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Your search found 4 Results

  1. 1
    372957

    Characterizing the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the Middle East and North Africa: time for strategic action.

    Abu-Raddad LJ; Akala FA; Semini I; Riedner G; Wilson D; Tawil O

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, 2010. [304] p. (World Bank Report No. 54889)

    This study is a continuation of the previous sector review, conducted in 2004. The 2008 review had two main objectives. This review is primarily an update on the situation. In its development strategy, Benin gave considerable importance to the health of its population. This effort is part of the long-term vision of the country. Improving health status, especially for the poor, is one of eight strategic directions for that vision. Similarly, on a more operational level, this objective is reflected in the current Growth Strategy for Poverty Reduction (GPRS 2007-2009). Benin is particularly committed towards the Millennium Development Goals, including 3 on the health sector. This review was also an opportunity to further analyze the constraints in the health system, consistent with the new strategy Health Nutrition and Population World Bank, Strategy adopted in 2007. But this exercise was not intended merely to be analytical. It also aimed to enrich the political dialogue between, on one hand, the actors in health and, secondly, the World Bank and other development partners. This effort relates more specifically to some themes such as governance, private sector involvement and alignment of partners' efforts (called technical and financial partners in Benin or PTFs). From this perspective, the journal is also a contribution to Benin's efforts to advance the IHP (International Health Partnership Plus). This initiative is now the main tool for implementing the Paris Declaration. In practice, the journal has sought to contribute to the consensus between the Ministry of Health and the donor group on the diagnosis of the health system and the changes needed to strengthen it. Several guidelines have emerged stronger from this discussion, particularly in the area of governance of the health system. Beyond the reinforcement of the various components of the health system, two fundamental principles should guide the transformation of this system: 1) A principle of corporate governance: through decentralization of the health system, health facilities must have their basic needs better taken into account (hence the need for bottom-up planning) and especially as more independent financially administrative; and 2) A principle of individual governance: health workers should be strongly encouraged to improve their performance (competence, productivity and compliance of patients). Given the limited success of measures to strengthen inspections and other controls "top-down, this incentive can only come from clients, either directly (i.e., bonuses based on cost recovery), or preferably indirectly with a mechanism for payment by results funded by the state and possibly partners.
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  2. 2
    338994
    Peer Reviewed

    The World Health Organization and the Globalization of Chronic Noncommunicable Disease.

    Weisz G; Vignola-Gagne E

    Population and Development Review. 2015 Sep 15; 41(3):507-532.

    Chronic noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) in low- and middle-income countries have recently provoked a surge of public interest. This article examines the policy literature-notably the archives and publications of the World Health Organization (WHO), which has dominated this field-to analyze the emergence and consolidation of this new agenda. Starting with programs to control cardiovascular disease in the 1970s, experts from Eastern and Western Europe had by the late 1980s consolidated a program for the prevention of NCD risk factors at the WHO. NCDs remained a relatively minor concern until the collaboration of World Bank health economists with WHO epidemiologists led to the Global Burden of Disease study that provided an “evidentiary breakthrough” for NCD activism by quantifying the extent of the problem. Soon after, WHO itself, facing severe criticism, underwent major reform. NCD advocacy contributed to revitalizing WHO's normative and coordinative functions. By leading a growing advocacy coalition, within which The Lancet played a key role, WHO established itself as a leading institution in this domain. However, ever-widening concern with NCDs has not yet led to major reallocation of funding in favor of NCD programs in the developing world.
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  3. 3
    296687
    Peer Reviewed

    Four malaria success stories: how malaria burden was successfully reduced in Brazil, Eritrea, India, and Vietnam.

    Barat LM

    American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 2006 Jan; 74(1):12-16.

    While many countries struggle to control malaria, four countries, Brazil, Eritrea, India, and Vietnam, have successfully reduced malaria burden. To determine what led these countries to achieve impact, published and unpublished reports were reviewed and selected program and partner staff were interviewed to identify common factors that contributed to these successes. Common success factors included conducive country conditions, a targeted technical approach using a package of effective tools, data-driven decision-making, active leadership at all levels of government, involvement of communities, decentralized implementation and control of finances, skilled technical and managerial capacity at national and sub-national levels, hands-on technical and programmatic support from partner agencies, and sufficient and flexible financing. All these factors were essential in achieving success. If the goals of Roll Back Malaria are to be achieved, governments and their partners must take the lessons learned from these program successes and apply them in other affected countries. (author's)
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  4. 4
    282827

    Regional strategic plan to stop TB in the Western Pacific.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Regional Office for the Western Pacific. Taskforce for Stop TB

    Manila, Philippines, WHO, Regional Office for the Western Pacific, 2000. [42] p.

    Mission statement: to significantly reduce morbidity and mortality due to tuberculosis by promoting accessibility and sustainability of the DOTS strategy as part of health system development. The objectives of the Stop TB special project in the Western Pacific are to: reduce the prevalence and mortality of tuberculosis in the Region by half within ten years (by 2010); and ensure that the DOTS strategy is incorporated into country plans for health sector development. (excerpt)
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