    335019

    UN Commission on Life-Saving Commodities for Women and Children: Commissioners' report.

    United Nations. Commission on Life-Saving Commodities for Women and Children

    New York, New York, United Nations Commission on Life-Saving Commodities for Women and Children, 2012 Sep. [25] p.

    The United Nations Commission on Life-Saving Commodities for Women and Children presents a new plan and set of recommendations to improve the supply and access of life-saving health supplies.
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  5. 5
    334981

    WHO prequalification of male circumcision devices. Public report. Product: PrePex. Number: PQMC 0001-001-00. Version 1.0.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    [Geneva, Switzerland], WHO, 2013 May. [15] p. (PQMC 0001-001-00)

    PrePex with product codes DW0201, DW0202, DW0203, DW0204 and DW0205, manufactured by Circ MedTech Limited, CE-marked regulatory version, was accepted for the WHO list of prequalified male circumcision devices and was listed on 31 May 2013. PrePex is a single use, disposable device; indicated for circumcision of adult men, defined as circumferential excision of the foreskin or prepuce at or near the level of coronal sulcus, with minimal amount of preputial skin remaining. The device should not be used if the package has been compromised. Use by trained personnel only. All device components should not be reused at the risk of cross contamination. The device is intended for adults only and is not applicable for males under the age of 18. The device should be used only in settings where suitable surgical facilities and skills are available within a short time frame (6-12 hours) in order to manage potentially serious complications resulting from device displacements. Device displacement when wearing the device, may lead to the risk of adverse events. Informing the patient of safe behavior when wearing the device is critical. PrePex includes the following items: 1. Placement Ring 2. Elastic Ring 3. Inner Ring 4. Verification Thread Accessories: The PrePex Sizing Plate (PSP) is intended for single use for selecting an appropriate device size. The use of PrePex requires additional tools and materials which are not supplied with PrePex. For Placement: examination gloves, antiseptic solution, skin marker, gauze, 5% anesthetic cream and nurse utility scissors. For Removal: examination gloves, antiseptic solution, sterile harvey wire scissors, sterile forceps, sterile spatula, sterile scalpel, 2 wound dressings, nurse utility scissors and a cutter. Storage: The test kit should be stored at -10 to 55 °C. Shelf-life: 3 years.
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  6. 6
    334222

    Landscape for safe injection, phlebotomy, and waste management equipment. Standards, specifications, and products.

    Program for Appropriate Technology in Health [PATH]; John Snow [JSI]. Making Medical Injections Safer [MMIS]

    Boston, Massachusetts, JSI, MMIS, 2010 Jan. [82] p.

    This document provides guidelines for implementing a procurement policy for safe injection and brings together issues that countries should consider when developing and implementing the procurement aspect of a national injection safety policy. The document points out issues to consider in transitioning from policy to implementation, regulatory factors, public-sector considerations, and the need to sensitize private-sector manufacturers. It also includes a landscape of manufacturers of safe injection equipment.
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  7. 7
    332954

    Pandemic influenza A H1N1: Vaccination campaigns protect the most vulnerable populations in Togo. Photo and caption.

    John Snow [JSI]. DELIVER

    Arlington, Virginia, JSI, DELIVER, 2010 Dec. [2] p.

    During two countrywide vaccination campaigns, Togo's MOH immunized 10 percent of its most at-risk populations. Togo is one of 40 countries conducting a national H1N1 immunization campaign in collaboration with WHO and the USAID | DELIVER PROJECT.
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  8. 8
    345941
    Peer Reviewed

    Male circumcision: towards a World Health Organisation normative practice in resource limited settings.

    Hargreave T

    Asian Journal of Andrology. 2010; 12(5):628-638.

    There is now grade 1 evidence that male circumcision (MC) reduces the risk of a man acquiring HIV. Modelling studies indicate MC could in the next 10 years save up to 2 million lives in those African countries with high HIV prevalence. Several African countries are now scaling up public health MC programmes. The most effective immediate public health MC programmes in Africa will need to target 18-20 years old men. In the longer term there is a need for infant circumcision programmes. In order to implement more widespread MC there is a need to make the surgical procedures as simple as possible so that safe operations can be performed by paramedical staff. The WHO Manual of Male Circumcision under local anaesthetic was written with these objectives in mind. Included in the manual are three adult techniques and four paediatric procedures. The adult procedures are the dorsal slit, the forceps guided and the sleeve resection methods. Paediatric methods included are the plastibell technique, the Mogen and Gomco shield method and a standard surgical dorsal slit procedure. Each method is described in a step by step manner with photographic and line drawing illustrations. In addition to the WHO manual of surgical technique a teaching course has been developed and using this course it has been possible in one week to train a circumcision surgeon who has had no or minimal previous surgical experience. Further scaling will require training of circumcision surgeons, monitoring performance, training the trainer workshops as well as advocacy at national, international and government meetings. In addition to proceeding with standardised methods work is in progress to assess novel techniques in adults such as stay on ring devices and policies are being formulated as to how to assess new devices. Also work is in progress to explore efficiencies in surgical processing by task sharing. Proper informed consent and safety remain paramount and great care has to be taken as programmes in Africa scale up. In continental China where the HIV epidemic is at a much earlier stage there may be a case for considering infant circumcision but great care will be needed to ensure that there is no harm.
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  9. 9
    331968

    From advocacy to access: Bangladesh. 360 degrees advocacy: Strengthening a weak contraceptive supply chain in Bangladesh. Fact chart.

    Family Planning Association of Bangladesh; International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]

    London, England, IPPF, 2009 Nov. [2] p.

    In Bangladesh, the IPPF Member Association, the Family Planning Association of Bangladesh (FPAB), worked with the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare to improve the dysfunctional supply chain. Results to date include: The Ministry of Health reactivated the Logistical Coordination Forum, a donor, government and civil society led group, to identify and solve blockages in the supply chain; Capacity building and training for staff in the Logistics and Supply Unit were increased; The Ministry of Health and Family Welfare committed to using government resources to make up the shortfall from declining donor contributions.
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  10. 10
    331967

    From advocacy to access: Uganda. The power of networks: How do you mobilize funds for reproductive health supplies? Fact chart.

    Reproductive Health Uganda; International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]

    London, England, IPPF, 2009 Nov. [2] p.

    In Uganda the IPPF Member Association, Reproductive Health Uganda (RHU) coordinated civil society and mobilized advocates and champions to increase the availability of RH supplies and family planning. Results to date include: The Government of Uganda increased funding for RH supplies in the 2010 budget; The Government of Uganda disburses funds directly to the National Medical Stores on an annual basis enabling the bulk purchase of contraceptives; 30 out of 80 districts have committed to increasing their resource allocation for family planning and RH supplies.
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  11. 11
    342498

    Saving women's lives in refugee and other crisis situations. Manual vacuum aspiration.

    Ipas

    Chapel Hill, North Carolina, Ipas, 2008. 4 p.

    The United Nations Population Fund estimates that 25-50 percent of maternal deaths in refugee settings are attributable to unsafe abortions. Making pregnancy safer includes timely and appropriate management of unsafe and spontaneous abortion for all women, and the provision of or referral for safe abortion services to the full extent allowed by law. Manual vacuum aspiration (MVA) has been used worldwide for more than three decades, enabling millions of women in developed and developing countries to undergo safe and effective uterine evacuation for treatment of incomplete abortion and first-trimester abortion, as well as endometrial biopsy. This brochure highlights how MVA is an important part of safe, effective abortion and postabortion care in conflict settings.
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  12. 12
    328537

    Procuring Single-Use Injection Equipment and Safety Boxes: A Practical Guide for Pharmacists, Physicians, Procurement Staff and Programme Managers

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Health Technology and Pharmaceuticals, Department of Blood Safety and Clinical Technology

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2003 May 5. (WHO/BCT/03.04)

    The objective of this guide is to accompany pharmacists, physicians, procurement staff and programme managers through the process of procuring single-use injection equipment and safety boxes of assured quality, on a national or international market, at reasonable prices. International organizations have established standardized procurement procedures for medicines and medical devices. This guide describes how these procedures can be used to ensure the procurement of injection equipment and safety boxes. Institutions procuring injection equipment need to develop a list of manufacturers that are prequalified on the basis of certain criteria which include international quality standards. This guide provides steps and tools for procurement, including a pre-qualification procedure of injection equipment for purchase. Developing a monitoring system for supplier performance will improve and safeguard the quality of injection equipment selected and prevent or eliminate unreliable suppliers.
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  13. 13
    323434
    Peer Reviewed

    Reducing the impact of climate change.

    Brown H

    Bulletin of the World Health Organization. 2007 Nov; 85(11):824-825.

    The most recent report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) found that there is overwhelming evidence that humans are affecting climate and it highlighted the implications for human health. The World Health Organization (WHO) is helping countries respond to this challenge, primarily by encouraging them to build and reinforce public health systems as the first line of defence against climate-related health risks. (excerpt)
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  14. 14
    322021

    Handbook of supply management at first-level health care facilities. 1st version for country adaptation.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2006. 73 p. (WHO/HIV/2006.03)

    All first-level health care facilities, namely primary health care clinics and outpatient departments based in district hospitals, use medicines and related supplies. It takes a team effort to manage these supplies, involving all health care facility staff: doctors, nurses, health workers and storekeepers. This is especially true in small facilities with only one or two health workers. Each staff member should know how to manage all supplies at the health care facility correctly. Each staff member has an important role. The Handbook of Supply Management at First-Level Health Care Facilities describes all major medicines and supply management tasks, known as the standard procedures of medicines supply management at first-level health care facilities. Each chapter covers one major task, explains how the task fits into the process of maintaining a consistent supply of medicines, and recommends which standard procedures to use. Annexes at the back of the handbook contain various checklists and examples of forms which can be introduced as needed at your health care facility. This handbook is part of a package used in an integrated training and capacity-building course targeted at first-level health care facilities. It can be used in conjunction with the existing Integrated Management of Adult and Adolescent Illness (IMAI) strategy developed by WHO. It can also be used for basic training activities independent of IMAI training courses. (excerpt)
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  15. 15
    320903

    Developing and testing a generic job aid for malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs). Field report.

    Rennie W; Harvey SA

    Bethesda, Maryland, University Research Company, Quality Assurance Project, 2004 Dec. 47 p. (QAP / WHO Field Report)

    The traditional approach to malaria diagnosis has been examination by microscope of a thick blood smear from the individual suspected of being infected. In an attempt to provide a more rapid alternative, companies worldwide have developed malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs). Although RDTs can be effectively used in clinical settings by trained personnel, their greatest potential use is in rural areas with limited access to health and laboratory facilities. Using RDTs for diagnosis at the community level will shorten the delay between the onset of symptoms and the beginning of appropriate treatment. It will also slow development of resistance and lead to significant cost savings by avoiding unnecessary use of antimalarials. However, achieving a high level of sensitivity and specificity with RDTs in this context will require a product designed, labelled, and explained so that community health workers (CHWs) can use it accurately with minimal formal training and supervision. In partnership with theWHO Regional Office for the Western Pacific, the Quality Assurance Project (QAP) carried out quality-design research in the Philippines and the Lao People's Democratic Republic to develop and test a generic RDT job aid, mainly pictorial, that could be adapted with little modification for use with different RDT products and in different cultural settings by health workers with low literacy skills and with little or no prior training in product use. (author's)
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  16. 16
    319303

    Better procurement and supply management of HIV / AIDs drugs and supplies.

    Osewe PL; Habiyambere V; Li Bassi L

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, Global HIV / AIDS Program, 2005 Dec. 5 p.

    Many countries are working to expand access to antiretroviral (ARV) drugs for millions of people with HIV/AIDS. Uninterrupted and timely supplies of safe, effective and affordable ARV drugs are needed. They must be dispensed correctly by health workers, and consistently taken by patients. A partnership between the World Bank and World Health Organization (WHO), in collaboration with the Global Fund for AIDS, TB and Malaria (GFATM), UNICEF, UNAIDS, and the American and French Governments is helping countries build capacity to procure and manage HIV/AIDS drugs and related supplies. This effort has helped support an increase in the number of people on ARV treatment in low- and middle income countries, from 400,000 at the end of 2003, to about one million in June 2005. (author's)
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  17. 17
    316239
    Peer Reviewed

    Roles of laboratories and laboratory systems in effective tuberculosis programmes.

    Ridderhof JC; van Deun A; Kam KM; Narayanan PR

    Bulletin of the World Health Organization. 2007 May; 85(5):325-420.

    Laboratories and laboratory networks are a fundamental component of tuberculosis (TB) control, providing testing for diagnosis, surveillance and treatment monitoring at every level of the health-care system. New initiatives and resources to strengthen laboratory capacity and implement rapid and new diagnostic tests for TB will require recognition that laboratories are systems that require quality standards, appropriate human resources, and attention to safety in addition to supplies and equipment. To prepare the laboratory networks for new diagnostics and expanded capacity, we need to focus efforts on strengthening quality management systems (QMS) through additional resources for external quality assessment programmes for microscopy, culture, drug susceptibility testing (DST) and molecular diagnostics. QMS should also promote development of accreditation programmes to ensure adherence to standards to improve both the quality and credibility of the laboratory system within TB programmes. Corresponding attention must be given to addressing human resources at every level of the laboratory, with special consideration being given to new programmes for laboratory management and leadership skills. Strengthening laboratory networks will also involve setting up partnerships between TB programmes and those seeking to control other diseases in order to pool resources and to promote advocacy for quality standards, to develop strategies to integrate laboratories' functions and to extend control programme activities to the private sector. Improving the laboratory system will assure that increased resources, in the form of supplies, equipment and facilities, will be invested in networks that are capable of providing effective testing to meet the goals of the Global Plan to Stop TB. (author's)
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  18. 18
    314779

    IUD logistics fact sheet.

    John Snow [JSI]. DELIVER

    [Arlington, Virginia], JSI, DELIVER, 2006 Feb. [2] p. (USAID Contract No. HRN-C-00-00-00010-00; USAID Development Experience Clearinghouse DocID / Order No. PN-ADI-092)

    For individually packaged devices, the expiration date on package refers to sterility of product, assuming packaging is not damaged. IUDs should be protected from heat and direct sunlight. Any break or perforation of sterile package makes the product nonsterile. Copper IUDs sometimes tarnish; copper tarnish does not affect IUD efficacy or safety and does not indicate that the package seal has been broken. Shelf life should not be confused with use life; for example, FEI Products Inc. Copper T 380As inserted at any time during their shelf life (7 years from date of manufacture) have a use life that is at least 12 years from the date of insertion. Because different brands may have different insertion instructions, it is essential that all devices be clearly labeled. (excerpt)
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  19. 19
    314608

    Achieving the ICPD goals: reproductive health commodity requirements, 2000-2015.

    Bulatao R

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], 2005. [80] p.

    Contraceptives, drugs, and medical supplies required for reproductive health services in developing regions cost US$1.84 billion in 2000, will cost $2.34 billion in 2005, and will rise in cost to $3.43 billion by 2015. Annual costs will be 86 per cent higher, in constant dollars, in 2015 than in 2000 (Figure 1). These estimates cover contraceptives for family planning, condoms for protection against HIV and other sexually transmitted infections, and drugs and medical supplies for safe deliveries and other reproductive health services. Drugs and medical supplies make up over half the total cost, contraceptives around one-third, and condoms for protection the remaining one-eighth or so. The estimates are detailed in this report, which attempts to assess the overall costs of reproductive health commodities, which UNFPA has traditionally had a major role in helping provide for developing regions. These commodities are essential to achieve the goal of providing universal access to reproductive health care, as mandated in 1994 by the International Conference on Population and Development. The report is not intended to specify the quantities and cost of commodities needed in particular countries but rather tries to arrive at estimates of global requirements. Nevertheless, the calculations are based on detailed consideration of regional and even country data where they are available. The report assesses the number of cases in developing regions of each relevant reproductive health condition, projects these numbers over 15 years, determines the commodities required as part of appropriate treatment, estimates the proportion of cases that do receive such treatment, specifies how coverage should rise in the future, and calculates the commodity costs for all the cases to be covered. (excerpt)
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  20. 20
    312576

    WHO training course for TB consultants: RPM Plus drug management sessions in Sondalo, Italy, September 28 - October 1, 2006: trip report.

    Barillas E

    Arlington, Virginia, Management Sciences for Health, Center for Pharmaceutical Management, Rational Pharmaceutical Management Plus, 2006 Oct 18. 26 p. (USAID Cooperative Agreement No. HRN-A-00-00-00016-00; USAID Development Experience Clearinghouse DocID / Order No. PN-ACI-323)

    WHO, Stop-TB Partners, and NGOs that support country programs for DOTS implementation and expansion require capable consultants in assessing the capacity of countries to manage TB pharmaceuticals in their programs, developing interventions, and providing direct technical assistance to improve availability and accessibility of quality TB medicines. Beginning in 2001, RPM Plus, in addition to its own formal courses on pharmaceutical management for tuberculosis, has contributed modules and facilitated sessions on specific aspects of pharmaceutical management to the WHO Courses for TB Consultants in Sondalo. The WHO TB Course for TB Consultants was developed and initiated in 2001 by the WHO Collaborating Centre for Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases, the S. Maugeri Foundation, the Morelli Hospital, and TB CTA. The main goal of the course is to increase the pool of international level TB consultants. As of December 2005, over 150 international TB consultants have participated in the training, a majority ofwhom have already been employed in consultancy activities by the WHO and international donors. In 2006 fiscal year RPM Plus received funds from USAID to continue supporting the Sondalo Course, which allowed RPM Plus to facilitate sessions on pharmaceutical management for TB at four courses in May, June, July, and October of 2006. RPM Plus Senior Program Associate, Edgar Barillas, traveled to Sondalo from September 28 to October 1 to facilitate the TB pharmaceutical management session at the WHO course for TB Consultants in Sondalo, Italy. (excerpt)
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  21. 21
    312470

    Procurement manual for the DOTS-Plus projects approved by the Green Light Committee.

    Jille I; Jouberton F; Jaramillo E; Sereguina M; Wehrens R

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2006 Apr. 20 p. (WHO/HTM/TB/2003.328 Rev.2)

    The IDA Foundation is a non-profit organization supporting health care in low- and middle-income countries by providing high-quality drugs and medical supplies at the lowest possible price. In addition, IDA provides procurement agency services and offers consultancy and training on topics related to the various aspects of pharmaceutical supply management. IDA is based in the Netherlands and is ISO 9002-2000 and GDP certified. The quality of IDA products is verified in IDA's GcLP-approved laboratories. GLC is a subgroup of the Stop TB Working Group on DOTS-Plus for MDR-TB. GLC has been established to review applications from potential DOTS-Plus pilot projects and determine whether they are in compliance with WHO's Guidelines for establishing DOTSPlus pilot projects for the management of MDR-TB. Projects that are approved will benefit from second-line anti-TB drugs at concessional prices and from technical assistance from the GLC. (excerpt)
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  22. 22
    312468

    Evaluation of WHO's contribution to "3 by 5": main report.

    Battistella Nemes MI; Beaudoin J; Conway S; Kivumbi GW; Skjelmerud A

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2006 Mar 30. [133] p.

    This independent formative evaluation was conducted by a team of six international consultants between August 2005 and January 2006 to appraise WHO's contributions and roles in implementing the "3 by 5" Initiative. Funded by the Canadian Government, and as a requirement for its grant to WHO, the evaluation investigated all three levels at which WHO operates (headquarters, regional offices and country offices), placing particular emphasis on Africa. This included seven country assessments and an extensive consultation of international and country-level partners and stakeholders. A number of focused technical studies were also commissioned. The evaluation reviewed how effectively WHO provided technical, managerial and administrative guidance and support pursuant to the "3 by 5" goals and target. An assessment was also made of the extent to which WHO has mobilized, sustained and contributed to this major global partnership through improving harmonization between United Nations agencies and working with other stakeholders and partners. Key lessons from "3 by 5" have been documented, including those on how the initiative contributed to health systems strengthening and HIV prevention, as well as the ways with which equity and gender concerns were dealt. Potential opportunities for future collaboration between WHO, main donors and partners were identified and recommendations have been provided for future plans and the way forward for WHO and its partners. (excerpt)
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  23. 23
    311835
    Peer Reviewed

    Measurement and standardization protocols for anthropometry used in the construction of a new international growth reference.

    de Onis M; Onyango AW; Van den Broeck J; Chumlea WC; Martorell R

    Food and Nutrition Bulletin. 2004; 25 Suppl 1:S27-S36.

    Thorough training, continuous standardization, and close monitoring of the adherence to measurement procedures during data collection are essential for minimizing random error and bias in multicenter studies. Rigorous anthropometry and data collection protocols were used in the WHO Multicentre Growth Reference Study to ensure high data quality. After the initial training and standardization, study teams participated in standardization sessions every two months for a continuous assessment of the precision and accuracy of their measurements. Once a year the teams were restandardized against the WHO lead anthropometrist, who observed their measurement techniques and retrained any deviating observers. Robust and precise equipment was selected and adapted for field use. The anthropometrists worked in pairs, taking measurements independently, and repeating measurements that exceeded preset maximum allowable differences. Ongoing central and local monitoring identified anthropometrists deviating from standard procedures, and immediate corrective action was taken. The procedures described in this paper are a model for research settings. (author's)
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  24. 24
    311836
    Peer Reviewed

    Assessment of gross motor development in the WHO Multicentre Growth Reference Study.

    Wijnhoven TM; de Onis M; Onyango AW; Wang T; Bjoerneboe GE

    Food and Nutrition Bulletin. 2004; 25 Suppl 1:S37-S45.

    The objective of the Motor Development Study was to describe the acquisition of selected gross motor milestones among affluent children growing up in different cultural settings. This study was conducted in Ghana, India, Norway, Oman, and the United States as part of the longitudinal component of the World Health Organization (WHO) Multicentre Growth Reference Study (MGRS). Infants were followed from the age of four months until they could walk independently. Six milestones that are fundamental to acquiring self-sufficient erect locomotion and are simple to evaluate were assessed: sitting without support, hands-and-knees crawling, standing with assistance, walking with assistance, standing alone, and walking alone. The information was collected by both the children's caregivers and trained MGRS fieldworkers. The caregivers assessed and recorded the dates when the milestones were achieved for the first time according to established criteria. Using standardized procedures, the fieldworkers independently assessed the motor performance of the children and checked parental recording at home visits. To ensure standardized data collection, the sites conducted regular standardization sessions. Data collection and data quality control took place simultaneously. Data verification and cleaning were performed until all queries had been satisfactorily resolved. (author's)
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  25. 25
    307304

    Rational Pharmaceutical Management Plus. Report of UNICEF-WHO consultation: Development of a Programming Guide for Scaling Up Treatment, Care and Support for HIV-Infected and Exposed Children in Resource-Constrained Settings, New York City, USA: January 11-13, 2006.

    Walkowiak H

    Arlington, Virginia, Management Sciences for Health, Rational Pharmaceutical Management Plus, 2006 Jan 24. 22 p. (USAID Development Experience Clearinghouse DocID / Order No: PN-ADG-534; USAID Cooperative Agreement No. HRN-A-00-00-00016-00)

    While many countries in resource-limited settings have made considerable progress in scaling up access to HIV care and treatment for adults, the provision of services, especially antiretroviral therapy (ART) for children, is still in the early stages. The United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) and the World Health Organization (WHO) have agreed to develop appropriate programming guidance to assist countries in the scale up of pediatric HIV care and support. The consultation was convened jointly by UNICEF and WHO with the following goal and objectives. Goal-- The aim of this meeting is to review the draft UNICEF / WHO programming guidance and identify essential revisions and modifications and outline next steps. Specific Objectives -- 1. Review and agree on the essential package of services for treatment, care and support of HIV-exposed and HIV-infected infants and children. This will include, but not be limited to: a. Routine HIV testing; b. Follow up of children exposed to HIV and ensuring early testing (polymerase chain reaction [PCR] for infants and for older children, rapid antibody) through child and family care programs; c. Delivery of long-term care of symptomatic children in health care settings, including provision of cotrimoxazole prophylaxis and ART; d. Training to improve skill levels of health care providers and laboratory staff; e. Delivery of home-based care to both exposed and infected children; f. Provision of psychosocial support and counseling for HIV-infected children; g. Quality improvement activities. 2. Review the draft programming guidance to confirm its applicability, suitability, and relevance to the key intended audience. 3. To examine and endorse the identified key program elements of the draft programming guidance. (excerpt)
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