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Your search found 16 Results

  1. 1
    360516
    Peer Reviewed

    Scale-up of TB and HIV programme collaborative activities in Zambia - a 10-year review.

    Kapata N; Chanda-Kapata P; Grobusch MP; O'Grady J; Schwank S; Bates M; Jansenn S; Mwinga A; Cobelens F; Mwaba P; Zumla A

    Tropical Medicine and International Health. 2012 Jun; 17(6):760-6.

    OBJECTIVE: To review the activities, progress, achievements and challenges of the Zambia Ministry of Health tuberculosis (TB)/HIV collaborative activities over the past decade. METHODS: Analysis of Zambia Ministry of Health National TB and HIV programme documents and external independent programme review reports pertaining to 2000-2010. RESULTS: The number of people testing for HIV increased from 37 557 persons in 2003 to 1 327 995 persons in 2010 nationally. Those receiving anti-retroviral therapy (ART) increased from 143 in 2003 to 344 304 in 2010. The national HIV prevalence estimates declined from 14.3% in 2001 to 13.5% in 2009. The proportion of TB patients being tested for HIV increased from 22.6% in 2006 to 84% in 2010 and approximately 70% were HIV positive. The proportion of the HIV-infected TB patients who: (i) started on ART increased from 38% in 2006 to 50% in 2010; (ii) commenced co-trimoxazole preventive therapy (CPT) increased from 31% in 2006 to 70% in 2010; and (iii) were successfully treated increased to an average of 80% resulting in decline of deaths from 13% in 2006 to 9% in 2010. CONCLUSIONS: The scale-up of TB/HIV collaborative programme activities in Zambia has steadily increased over the past decade resulting in increased testing for TB and HIV, and anti-retroviral (ARV) rollout with improved treatment outcomes among TB patients co-infected with HIV. Getting service delivery points to adhere to WHO guidelines for collaborative TB/HIV activities remains problematic, especially those meant to reduce the burden of TB in people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). (c) 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
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  2. 2
    351595
    Peer Reviewed

    [Clinical, epidemiological and microbiological characteristics of a cohort of pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Cali, Colombia] Caracteristicas clinicas, epidemiologicas y microbiologicas de una cohorte de pacientes con tuberculosis pulmonar en Cali, Colombia.

    Rojas CM; Villegas SL; Pineros HM; Chamorro EM; Duran CE; Hernandez EL; Pacheco R; Ferro BE

    Biomedica. 2010 Oct-Dec; 30(4):482-91.

    INTRODUCTION: The World Health Organization recommended strategy for global tuberculosis control is a short-course, clinically administered treatment, This approach has approximately 70% coverage in Colombia. OBJECTIVE: The clinical, epidemiological and microbiological characteristics along with drug therapy outcomes were described in newly diagnosed, pulmonary tuberculosis patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was a descriptive study, conducted as part of a multicenter clinical trial of tuberculosis treatment. A cohort of 106 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis were recruited from several public health facilities in Cali between April 2005 and June 2006. Sputum smear microscopy, culture, drug susceptibility tests to first-line anti-tuberculosis drugs, chest X- ray and HIV-ELISA were performed. Clinical and epidemiological information was collected for each participant. Treatment was administered by the local tuberculosis health facility. Food and transportation incentives were provided during a 30 month follow-up period. RESULTS: The majority of patients were young males with a diagnostic delay longer than 9 weeks and a high sputum smear grade (2+ or 3+). The initial drug resistance was 7.5% for single drug treatment and 1.9% for multidrug treatments. The incidence of adverse events associated with treatment was 8.5%. HIV co-infection was present in 5.7% of the cases. Eighty-six percent of the patients completed the treatment and were considered cured. The radiographic presentation varied within a broad range and differed from the classic progression to cavity formation. CONCLUSION: Delay in tuberculosis diagnosis was identified as a risk factor for treatment compliance failure. The study population had similar baseline epidemiologic characteristics to those described in other cohort studies.
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  3. 3
    346911
    Peer Reviewed

    Monitoring linked epidemics: the case of tuberculosis and HIV.

    Sanchez MS; Lloyd-Smith JO; Getz WM

    PloS One. 2010; 5(1):e8796.

    BACKGROUND: The tight epidemiological coupling between HIV and its associated opportunistic infections leads to challenges and opportunities for disease surveillance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We review efforts of WHO and collaborating agencies to track and fight the TB/HIV co-epidemic, and discuss modeling--via mathematical, statistical, and computational approaches--as a means to identify disease indicators designed to integrate data from linked diseases in order to characterize how co-epidemics change in time and space. We present R(TB/HIV), an index comparing changes in TB incidence relative to HIV prevalence, and use it to identify those sub-Saharan African countries with outlier TB/HIV dynamics. R(TB/HIV) can also be used to predict epidemiological trends, investigate the coherency of reported trends, and cross-check the anticipated impact of public health interventions. Identifying the cause(s) responsible for anomalous R(TB/HIV) values can reveal information crucial to the management of public health. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We frame our suggestions for integrating and analyzing co-epidemic data within the context of global disease monitoring. Used routinely, joint disease indicators such as R(TB/HIV) could greatly enhance the monitoring and evaluation of public health programs.
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  4. 4
    332280

    Multidrug and extensively drug-resistant TB (M/XDR-TB): 2010 global report on surveillance and response.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Stop TB Department

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2010. [71] p.

    This new report on anti-tuberculosis (TB) drug resistance by the World Health Organization (WHO) updates "Anti-tuberculosis drug resistance in the world: Report No. 4" published by WHO in 2008. It summarizes the latest data and provides latest estimates of the global epidemic of multidrug and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (M/XDR-TB). For the first time, this report includes an assessment of the progress countries are making to diagnose and treat MDR-TB cases. (Excerpt)
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  5. 5
    319047
    Peer Reviewed

    Evaluating the potential impact of the new Global Plan to Stop TB: Thailand, 2004 -- 2005.

    Varma JK; Wiriyakitjar D; Nateniyom S; Anuwatnonthakate A; Monkongdee P

    Bulletin of the World Health Organization. 2007 Aug; 85(8):586-592.

    WHO's new Global Plan to Stop TB 2006-2015 advises countries with a high burden of tuberculosis (TB) to expand case-finding in the private sector as well as services for patients with HIV and multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB). The objective of this study was to evaluate these strategies in Thailand using data from the Thailand TB Active Surveillance Network, a demonstration project begun in 2004. In October 2004, we began contacting public and private health-care facilities monthly to record data about people diagnosed with TB, assist with patient care, provide HIV counselling and testing, and obtain sputum samples for culture and susceptibility testing. The catchment area included 3.6 million people in four provinces. We compared results from October 2004-September 2005 (referred to as 2005) to baseline data from October 2002-September 2003 (referred to as 2003). In 2005, we ascertained 5841 TB cases (164/100 000), including 2320 new smear-positive cases (65/100 000). Compared with routine passive surveillance in 2003, active surveillance increased reporting of all TB cases by 19% and of new smear-positive cases by 13%. Private facilities diagnosed 634 (11%) of all TB cases. In 2005, 1392 (24%) cases were known to be HIV positive. The proportion of cases with an unknown HIV status decreased from 66% (3226/4904) in 2003 to 23% (1329/5841) in 2005 (P< 0.01). Of 4656 pulmonary cases, mycobacterial culture was performed in 3024 (65%) and MDR-TB diagnosed in 60 (1%). In Thailand, piloting the new WHO strategy increased case-finding and collaboration with the private sector, and improved HIV services for TB patients and the diagnosis of MDR-TB. Further analysis of treatment outcomes and costs is needed to assess this programme's impact and cost effectiveness. (author's)
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  6. 6
    318625
    Peer Reviewed

    Tuberculosis and HIV infection: The global setting.

    Nunn P; Reid A; De Cock KM

    Journal of Infectious Diseases. 2007 Aug 15; 196 Suppl 1:S5-S14.

    Tuberculosis (TB) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection make each other's control significantly more difficult. Coordination in addressing this "cursed duet" is insufficient at both global and national levels. However, global policy for TB/HIV coordination has been set, and there is consensus around this policy from both the TB and HIV control communities. The policy aims to provide all necessary care for the prevention and management of HIV-associated TB, but its implementation is hindered by real technical difficulties and shortages of resources. All major global-level institutions involved in HIV care and prevention must include TB control as part of their corporate policy. Country-level decision makers need to work together to expand both TB and HIV services, and civil society and community representatives need to hold those responsible accountable for their delivery. The TB and HIV communities should join forces to address the health-sector weaknesses that confront them both. (author's)
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  7. 7
    308408
    Peer Reviewed

    XDR tuberculosis spreads across South Africa.

    Kapp C

    Lancet. 2007 Mar 3; 369(9563):715-798.

    South Africa is struggling to contain an outbreak of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis, which has now spread to all the country's provinces, according to the Department of Health, and threatens to hamper HIV/AIDS treatment plans. Clare Kapp reports from South Africa. WHO is sending a permanent staff member to be based in South Africa to advise authorities struggling with an outbreak of extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis. The Department of Health says there have now been 269 confirmed cases of XDR tuberculosis and that it has spread from the province of KwaZulu-Natal, where it was first confirmed, to all parts of South Africa. But Karin Weyer, tuberculosis research director at the Medical Research Council (MRC), said nobody really knows the true number of cases because of laboratory and diagnostics constraints and inconsistencies in reporting. So far there have been no reported cases in neighbouring southern African countries, but Weyner believes that this is because they simply do not have the laboratory testing facilities. (excerpt)
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  8. 8
    310966
    Peer Reviewed

    Epidemiology of antituberculosis drug resistance (the Global Project on Anti-tuberculosis Drug Resistance Surveillance): an updated analysis.

    Aziz MA; Wright A; Laszlo A; De Muynck A; Portaels F

    Lancet. 2006 Dec 16; 368(9553):2142-2154.

    The burden of tuberculosis is compounded by drug-resistant forms of the disease. This study aimed to analyse data on antituberculosis drug resistance gathered by the WHO and International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease Global Project on Anti-tuberculosis Drug Resistance Surveillance. Data on drug susceptibility testing for four antituberculosis drugs--isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol, and streptomycin--were gathered in the third round of the Global Project (1999-2002) from surveys or ongoing surveillance in 79 countries or geographical settings. These data were combined with those from the first two rounds of the project and analyses were done. Countries that participated followed a standardised set of guidelines to ensure comparability both between and within countries. The median prevalence of resistance to any of the four antituberculosis drugs in new cases of tuberculosis identified in 76 countries or geographical settings was 10.2% (range 0.0-57.1). The median prevalence of multidrug resistance in new cases was 1.0% (range 0.0-14.2). Kazakhstan, Tomsk Oblast (Russia), Karakalpakstan (Uzbekistan), Estonia, Israel, the Chinese provinces Liaoning and Henan, Lithuania, and Latvia reported prevalence of multidrug resistance above 6.5%. Trend analysis showed a significant increase in the prevalence of multidrug resistance in new cases in Tomsk Oblast (p < 0.0001). Hong Kong (p = 0.01) and the USA (p = 0.0002) reported significant decreasing trends in multidrug resistance in new cases of tuberculosis. Multidrug resistance represents a serious challenge for tuberculosis control in countries of the former Soviet Union and in some provinces of China. Gaps in coverage of the Global Project are substantial, and baseline information is urgently required from several countries with high tuberculosis burden to develop appropriate control interventions. (author's)
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  9. 9
    283569

    Inconsistencies between tuberculosis reporting by the Ministry of Health and the World Health Organization. Mexico, 1981-1998. Discrepancias entre los datos ofrecidos por la Secretaría de Salud y la Organización Mundial de la Salud sobre tuberculosis en México, 1981-1998.

    Báez-Saldaña AR; Pérez-Padilla JR; Salazar-Lezama MA

    Salud Pública de México. 2003 Mar-Apr; 45(2):78-83.

    The objective was to describe the tuberculosis morbidity and mortality trends in Mexico, by comparing the data reported by the Ministry of Health (MH) and the World Health Organization (WHO) between 1981 and 1998. The number of cases notified in the past few years, their rates, and the trends of the disease in Mexico were analyzed. The incidence of smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis was estimated for 1997 and 1998 with the annual tuberculosis infection risk (ATIR), to estimate the percentage of bacilliferous cases in 1997-1998. WHO reported more tuberculosis cases for Mexico than the MH. However, this difference has decreased throughout the years. The notification of smear-positive cases remained stable during 1993-1998. The estimated percentages of detection were 66% for 1997 and 26% for 1998 (based on ATIR of 0.5%). Tuberculosis mortality decreased gradually (6.7% per year) between 1990 and 1998, whereas the number of new cases increased, suggesting the persistence of disease transmission in the population. Inconsistencies between case notifications from national data and WHO were considerable, but decreased progressively during the study period. According to ATIR estimations, a considerable number of infectious tuberculosis cases are not detected. (author's)
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  10. 10
    282827

    Regional strategic plan to stop TB in the Western Pacific.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Regional Office for the Western Pacific. Taskforce for Stop TB

    Manila, Philippines, WHO, Regional Office for the Western Pacific, 2000. [42] p.

    Mission statement: to significantly reduce morbidity and mortality due to tuberculosis by promoting accessibility and sustainability of the DOTS strategy as part of health system development. The objectives of the Stop TB special project in the Western Pacific are to: reduce the prevalence and mortality of tuberculosis in the Region by half within ten years (by 2010); and ensure that the DOTS strategy is incorporated into country plans for health sector development. (excerpt)
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  11. 11
    282171

    Guidelines for the control of tuberculosis through DOTS strategy in Pacific Island countries.

    Blanc L; Ahn DI; Diletto C

    Manila, Philippines, World Health Organization [WHO], Regional Office for the Western Pacific, 1999. [43] p.

    Each of the small Pacific island countries has its own characteristics that need specific approaches in the implementation of DOTS strategy. The available tuberculosis guidelines are often too complex and too difficult to adapt. So health managers and health workers of these small countries need to have operational guidelines that are practical and simple to assist them in implementing an effective tuberculosis control programme based on the WHO recommended DOTS strategy. The main objectives of the guidelines are as follows: to guide tuberculosis programme managers in the implementation of DOTS strategy and the control of tuberculosis; to guide health workers and community leaders in identifying and referring suspect cases; and to guide health workers, patients and their families towards achieving a cure. As the guidelines are tested in a variety of different situations in the field, comments would be welcome and will help to improve future editions. Comments can be sent to WHO Regional Office for the Western Pacific, Tuberculosis Programme, Chronic Communicable Disease Unit. (excerpt)
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  12. 12
    282165

    Fighting TB -- forging ahead. Overview of the Stop TB Special Project in the Western Pacific Region, 2002.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Regional Office for the Western Pacific. Stop TB Special Project

    Manila, Philippines, WHO, Regional Office for the Western Pacific, 2002. 77 p.

    This report: (i) describes the epidemiological situation of TB control in the Western Pacific Region, (ii) outlines the progress in building and implementing the Stop TB Special Project, (iii) discusses the issues and challenges in reducing TB prevalence in the seven most highrisk countries in the Region, and (iv) appraises the special project’s financial resources and requirements up to 2005. Adequate funds are essential to the success of the Stop TB Special Project and to reaching the targets in TB control. This report thus gives special attention to the seven TB high burden countries’ national Stop TB plans, including their partnership-building and resource mobilization. A summary of their five-year plans, which were endorsed by the second Technical Advisory Group (TAG) meeting of Beijing in June 2001, can be found in Annex 1. (excerpt)
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  13. 13
    282159

    Guidelines for implementing collaborative TB and HIV programme activities.

    Hargreaves N; Scano F

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], Stop TB Department, 2003. [84] p. (WHO/CDS/TB/2003.319; WHO/HIV/2003.01)

    The main aim of the guidelines is to enable the central units of national TB and HIV/AIDS programmes to support districts to plan, coordinate and implement collaborative TB/HIV activities. The guidelines are intended for countries with either an overlapping TB and HIV epidemic or where there is an increasing HIV rate which may fuel the TB epidemic. The WHO “Strategic Framework to Reduce the Burden of TB/HIV" provides the evidence base for these guidelines. The guidelines are designed to implement the interventions as described in this framework. The guidelines reflect lessons learned from TB/HIV field sites including ProTEST with experience from comprehensive TB/HIV health services and interventions. The guidelines are structured in line with the main theme of putting these interventions into action: what to implement, how to implement it and by whom. The health situation is urgent and requires a move away from small scale, often costly and time-limited pilot projects to phased implementation of collaborative TB/HIV activities. Phased implementation will build on experience learned form ProTEST pilot sites. Human and financial constraints make phased implementation necessary. (excerpt)
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  14. 14
    278906

    Anti-tuberculosis drug resistance in the world. Third global report. The WHO / IUATLD Global Project on Anti-Tuberculosis Drug Resistance Surveillance, 1999-2002.

    Abdel Aziz M; Wright A; De Muynck A; Laszlo A

    [Geneva, Switzerland], World Health Organization [WHO], WHO / IUATLD Global Project on Anti-Tuberculosis Drug Resistance Surveillance, [2003]. 129 p.

    This is the third report of the WHO/IUATLD Global Project on Anti-Tuberculosis Drug Resistance Surveillance. The two previous reports were published in 1997 and 2001 and included data from 35 and 58 settings respectively. The main conclusions of the two previous reports were that drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) was present in all settings surveyed, multi-drug resistance (MDR) was identified in most settings, and that good TB control practices were associated with lower or decreasing levels of resistance. The goal of the third report is to expand knowledge of the prevalent patterns of resistance globally and explore trends in resistance over time. This report includes new data from 77 settings or countries collected in the third phase of the project, between 1999 and 2002, representing 20% of the global total of new smear-positive TB cases. It includes 39 settings not previously included in the Global Project and reports trends for 46 settings. Data were included if they adhered to the following principles: (1) the sample was representative of all TB cases in the setting under evaluation; (2) new patients were clearly distinguished from those with previous treatment; and (3) optimal laboratory performance was assured and maintained through links with a supranational reference laboratory (SRL). Data were obtained through routine or continuous surveillance of all TB cases (38 settings) or from specific surveys of sampled patients, as outlined in approved protocols (39 settings). Data were reported on a standard reporting form, either annually or at the completion of the survey. (excerpt)
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  15. 15
    187998
    Peer Reviewed

    Tuberculosis drug resistance: a global threat.

    Nachega JB; Chaisson RE

    Clinical Infectious Diseases. 2003 Jan 15; 36 Suppl 1:S24-S30.

    Resistance to antituberculosis drugs has been a problem since the era of chemotherapy began. After dramatic outbreaks of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in the early 1990s, resistance became recognized as a global problem. MDR-TB now threatens the inhabitants of countries in Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas. An understanding of the molecular basis of drug resistance may contribute to the development of new drugs. Management of MDR-TB relies on prompt recognition and treatment with at least 3 drugs to which an isolate is susceptible. (author's)
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  16. 16
    102459

    Surveillance of resistance to antituberculosis drugs in developing countries.

    Nunn P; Felten M

    TUBERCLE AND LUNG DISEASE. 1994 Jun; 75(3):163-7.

    Poor management of tuberculosis (TB) control is responsible for resistance to antituberculosis drugs. It leads to treatment failure, relapse, transmission of resistant TB, and multi-drug resistant TB. In developing countries, where resources are already limited, an epidemic of multi-drug resistant TB would jeopardize TB control. The effect of HIV infection is likely to worsen drug resistance-related problems. Specifically, streptomycin injections pose a risk of HIV transmission. It appears that withdrawal of thiacetazone from HIV infected TB patients causes resistance to more powerful drugs. If these 2 antibiotics cannot be used to treat TB patients, the armamentarium available to control TB in high HIV prevalence countries is reduced, which could foster resistance to the fewer remaining antibiotics. Good management and supervision is needed to prevent resistance to antituberculosis drugs. Surveillance of drug resistance is also needed to monitor the current level and characteristics of the drug resistance problem and to identify effective solutions. Specifically, at the national level, a TB surveillance system can assess the TB control program's performance and assess the need to modify the current treatment policy. It can identify districts or health centers with high levels of drug resistance and determine the risk factors for resistance. WHO will assist developing countries in developing their own surveillance systems. WHO and the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease plan on setting up a network of supranational reference laboratories to determine the quality control and standardization of susceptibility testing needed for international comparison. WHO also plans on supporting national reference laboratories in developing countries.
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