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  1. 1
    372957

    Characterizing the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the Middle East and North Africa: time for strategic action.

    Abu-Raddad LJ; Akala FA; Semini I; Riedner G; Wilson D; Tawil O

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, 2010. [304] p. (World Bank Report No. 54889)

    This study is a continuation of the previous sector review, conducted in 2004. The 2008 review had two main objectives. This review is primarily an update on the situation. In its development strategy, Benin gave considerable importance to the health of its population. This effort is part of the long-term vision of the country. Improving health status, especially for the poor, is one of eight strategic directions for that vision. Similarly, on a more operational level, this objective is reflected in the current Growth Strategy for Poverty Reduction (GPRS 2007-2009). Benin is particularly committed towards the Millennium Development Goals, including 3 on the health sector. This review was also an opportunity to further analyze the constraints in the health system, consistent with the new strategy Health Nutrition and Population World Bank, Strategy adopted in 2007. But this exercise was not intended merely to be analytical. It also aimed to enrich the political dialogue between, on one hand, the actors in health and, secondly, the World Bank and other development partners. This effort relates more specifically to some themes such as governance, private sector involvement and alignment of partners' efforts (called technical and financial partners in Benin or PTFs). From this perspective, the journal is also a contribution to Benin's efforts to advance the IHP (International Health Partnership Plus). This initiative is now the main tool for implementing the Paris Declaration. In practice, the journal has sought to contribute to the consensus between the Ministry of Health and the donor group on the diagnosis of the health system and the changes needed to strengthen it. Several guidelines have emerged stronger from this discussion, particularly in the area of governance of the health system. Beyond the reinforcement of the various components of the health system, two fundamental principles should guide the transformation of this system: 1) A principle of corporate governance: through decentralization of the health system, health facilities must have their basic needs better taken into account (hence the need for bottom-up planning) and especially as more independent financially administrative; and 2) A principle of individual governance: health workers should be strongly encouraged to improve their performance (competence, productivity and compliance of patients). Given the limited success of measures to strengthen inspections and other controls "top-down, this incentive can only come from clients, either directly (i.e., bonuses based on cost recovery), or preferably indirectly with a mechanism for payment by results funded by the state and possibly partners.
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  2. 2
    357077
    Peer Reviewed

    Routes of infection: Exports and HIV incidence in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Oster E

    Journal of the European Economic Association. 2012 Oct; 10(5):1025-1058.

    This paper estimates whether exports affect the incidence of HIV in Africa. This relationship has implications for HIV prevention policy as well as for the consequences of trade increases in Africa. I estimate this impact using two sources of data on HIV incidence, one generated based on UNAIDS estimates and the other based on observed HIV mortality. These data are combined with data on export value and volume. I find a fairly consistent positive relationship between exports and new HIV infections: doubling exports leads to a 10%-70% increase in new HIV infections. Consistent with theory, this relationship is larger in areas with higher baseline HIV prevalence. I interpret the result as suggesting that increased exports increase the movement of people (trucking), which increases sexual contacts. Consistent with this interpretation, the effect is larger for export growth than for income growth per se and is larger in areas with more extensive road networks.
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  3. 3
    329179

    The past, present, and future of reproductive health surveillance in the US-Mexico border region [editorial]

    McDonald JA

    Preventing Chronic Disease. 2008 Oct; 5(4):A110.

    This editorial discusses reproductive health surveillance in the US- Mexico border region. It touches on past, present and future projects for that area including the United States- Mexico Border Health Commission (USMBHC) and the Brownsville-Matamoros Sister City Project for Women’s Health (BMSCP).
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  4. 4
    321121

    UNAIDS practical guidelines for intensifying HIV prevention: Towards universal access.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2007. [66] p. (UNAIDS/07.07E; JC1274E)

    These Practical Guidelines for Intensifying HIV Prevention: Towards Universal Access are designed to provide policy makers and planners with practical guidance to tailor their national HIV prevention response so that they respond to the epidemic dynamics and social context of the country and populations who remain most vulnerable to and at risk of HIV infection. They have been developed in consultation with the UNAIDS cosponsors, international collaborating partners, government, civil society leaders and other experts. They build on Intensifying HIV Prevention: UNAIDS Policy Position Paper and the UNAIDS Action Plan on Intensifying HIV Prevention. In 2006, governments committed themselves to scaling up HIV prevention and treatment responses to ensure universal access by 2010. While in the past five years treatment access has expanded rapidly, the number of new HIV infections has not decreased - estimated at 4.3 (3.6-6.6) million in 2006 - with many people unable to access prevention services to prevent HIV infection. These Guidelines recognize that to sustain the advances in antiretroviral treatment and to ensure true universal access requires that prevention services be scaled up simultaneously with treatment. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    314908

    Recent experiences in infectious diseases: strengthening public health infrastructure in disease surveillance.

    Cash RA

    Contact. 2005 Jan; (179):29-31.

    In the past century there have been remarkable achievements in the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases. Bacteria and viruses have been identified; laboratory techniques have greatly advanced; the pathogenesis and epidemiology have been defined for most diseases; and antibiotics and vaccines have been developed to treat and prevent a host of discusses. Examples are everywhere. We have eradicated smallpox and come close to doing the same for polio. Inexpensive treatments such as Oral Rehydration Therapy (ORT) for diarrhoea have greatly reduced mortality and morbidity among children. Improvements in water and sanitation helped to reduce expose to certain pathogens. Yet, despite these great successes in controlling and treating infectious diseases, they remain a serious medical burden in both developing and industrialized in countries. It is estimated that about 15 million of the 57 million annual deaths (about 26%) are directly related to infectious diseases. This estimate does not include deaths due to the consequences of past infections (for example, rheumatic heart disease) or from complications of chronic infections (for example, hepatocellular carcinoma from hepatitis B infection). (excerpt)
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