Important: The POPLINE website will retire on September 1, 2019. Click here to read about the transition.

Your search found 6 Results

  1. 1
    375003

    WHO guidelines for the treatment of Chlamydia trachomatis.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2016. [56] p.

    Since the publication of the WHO Guidelines for the management of sexually transmitted infections in 2003, changes in the epidemiology of STIs and advancements in prevention, diagnosis and treatment necessitate changes in STI management. These guidelines provide updated treatment recommendations for common infections caused by C. trachomatis based on the most recent evidence; they form one of several modules of guidelines for specific STIs. It is strongly recommended that countries take updated global guidance into account as they establish standardized national protocols, adapting this guidance to the local epidemiological situation and antimicrobial susceptibility data. The objectives of these guidelines are: to provide evidence-based guidance on treatment of infection with C. trachomatis; and to support countries to update their national guidelines for treatment of chlamydial infection.
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    375002

    WHO guidelines for the treatment of Treponema pallidum (syphilis).

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2016. [60] p.

    Since the publication of the WHO Guidelines for the management of sexually transmitted infections in 2003, changes in the epidemiology of STIs and advancements in prevention, diagnosis and treatment necessitate changes in STI management. These guidelines provide updated treatment recommendations for treatment of Treponema pallidum (syphilis) based on the most recent evidence. They form one of several modules of guidelines for specific STIs. It is strongly recommended that countries take updated global guidance into account as they establish standardized national protocols and adapt it to the local epidemiological situation and antimicrobial susceptibility data. The objectives of these guidelines are: to provide evidence-based guidance on treatment of infection with Treponema pallidum; and to support countries to update their national guidelines for treatment of Treponema pallidum.
    Add to my documents.
  3. 3
    375001

    WHO guidelines for the treatment of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2016. [64] p.

    Since the publication of the WHO Guidelines for the management of sexually transmitted infections in 2003, changes in the epidemiology of STIs and advancements in prevention, diagnosis and treatment necessitate changes in STI management. There is an urgent need to update treatment recommendations for gonococcal infections to respond to changing antimicrobial resistance (AMR) patterns of N. gonorrhoeae. High-level resistance to previously recommended quinolones is widespread and decreased susceptibility to the extended-spectrum (third-generation) cephalosporins, another recommended first-line treatment in the 2003 guidelines, is increasing and several countries have reported treatment failures. These guidelines for the treatment of common infections caused by N. gonorrhoeae form one of several modules of guidelines for specific STIs. It is strongly recommended that countries take updated global guidance into account as they establish standardized national protocols, adapting this guidance to the local epidemiological situation and antimicrobial susceptibility data. The objectives of these guidelines are: to provide evidence-based guidance on treatment of infection with N. gonorrhoeae; and to support countries to update their national guidelines for treatment of gonococcal infection.
    Add to my documents.
  4. 4
    312155

    Promoting evidence-based sexual and reproductive health care.

    Progress in Reproductive Health Research. 2005; (71):1-8.

    The WHO Department of Reproductive Health and Research (RHR) has two initiatives aimed at promoting evidence-based sexual and reproductive health care. One is devoted to Implementing Best Practices (IBP), the other to mapping the best sexual and reproductive health practices. In the latter case, the WHO Reproductive Health Library (RHL) is used as a key instrument for documenting and disseminating the best practices. Both initiatives provide health-care practitioners with information to help them choose which methods, techniques, interventions, medications and other tools work in a given set of circumstances and settings, and which don't. That information, in current health parlance, is "evidence-based". To the extent that practitioners put the evidence to use in their practices, the members of the communities they serve can be confident that they are receiving the best advice and treatment that current scientific knowledge can provide. Both the IBP and RHL take advantage of the global "information networks" that the scientific and health communities have developed over the years and that, with the advent of electronic communication, have become increasingly "virtual". In this respect, what is known as the "scientific literature" has become a global network for distributing and sharing information. IBP initiative, for example, uses two tools, the Knowledge Gateway and a virtual library, that foster rapid access to the evidence and its continuous enrichment and updating through a sharing of information and experience. The RHL compresses into an Internet web site (as well as a single compact disc) a wealth of information based on evidence validated by peer review and commented on by experts. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  5. 5
    139799

    Third draft report, April 28. Sexually Transmitted Diseases Working Group, April 22-24, 1991.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Sexually Transmitted Diseases Working Group

    [Unpublished] 1991. Presented at the 1st International Course on Planning and Managing STD Control Activities in Developing Countries, Antwerp, Belgium, September 9-21, 1991. [15] p.

    Comprised of an interdisciplinary group of scientists from both developed and developing countries, a sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) research working group met April 22-24, 1991, in Geneva to develop recommendations for the WHO/STD program on global STD research needs and priorities. The group took direction from a September 1989 meeting of a WHO consultative group to the WHO STD program, and a meeting of the research sub-committee of the WHO AIDS/STD Task Force held in July 1990, to consider global strategies of coordination for AIDS and STD control programs. Recommendations for the WHO/STD program on global STD research needs and priorities would stress the needs of developing countries in the areas of cost-effective prevention, case detection and management, surveillance, and program evaluation. The relevancy of potential projects to practical, operational issues was stressed throughout the meeting, and the unique global role played by the WHO STD program in encouraging and coordinating STD research and control efforts, as well as in working with donor agencies, were central themes of the meeting. The working group determined that it should prioritize research needs based upon selected factors, and consider how potential plans addressing such needs could be accomplished and funded. Program support, case management, behavior, epidemiology, and interventions were identified as broad areas of research need.
    Add to my documents.
  6. 6
    139806

    Sexually transmitted diseases research needs: report of a WHO consultative group, Copenhagen, 13-14 September 1989.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Programme for Sexually Transmitted Diseases

    [Unpublished] 1991. Presented at the 1st International Course on Planning and Managing STD Control Activities in Developing Countries, Antwerp, Belgium, September 9-21, 1991. 31 p.

    In response to the growing needs for research into sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), the STD Program of the World Health Organization (WHO) in September 1989 convened a small interdisciplinary consultative group of scientists from both developing and more developed countries to review STD research priorities. The consultation was organized based upon the belief that a joint consideration of global STD research priorities and local research capabilities would increase overall research capacity by coordinating the efforts of scientists from around the world to get the job done. Participants considered the areas of biomedical research, clinical and epidemiological research, behavioral research, and operations research. However, research needs directly related to HIV were not considered except where they interfaced with research on other STDs. The above areas of research, as well as the expansion of interregional and interdisciplinary collaborations, the strengthening of research institutions, developing and strengthening research training, and facilitating technology transfer and the use of marketing systems are discussed.
    Add to my documents.