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Your search found 4 Results

  1. 1
    367417

    Zika virus infection: global update on epidemiology and potentially associated clinical manifestations.

    Releve Epidemiologique Hebdomadaire. 2016 Feb 19; 91(7):73-81.

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  2. 2
    332280

    Multidrug and extensively drug-resistant TB (M/XDR-TB): 2010 global report on surveillance and response.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Stop TB Department

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2010. [71] p.

    This new report on anti-tuberculosis (TB) drug resistance by the World Health Organization (WHO) updates "Anti-tuberculosis drug resistance in the world: Report No. 4" published by WHO in 2008. It summarizes the latest data and provides latest estimates of the global epidemic of multidrug and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (M/XDR-TB). For the first time, this report includes an assessment of the progress countries are making to diagnose and treat MDR-TB cases. (Excerpt)
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  3. 3
    319047
    Peer Reviewed

    Evaluating the potential impact of the new Global Plan to Stop TB: Thailand, 2004 -- 2005.

    Varma JK; Wiriyakitjar D; Nateniyom S; Anuwatnonthakate A; Monkongdee P

    Bulletin of the World Health Organization. 2007 Aug; 85(8):586-592.

    WHO's new Global Plan to Stop TB 2006-2015 advises countries with a high burden of tuberculosis (TB) to expand case-finding in the private sector as well as services for patients with HIV and multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB). The objective of this study was to evaluate these strategies in Thailand using data from the Thailand TB Active Surveillance Network, a demonstration project begun in 2004. In October 2004, we began contacting public and private health-care facilities monthly to record data about people diagnosed with TB, assist with patient care, provide HIV counselling and testing, and obtain sputum samples for culture and susceptibility testing. The catchment area included 3.6 million people in four provinces. We compared results from October 2004-September 2005 (referred to as 2005) to baseline data from October 2002-September 2003 (referred to as 2003). In 2005, we ascertained 5841 TB cases (164/100 000), including 2320 new smear-positive cases (65/100 000). Compared with routine passive surveillance in 2003, active surveillance increased reporting of all TB cases by 19% and of new smear-positive cases by 13%. Private facilities diagnosed 634 (11%) of all TB cases. In 2005, 1392 (24%) cases were known to be HIV positive. The proportion of cases with an unknown HIV status decreased from 66% (3226/4904) in 2003 to 23% (1329/5841) in 2005 (P< 0.01). Of 4656 pulmonary cases, mycobacterial culture was performed in 3024 (65%) and MDR-TB diagnosed in 60 (1%). In Thailand, piloting the new WHO strategy increased case-finding and collaboration with the private sector, and improved HIV services for TB patients and the diagnosis of MDR-TB. Further analysis of treatment outcomes and costs is needed to assess this programme's impact and cost effectiveness. (author's)
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  4. 4
    275294

    Generic protocol to estimate the burden of Shigella diarrhoea and dysenteric mortality. Field test version, May 1999.

    Clemens J; Kotloff K; Kay B

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], Department of Vaccines and Biologicals, 1999. 37 p. (WHO/V&B/99.26)

    The WHO Department of Vaccines and Biologicals (V&B) has an increasing interest in vaccines against Shigella, and several candidate vaccines are being tested in clinical trials. The promise of having a new generation of vaccines available in the relatively near future emphasizes the need to understand the disease burden and the epidemiology of Shigella infection in developing countries. The V&B Steering Committee on Epidemiology and Field Research and the V&B Steering Committee on Diarrhoeal Disease Vaccines jointly identified the need for a practical method for immunization programme managers and clinical epidemiologists to assess the local disease burden due to Shigella. At the request of these Steering Committees, this generic protocol was prepared by staff at the U.S National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the University of Maryland, and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. This protocol provides a general outline for a study and describes the main procedures involved. However, it will need to be adapted to the local setting, and details of field work and operational procedures should be added by local investigators with experience in conducting field studies of diarrhoeal diseases. WHO provides this protocol free-of-charge. In return, WHO would appreciate being informed about studies conducted using this protocol. This WHO document should be referenced in any publication resulting from its use. Comments or suggestions for improving this generic protocol are welcome and should be sent to the Department of Vaccines and Biologicals, WHO, 1211 Geneva 27, Switzerland. (excerpt)
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