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Your search found 14 Results

  1. 1
    389069
    Peer Reviewed

    Factors Associated With Extended Breastfeeding in India.

    Mehta AR; Panneer S; Ghosh-Jerath S; Racine EF

    Journal of Human Lactation. 2017 Feb; 33(1):140-148.

    BACKGROUND: Extended breastfeeding duration is common in India. Extended breastfeeding protects the infant from infectious disease and promotes child spacing. In the 1990s, the median breastfeeding duration in India was 24 months. Research aim: This study aimed to investigate the median duration of breastfeeding in India and to identify the factors associated with extended breastfeeding to 24 months as recommended by the World Health Organization. METHODS: This cross-sectional data analysis used nationally representative data from the 2011-2012 Indian Human Development Survey II. The outcome in this study was extended breastfeeding defined as breastfeeding to 24 months or more. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify the factors associated with extended breastfeeding. RESULTS: The median duration of breastfeeding was 12 months; approximately 25% of women breastfed 24 months or more. Women were at greater odds of breastfeeding 24 months or more if the infant was a boy compared with a girl, if the women lived in a rural area compared with an urban area, if the women were married at a young age (< 17 vs. 20 years or older at marriage), and if the delivery was assisted by a friend or relative compared with a doctor. CONCLUSION: The median duration of breastfeeding has decreased by 50% from 1992-1993 to 2011-2012. The women who continue to breastfeed 24 months or more tend to be more traditional (i.e., living in rural areas, marrying young, and having family/friends as birth attendants). Further research to study the health effect of decreased breastfeeding duration is warranted.
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  2. 2
    381486

    Progress towards poliomyelitis eradication: Afghanistan and Pakistan, January 2013-August 2014.

    Releve Epidemiologique Hebdomadaire / Section D'hygiene Du Secretariat De La Societe Des Nations. 2014 Oct 31; 89(44):493-9.

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  3. 3
    351316

    [Analysis of children's nutritional status based on WHO children growth standard in China]

    Wang Y; Chen C; He W

    Wei Sheng Yan Jiu. 2007 Mar; 36(2):203-6.

    OBJECTIVE: To compare children's growth patterns and estimates of malnutrition using the WHO standards versus the NCHS reference in China. METHODS: Data originated from China children nutrition surveillance in 2005, Z-scores and prevalence of malnutrition were compared between standards. RESULTS: There was substantial difference in Z-scores between standards in rural (P < 0.0001). According to the WHO standards, prevalence of underweight in rural was lower than that of underweight based on the NCHS reference (6.1% . vs. 8.6%, P < 0.0001). Except for children under 6 months, all age groups underweight rates were lower according to the WHO standards. Prevalence of stunting in rural was higher based on the WHO standards (16.3% . vs. 13.0%, P < 0.0001), prevalences of stunting under 6 months were 2.1 times of that based on NCHS reference. As for wasting, there were no differences between standards, but wasting was substantially higher during the first half of infancy. Overweight rates based on the WHO standards were higher than those based on NCHS reference in urban (6.7% . vs. 5.4%, P < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: In comparison with NCHS reference, population estimates of malnutrition would vary by age, growth indicator based on WHO standards. The WHO standards could provide a better tool to monitor the rapid and changing rate of growth in early infancy, further analysis on existing data was needed.
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  4. 4
    351110
    Peer Reviewed

    Global lessons from India's poliomyelitis elimination campaign.

    Arora NK; Chaturvedi S; Dasgupta R

    Bulletin of the World Health Organization. 2010 Mar; 88(3):232-4.

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  5. 5
    331756

    Symposium proceedings. HPV Vaccines: New Tools in the Prevention of Cervical Cancer and Other HPV Disease in Asia and the Pacific, Bangkok, Thailand, 2 November 2006.

    HPV Vaccines: New Tools in the Prevention of Cervical Cancer and Other HPV Disease in Asia and the Pacific, Symposium (2006: Bangkok)

    Bangkok, Thailand, Family Health International [FHI], Asia / Pacific Regional Office, 2007. 55 p.

    Cervical cancer -- the most preventable and treatable of all cancers -- is the most common cancer among women in developing countries. This report presents the proceedings of a November 2006 symposium organized by FHI in Bangkok, Thailand, that brought together leading specialists in immunization, cancer prevention, and other disciplines to start building consensus on a comprehensive approach to programming for the prevention and early detection of cervical cancers in the Asia region. Presentations covered such topics as improved screening methods for cervical cancer, the latest research on human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines, and country and social perspectives related to HPV vaccination. Participants concluded that there is a need to 1) further educate health professionals, especially so they can influence policymakers and service planners, and 2) devise communication strategies that will shape debates on HPV vaccines.
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  6. 6
    319047
    Peer Reviewed

    Evaluating the potential impact of the new Global Plan to Stop TB: Thailand, 2004 -- 2005.

    Varma JK; Wiriyakitjar D; Nateniyom S; Anuwatnonthakate A; Monkongdee P

    Bulletin of the World Health Organization. 2007 Aug; 85(8):586-592.

    WHO's new Global Plan to Stop TB 2006-2015 advises countries with a high burden of tuberculosis (TB) to expand case-finding in the private sector as well as services for patients with HIV and multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB). The objective of this study was to evaluate these strategies in Thailand using data from the Thailand TB Active Surveillance Network, a demonstration project begun in 2004. In October 2004, we began contacting public and private health-care facilities monthly to record data about people diagnosed with TB, assist with patient care, provide HIV counselling and testing, and obtain sputum samples for culture and susceptibility testing. The catchment area included 3.6 million people in four provinces. We compared results from October 2004-September 2005 (referred to as 2005) to baseline data from October 2002-September 2003 (referred to as 2003). In 2005, we ascertained 5841 TB cases (164/100 000), including 2320 new smear-positive cases (65/100 000). Compared with routine passive surveillance in 2003, active surveillance increased reporting of all TB cases by 19% and of new smear-positive cases by 13%. Private facilities diagnosed 634 (11%) of all TB cases. In 2005, 1392 (24%) cases were known to be HIV positive. The proportion of cases with an unknown HIV status decreased from 66% (3226/4904) in 2003 to 23% (1329/5841) in 2005 (P< 0.01). Of 4656 pulmonary cases, mycobacterial culture was performed in 3024 (65%) and MDR-TB diagnosed in 60 (1%). In Thailand, piloting the new WHO strategy increased case-finding and collaboration with the private sector, and improved HIV services for TB patients and the diagnosis of MDR-TB. Further analysis of treatment outcomes and costs is needed to assess this programme's impact and cost effectiveness. (author's)
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  7. 7
    312295

    2005 update on the HIV / AIDS epidemic and response in China.

    China. Ministry of Health; Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]; World Health Organization [WHO]

    Beijing, China, National Center for AIDS / STD Prevention and Control, 2006 Jan 24. [19] p.

    Over the past two years, the response to HIV/AIDS across China has intensified, and the Chinese government has strengthened leadership on HIV/AIDS. Effective measures have been launched in each key area of HIV/AIDS prevention, treatment and care work, and the environment for comprehensive work in these areas has improved considerably. This report was jointly prepared by the Ministry of Health of the People's Republic of China, the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) and the World Health Organization (WHO) to describe the current status of China's HIV/AIDS epidemic, progress made over the past year in China's HIV/AIDS response, and key challenges that need to be addressed to stop the spread of AIDS. (excerpt)
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  8. 8
    141423

    [Molecular epidemiology of HIV infection]

    Yin TM

    Zhonghua Liu Xing Bing Xue Za Zhi / Chinese Journal of Epidemiology. 1997 Oct; 18(5):309-311.

    Global HIV infection and AIDS: according to WHO estimates, by mid 1996 there were 7 million cumulative AIDS cases. Today the number of people infected with HIV is even more alarming: roughly 21.8 million, of those 42% are women. By the year 2000 there will be between 40 and 50 million cases. Each day about 8,500 additional people are infected with AIDS; one can say the situation is grim. Currently, the AIDS and HIV epidemic regions are shifting, they have gradually moved from the original sites of North America and West Europe toward the mass populations of developing countries in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. In the Asian region which contains about 60% of the world's population, beginning in 1988, with Thailand and India at the center, an exploding epidemic has taken shape. Recent materials indicate, those infected with HIV in Thailand exceed 700,000, over 2 million in India, and the HIV epidemic has already spread to the near neighbors Burma, southern China, Cambodia, Malaysia and Vietnam. With the accumulation of molecular epidemiology research materials, the complete picture of the causes and characteristics of this massive epidemic happening in the Asian region is gradually becoming clear. (excerpt)
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  9. 9
    297179

    International public health organizations warn of burgeoning HIV / AIDS epidemic in Eastern Europe and Eurasia.

    Connections. 2003 Aug; [2] p..

    A trio of reports issued by international public health groups last month projects a dire future for Eastern Europe and Central Asia if immediate action is not taken to stem the rising tide of HIV/AIDS. Although the onslaught of HIV hit these nations more than a decade after the disease emerged in many other parts of the world, infection rates have skyrocketed during the past five years and are growing faster than in any other region. Currently, Russia and Ukraine are home to the bulk of the 1.2 million HIV-positive individuals living in the region, but the social conditions that are enabling the epidemic to spread so quickly in these two countries-high incidence of unemployment and poverty, rapid social change, increasing rates of substance abuse, a escalating commercial sex trade, and decreasing levels of healthcare services and educational opportunities, for example-are also shared by other nations in the region. Since 1995, pockets of HIV epidemics have sprung up in communities stretching from the Baltics to Eastern Europe, the Caucasus and Central Asia. According to World Bank reports, there are indications that the epidemic is making its way from "high-risk core transmitter groups," such as needle-sharing injecting drug users (IDUs) and commercial sex workers, through bridge populations, such as their sex partners, into the population at large. A World Bank study released July 10 uses the Balkan nations of Bulgaria, Croatia, and Romania to illustrate this phenomenon, citing high levels of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), sharp increases in risky sexual behavior, and a lack of knowledge about HIV/AIDS as key indicators that the deadly disease is poised to make inroads into the general population. (excerpt)
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  10. 10
    282827

    Regional strategic plan to stop TB in the Western Pacific.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Regional Office for the Western Pacific. Taskforce for Stop TB

    Manila, Philippines, WHO, Regional Office for the Western Pacific, 2000. [42] p.

    Mission statement: to significantly reduce morbidity and mortality due to tuberculosis by promoting accessibility and sustainability of the DOTS strategy as part of health system development. The objectives of the Stop TB special project in the Western Pacific are to: reduce the prevalence and mortality of tuberculosis in the Region by half within ten years (by 2010); and ensure that the DOTS strategy is incorporated into country plans for health sector development. (excerpt)
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  11. 11
    282171

    Guidelines for the control of tuberculosis through DOTS strategy in Pacific Island countries.

    Blanc L; Ahn DI; Diletto C

    Manila, Philippines, World Health Organization [WHO], Regional Office for the Western Pacific, 1999. [43] p.

    Each of the small Pacific island countries has its own characteristics that need specific approaches in the implementation of DOTS strategy. The available tuberculosis guidelines are often too complex and too difficult to adapt. So health managers and health workers of these small countries need to have operational guidelines that are practical and simple to assist them in implementing an effective tuberculosis control programme based on the WHO recommended DOTS strategy. The main objectives of the guidelines are as follows: to guide tuberculosis programme managers in the implementation of DOTS strategy and the control of tuberculosis; to guide health workers and community leaders in identifying and referring suspect cases; and to guide health workers, patients and their families towards achieving a cure. As the guidelines are tested in a variety of different situations in the field, comments would be welcome and will help to improve future editions. Comments can be sent to WHO Regional Office for the Western Pacific, Tuberculosis Programme, Chronic Communicable Disease Unit. (excerpt)
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  12. 12
    282165

    Fighting TB -- forging ahead. Overview of the Stop TB Special Project in the Western Pacific Region, 2002.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Regional Office for the Western Pacific. Stop TB Special Project

    Manila, Philippines, WHO, Regional Office for the Western Pacific, 2002. 77 p.

    This report: (i) describes the epidemiological situation of TB control in the Western Pacific Region, (ii) outlines the progress in building and implementing the Stop TB Special Project, (iii) discusses the issues and challenges in reducing TB prevalence in the seven most highrisk countries in the Region, and (iv) appraises the special project’s financial resources and requirements up to 2005. Adequate funds are essential to the success of the Stop TB Special Project and to reaching the targets in TB control. This report thus gives special attention to the seven TB high burden countries’ national Stop TB plans, including their partnership-building and resource mobilization. A summary of their five-year plans, which were endorsed by the second Technical Advisory Group (TAG) meeting of Beijing in June 2001, can be found in Annex 1. (excerpt)
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  13. 13
    184757
    Peer Reviewed

    Transmission intensity index to monitor filariasis infection pressure in vectors for the evaluation of filariasis elimination programmes.

    Sunish IP; Rajendran R; Mani TR; Munirathinam A; Tewari SC

    Tropical Medicine and International Health. 2003 Sep; 8(9):812-819.

    We conducted longitudinal studies on filariasis control in Villupuram district of Tamil Nadu, south India, between 1995 and 2000. Overall, 23 entomological (yearly) data sets were available from seven villages, on indoor resting collections [per man hour (PMH) density and transmission intensity index (TII)] and landing collections on human volunteers [PMH and annual transmission potential (ATP)]. All four indices decreased or increased hand-in-hand with interventions or withdrawal of inputs and remained at high levels without interventions under varied circumstances of experimental design. The correlation coefficients between parameters [PMH: resting vs. landing (r = 0.77); and TII vs. ATP (r = 0.81)] were highly significant (P < 0.001). The former indices from resting collections stand a chance of replacing the latter from landing collections in the evaluation of global filariasis elimination efforts. The TII would appear to serve the purpose of a parameter that can measure infection pressure per unit time in the immediate household surroundings of human beings and can reflect the success or otherwise of control/elimination efforts along with human infection parameters. Moreover, it will not pose any additional risk of new infection(s) and avoids infringement of human rights concerns by the experimental procedures of investigators, unlike ATP that poses such a risk to volunteers. (author's)
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  14. 14
    182917

    Hepatitis B in St Petersburg, Russia (1994-1999): incidence, prevalence and force of infection.

    Beutels P; Shkedy Z; Mukomolov S; Aerts M; Shargorodskaya E

    Journal of Viral Hepatitis. 2003 Mar; 10(2):141-149.

    Hepatitis B (HB) is thought to be an expanding health problem in Russia. The incidence of infection was estimated from mandatorily reported HB cases in St Petersburg. The two-sided t-test for independent samples and the LOESS (locally-weighted regression) smoother were used to compare the age at infection for symptomatic, asymptomatic and chronic infections, by gender. The force of infection was estimated from seroprevalence data (907 sera taken in 1999) using a newly developed nonparametric method based on local polynomials, as well as an earlier method based on isotonic regression and kernel smoothers. With the local polynomial method, pointwise confidence intervals (95%) were constructed by bootstrapping. On average, men contracted HB infection at a significantly younger age than women (in 1999, 21.8 vs 22.7 years, respectively). The overall male to female ratio was 1.92. In 1999 the overall incidence almost doubled compared with the preceding years and tripled among the age groups with highest incidence (15–29-year olds: 85% of cases in 1999). The incidence increase was associated with a lower average age at infection (24.1 years in 1994 vs 22.1 years in 1999). The age and gender-specific force of infection estimates generally confirmed the incidence estimates and emphasized the usefulness of local polynomials to do this. Hence HB transmission in St Petersburg occurs mainly in young adults. The dramatic increase of infections in 1999 was probably due to injecting drug use. Without intervention, HB virus is expected to continue to spread rapidly with a greater proportion of female infections caused by sexual transmission. These trends may also provide an indication for HIV transmission. (author's)
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