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Your search found 6 Results

  1. 1
    329180

    Reproductive health surveillance in the US-Mexico border region: beyond the border (and into the future) [editorial]

    Kotelchuck M

    Preventing Chronic Disease. 2008 Oct; 5(4):A109.

    This editorial examines reproductive health surveillance in the US- Mexico border region. It offers improvements for reproductive health data system methods and recommendations for sustainability of the project. It also proposes revisions to the Brownsville-Matamoros Sister City Project for Women’s Health (BMSCP) in the following areas: maternal birthing experiences, women’s health over the life course, migration history, acculturation/cultural identity/border region identity, Latina reproductive health, and MCH policy relevance.
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  2. 2
    329179

    The past, present, and future of reproductive health surveillance in the US-Mexico border region [editorial]

    McDonald JA

    Preventing Chronic Disease. 2008 Oct; 5(4):A110.

    This editorial discusses reproductive health surveillance in the US- Mexico border region. It touches on past, present and future projects for that area including the United States- Mexico Border Health Commission (USMBHC) and the Brownsville-Matamoros Sister City Project for Women’s Health (BMSCP).
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  3. 3
    283992

    HIV / AIDS: implications for poverty reduction.

    Loewenson R

    New York, New York, United Nations Development Programme [UNDP], Bureau for Development Policy [BDP], Special Initiative on HIV / AIDS, 2001. 27 p.

    The devastation caused by HIV/AIDS is unique because it is depriving families, communities and entire nations of their young and most productive people. The epidemic is deepening poverty, reversing human development achievements, worsening gender inequalities, eroding the ability of governments to maintain essential services, reducing labour productivity and supply, and putting a brake on economic growth. These worsening conditions in turn make people and households even more at risk of, or vulnerable to, the epidemic, and sabotages global and national efforts to improve access to treatment and care. This cycle must be broken to ensure a sustainable solution to the HIV/AIDS crisis. The response to HIV/AIDS so far has focused, rightly so, on the challenge of containing the epidemic and preventing new infections through advocacy, information and education campaigns, behaviour change communication, condom distribution, programmes targeting groups that are particularly vulnerable to infection, and other key interventions. The other part of the response is focusing on treatment and care for people living with HIV and AIDS — efforts that are expected to intensify as new treatments become more accessible and affordable. Both prevention and treatment are top priorities in not only saving lives and reducing human suffering, but also in limiting the future impact on human development and poverty reduction efforts. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    195997
    Peer Reviewed

    Malaria: reemerging disease in Africa.

    Nchinda TC

    Emerging Infectious Diseases. 1998 Jul-Sep; 4(3):398-403.

    A recent upsurge of malaria in endemic-disease areas with explosive epidemics in many parts of Africa is probably caused by many factors, including rapidly spreading resistance to antimalarial drugs, climatic changes, and population movements. In Africa, malaria is caused by Plasmodium falciparum and is transmitted by Anopheles gambiae complex. Control efforts have been piecemeal and not coordinated. Strategies for control should have a solid research base both for developing antimalarial drugs and vaccines and for better understanding the pathogenesis, vector dynamics, epidemiology, and socioeconomic aspects of the disease. An international collaborative approach is needed to build appropriate research in a national context and to effectively translate research results into practical applications in the field. The Multilateral Initiative for Malaria in Africa can combine all of the above strategies to plan and coordinate partnerships, networking, and innovative approaches between African scientists and their Northern partners. (author's)
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  5. 5
    182221
    Peer Reviewed

    African countries to cooperate on epidemic control. Experts hope that sharing expertise and resources will help control disease outbreaks in the region.

    Wendo C

    Lancet. 2003 Jul 19; 362(9379):222.

    Six countries of the Africa Great Lakes sub-region have signed an agreement to cooperate on the prevention and control of epidemics and diseases that can be prevented by vaccination. Their health ministers signed the protocol of cooperation in the Ugandan capital, Kampala, on June 27. According to a 14-page document the six ministers released jointly, the countries would share epidemic information across borders, harmonise treatment policies and protocols, and standardise laboratory procedures and techniques. They also agreed to coordinate mass vaccination activities, implement joint activities aimed at eliminating measles, vitamin A deficiencies, and maternal and neonatal tetanus. c(excerpt)
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  6. 6
    139806

    Sexually transmitted diseases research needs: report of a WHO consultative group, Copenhagen, 13-14 September 1989.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Programme for Sexually Transmitted Diseases

    [Unpublished] 1991. Presented at the 1st International Course on Planning and Managing STD Control Activities in Developing Countries, Antwerp, Belgium, September 9-21, 1991. 31 p.

    In response to the growing needs for research into sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), the STD Program of the World Health Organization (WHO) in September 1989 convened a small interdisciplinary consultative group of scientists from both developing and more developed countries to review STD research priorities. The consultation was organized based upon the belief that a joint consideration of global STD research priorities and local research capabilities would increase overall research capacity by coordinating the efforts of scientists from around the world to get the job done. Participants considered the areas of biomedical research, clinical and epidemiological research, behavioral research, and operations research. However, research needs directly related to HIV were not considered except where they interfaced with research on other STDs. The above areas of research, as well as the expansion of interregional and interdisciplinary collaborations, the strengthening of research institutions, developing and strengthening research training, and facilitating technology transfer and the use of marketing systems are discussed.
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