Your search found 19 Results

  1. 1
    313945
    Peer Reviewed

    Quality of life of women with gynecologic cancer: Associated factors.

    Vaz AF; Pinto-Neto AM; Conde DM; Costa-Paiv L; Morais SS

    Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics. 2007 Dec; 276(6):583-589.

    The objective was to evaluate quality of life (QOL) and identify its associated factors in a cohort of women with gynecologic cancer. A cross-sectional study was conducted, including 103 women with cervical or endometrial cancer, aged between 18 and 75 years who were receiving their entire treatment at the institution where the investigation was carried out. QOL was measured by the World Health Organization's QOL instrument-abbreviated version (WHOQOL-BREF). Clinical and sociodemographic characteristics, in addition to prevalence of cancer-related symptoms prior to radiotherapy were investigated. Bivariate analysis was performed, applying the Mann-Whitney test. Multivariate analysis was used to identify factors associated with QOL. The mean age of the participants was 56.8 plus or minus 11.6 years. The study included 67 (65%) women with cervical cancer and 36 (35%) women with endometrial cancer. Most participants were at an advanced stage (63.1%). The most common complaints were pain (49.5%) and vaginal bleeding (36.9%). The prevalence of anemia was 22.3%. On multivariate analysis, it was observed that anemia (P = 0.006) and nausea and/or vomiting (P = 0.010) determined impairment in physical domain. Pain negatively influenced physical domain (P = 0.001), overall QOL (P = 0.024), and general health (P = 0.013), while the history of surgery positively affected general health (P = 0.001). Cancer-related symptoms were factors that most interfered with QOL in women with gynecologic cancer. Therefore, more attention should be focused on identifying these symptoms, adopting measures to minimize their repercussions on QOL. (author's)
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  2. 2
    010086

    Research on the menopause.

    World Health Organization. Scientific Group

    World Health Organization Technical Report Series. 1981; (670):1-120.

    This report includes the collective views of a World Health Organization (WHO) Scientific Group on Research on the Menopause that met in Geneva during December 1980. It includes information on the following: 1) the endocrinology of the menopause and the postmenopausal period (changes in gonadotropins and estrogens immediately prior to the menopause and changes in gonadotropin and steroid hormone levels after the menopause); 2) the age distribution of the menopause (determining the age at menopause, factors influencing the age at menopause, and the range of ages at menopause and the definition of premature and delayed menopause); 3) sociocultural significance of the menopause in different settings; 4) symptoms associated with the menopause (vasomotor symptoms, psychological symptoms, disturbances of sexuality, and insomnia); 5) disorders resulting from, or possibly accelerated by, the menopause (osteoporosis, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, and arthritic disorders); 6) risks, with particular reference to neoplasia, of therapeutic estrogens and progestins given to peri- and postmenopausal women (endometrial cancer, breast cancer, and gallbladder disease); 7) fertility regulating methods for women approaching the menopause (fertility and the need for family planning in women approaching the menopause, problems of family planning in perimenopausal women, and considerations with regard to individual methods of family planning in women approaching the menopause); and 8) estrogen and the health care management of perimenopausal and postmenopausal women. At this time some controversy exists as to whether there is a menopausal syndrome of somatic and psychological symptoms and illness. There are virtually no data on the age distribution of the menopause and no information on its sociocultural significance in the developing countries. The subject of risks and benefits of estrogen therapy in peri- and postmenopausal women is of much importance in view of the large number of prescriptions issued for this medication in developed countries, which indicates their frequrnt use, and the different interpretations and opinions among epidemiologists and clinicians on both past and current studies on this subject. Specific recommendations made by the Scientific Group appear at the end of each section of the report. The following were among the general recommendations made: WHO sponsored research should be undertaken to determine the impact on health service needs of the rapidly increasing numbers of postmenopausal women in developing countries; uniform terminology should be adopted by health care workers with regard to the menopause; uniform endocrine standards should be developed which can be applied to the description of peri- and postmenopausal conditions and diseases; and descriptive epidemiological studies of the age at menopause should be performed in a variety of settings.
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  3. 3
    782141

    Steroid contraception and the risk of neoplasia.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Scientific Group

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 1978. (World Health Organization Technical Report Series No. 619) 54 p

    Studies on steroid contraception (SC) and risk of neoplasia are reviewed. Methodological issues in neoplasia etiology studies include: 1) possibility of a latent period between exposure to cause and disease development; 2) cumulative effects of prolonged or repeated SC exposure; 3) discontinued drugs or dosage schedules; 4) time of exposure (adolescence or prenatal, e.g.); 5) isolation of specific causes among multiple risks; and 6) variations in neoplasma diagnoses. The 4 epidemiological approaches to SC-associated neoplasia studies have inherent shortcomings, but cohorts yield significant associations. Relative risk (ratio of disease incidence among exposed vs. nonexposed persons) is an index of association only, not evidence of cause and effect. Benign breast neoplasia risk was reduced by current SC use of >2 years, and weak evidence points to a residual protective effect, apparently associated with progestogen dose. Aggregated breast cancer data show no clear adverse or beneficial effect of SC use; however, evidence suggests SCs may increase breast cancer risk in population subgroups (e.g., young women). Only short-term evidence is available; hence, no inference of long-term SC breast cancer effects is possible. No beneficial effect of SCs on uterine fibroids is evident, but sequential SCs, no longer marketed, may have increased risk to endometrial carcinoma. Inconclusive data suggest SCs may decrease ovarian cancer risk. Increased risk of cervical dysplasia and carcinoma in situ is associated with SC use, especially long-term use by women with predisposing factors. Risk of hepatocellular adenoma of the liver increases with prolonged SC exposure, especially high dose. Relevance of existing data from more developed countries to disease risk in less developed ones is discussed, and recommendations made.
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  4. 4
    660297

    Basic and clinical aspects of intra-uterine devices. Report of a WHO scientific group.

    WHO SCIENTIFIC GROUP

    Geneva, World Health Organization, 1966. (Technical Report Series NO. 332).

    The value and possible hazards of IUDs are discussed. Grafenberg developed a metal ring IUD in 1928. There was initial enthusiasm about the device, but it became discredited and interest was not revived in the method until 1959. Today, various shapes, sizes, and materials are employed in making IUD'S. No single cause or mechanism of action of an IUD has so far come to light. In sub-human primates the IUD causes accelerated passage of ova through the tube and the rest of the reproductive tract appears to be the major, but not necessarily the only, mechanism, of action. In ruminants, the contraceptive action of the IUD is exerted, at least in part, at the ovarian level. In rats, mice, rabbits, and ferrets, the main effect of the IUD is suppression of the implantation. It is concluded that the action of the IUDs in the human species is exerted before the stage of implantation. The most effective devices are associated with an incidence of 1.8 to 2.9 pregnancies per 100 insertions during the first year of use. The frequency of spontaneous expulsion ranges from about 5% to over 20% depending on the type of device. About one half of all expulsions occur in the first 3 months and comparatively few after the first year. The incidence of removal for medical reasons ranges from approximately 10% to 25% of first insertions during the first year. The method can be used successfully by almost 3 out of every 4 women who adopt it. Side effect and complications include bleeding and pain and less frequently pelvic inflammatory disease and perforation. The only absolute contraindications to the use of IUDs are: (1) active pelvic inflammatory disease, and (2) pregnancy, proven or suspected. Research needs are noted.
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  5. 5
    114088

    Depot medroxyprogesterone acetate contraception and the risk of breast and gynecologic cancer.

    Kaunitz AM

    JOURNAL OF REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE. 1996 May; 41(5 Suppl):419-25.

    This article reviews recent epidemiological data assessing the risk of breast, endometrial, ovarian, and cervical cancer in women using the injectable contraceptive depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA). A review is also provided of epidemiological and biostatistical concepts which relate to the literature on the relationship between the use of hormonal contraception and cancer. Breast cancer is a common and lethal disease in the US, and evidence suggests that gonadal steroids play a role in the development of breast cancer. Two major case control studies (one in New Zealand and the other under the auspices of the World Health Organization [WHO]) as well as a pooled analysis of these studies found no increased overall breast cancer risk in DMPA users. A currently unexplained pattern of increased risk in recent users mimics that seen with oral contraceptive (OC) use and term pregnancy. A WHO hospital-based study of the relationship between endometrial cancer and DMPA use found a protective effect of DMPA which appeared to be longterm and as great as that associated with OCs. Whereas it is plausible that DMPA, which suppresses ovulation, would lower the risk of ovarian cancer in users, a WHO case-control and hospital-based study failed to uncover such a protective effect. Studies of the routine use of DMPA in nulliparous women (who have higher risk of ovarian cancer) will shed more light on any effect DMPA may have on ovarian cancer. The unique epidemiology of cervical cancer (including number of sexual partners, use of barrier contraception, and frequent screening) makes it difficult to assess any association with contraceptive use. However, a large population-based, case-control study in Costa Rica; a WHO hospital-based, case-control study in Thailand, Mexico, and Kenya; and a study in New Zealand indicate that the risk of cervical neoplasia does not appear to be affected by DMPA use. While some issues regarding DMPA and the risk of reproductive tract carcinoma remain to be resolved, clinicians can be reassured that, for appropriately selected clients, the substantial benefits of DMPA outweigh any risks.
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  6. 6
    094457
    Peer Reviewed

    Depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) and cancer: memorandum from a WHO meeting.

    Boyle P; Chilvers C; Ferraz E; Hulka B; King R; La Vecchia C; Petitti D; Lumbiganon P; Skegg D; Thomas D

    BULLETIN OF THE WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION. 1993; 71(6):669-76.

    Depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) is a highly effective long-acting progestational contraceptive, which is administered by injection. DMPA has been widely used in Thailand and New Zealand. The licensing, acceptability, and prevalence of use have been influenced by concern that DMPA may increase the risk of cancer, in particular cancer of the breast. The results of toxicological tests in animals and epidemiological studies in humans concerning the carcinogenicity of DMPA are reviewed. Animals injected with DMPA were exposed to far greater concentrations of the progestogen than were animals tested with orally administered 19-nortestosterone derivatives. In beagle dogs, a unique response to DMPA led to increased serum growth hormone, which was probably responsible for the tumorigenic effect of DMPA on the mammary gland. However, women taking contraceptive doses of DMPA have no significant elevation of serum growth hormone. Available toxicological data do not seem to indicate that DMPA is different from other progestogens in its tumorigenic potential. Epidemiological studies reassure that use of DMPA does not increase breast cancer risk overall. Elevated risks in the same or similar subgroups were observed in the WHO and New Zealand studies, consistent with an acceleration in detection of pre-existing cancer. The data were not compatible with DMPA as an initiating agent. Research is needed on the biological mechanisms of action of progestogens on the human breast. Findings from studies of DMPA and invasive cervical cancer showed no overall increase in risk of cervical cancer and no association between DMPA and cervical cancer. Data from the WHO study provided evidence that DMPA protects against endometrial cancer and that DMPA use was not associated with either an increased or decreased risk of ovarian cancer. Therefore, restriction of DMPA use as contraceptive on the grounds of risk of neoplasia is not recommended.
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  7. 7
    099298
    Peer Reviewed

    Preface -- updating DMPA safety.

    Meirik O

    CONTRACEPTION. 1994 Mar; 49(3):185-8.

    Depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) is currently used for contraception by about nine million women in more than 90 countries. DMPA injected intramuscularly at a dose of 150 mg every 3 months, is among the most effective reversible contraceptive methods. The reluctance of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to approve DMPA in 1992 was attributed to the occurrence of mammary neoplasia in beagle dogs and of endometrial cancer in two of sixteen rhesus monkeys after long-term DMPA treatment. The beagle dog responds to DMPA with a release of growth hormone which is probably the cause of the tumorigenic effect of DMPA on the mammary gland. Around 1990 findings were published from a WHO multicenter study in Kenya, Mexico and Thailand and studies from Costa Rica and New Zealand. In 1993, a WHO meeting of experts reviewed the available data on use of DMPA and cancer risk in women as well as recent toxicology data. DMPA exerts a protective effect against endometrial cancer. The epidemiological studies report no association between the risk of ovarian cancer and the use of DMPA. There was a lack of an association between cervical cancer and DMPA. Two well-designed epidemiological studies did not provide evidence for an increase in overall risk of breast cancer among women having used DMPA. However, both studies reported a weak association between current and recent use of DMPA and breast cancer although there was no evidence of increased risk for women who had stopped using DMPA several years ago. Women who were less than 35 years old at diagnosis, an age at which breast cancer is rare, also showed a slightly increased risk. DMPA can cause an irregular bleeding pattern, it is not immediately irreversible, and there is a relatively slow return of fertility after discontinuation. Yet for women who wish for medium- or long-term contraception, DMPA is one of the alternatives to be considered.
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  8. 8
    077616

    Oral contraceptives and gynecologic cancer: an update for the 1990s.

    Kaunitz AM

    AMERICAN JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY. 1992 Oct; 167(4 Pt 2):1171-6.

    The largest case control study on the association between oral contraceptive (OC) use and cancer is the US Cancer and Steroid Hormone (CASH) study. Since it did not use hospital-based patients as controls, it eliminated some biases. Since OCs suppress ovulation and suppressed ovulation is linked with reduced risk of ovarian cancer, scientists believe OCs may reduce this cancer risk. The CASH study shows that OC use indeed decreases the risk of ovarian cancer 40% (relative risk [RR]=.6 and this protection lasts for more than 10 years after OC discontinuation. Protection increases with duration of OC use (<1 year RR=.6 and >10 years RR=.2). Estrogenic stimulation of the endometrium without ample progestational protection causes endometrial cancer. Thus combined OCs which have estrogen and progestin components should reduce the risk of endometrial cancer. The CASH study reveals OC use for at least 12 months reduces this risk 50%. OCs have a protective effect for at least 15 years after stopping OC use. In addition, UK national mortality data show OC use caused the decline in ovarian cancer mortality and a 40% decrease in endometrial cancer mortality over the last 20 years. A WHO 7-county case control study indicates that OC users in developing countries have the same protective effect against ovarian and endometrial cancer as those in developed countries. Studies of OC use and cervical cancer have had conflicting results due to 3 biases: cervical cancer is associated with sexual behavior and is therefore a sexually transmitted disease; detection bias. A study in Costa Rica conducted by CDC study has addressed the 1st and 3rd biases. It found no increased risk of invasive cervical cancer or carcinoma in situ with OC use. Studies of OC use and breast cancer have also had conflicting results, but the data clearly indicate that OC use does not increase the overall risk of breast cancer. In fact, OC benefits surpass breast cancer risks.
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  9. 9
    077765

    FDA gives final approval to Depo amid concerns over safety, cost and coercion.

    WASHINGTON MEMO. 1992 Nov 12; (17):2-3.

    In October 1992, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Depo-Provera for contraceptive use thus increasing the number of available contraceptives to women. Yet USAID has distributed it through its family planning programs in developing countries for many years. It has been available in the US since 1969 for noncontraceptive purposes such as endometrial cancer treatment. More than >30 million women around the world have used it to prevent conception. Today about 9 million women in 90 countries use it. A reason FDA did not approve Depo-Provera is that some studies revealed a link between it and breast tumors and cervical cancer in animals. More recent research conducted by WHO shows no connection with cervical cancer or ovarian cancer. In fact, it demonstrates Depo-Provera may protect against endometrial cancer. Yet it does indicate an insignificant increased risk of breast cancer in younger women. Some research suggests Depo-Provera may decrease bone density leading to osteoporosis and may increase the risk of having a low birth weight infant if the child is conceived before an injection. Evidence exists that it may lead to longer delays in becoming pregnant than other forms of contraception. Still 70% do conceive within 12 months after the last injection. Each Depo-Provera injection delivers a progestin in a water-based solution over 12 weeks resulting in suppressed ovulation. Its failure rate is <.5%/year, so Depo-Provera is one of the most effective reversible contraceptive available. The most common side effects are menstrual changes and weight gain (5-15 lbs.). Some contraindications include pregnancy, heart or liver disease, and breast cancer. As of November 1992, the FDA had not announced the cost or whether there would be a reduced price for family planning and public health clinics. Women's health and rights advocates plan on monitoring introduction of Depo-Provera to make sure that women have received comprehensive information and were not coerced to use it.
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  10. 10
    074521

    Update on Depo-Provera [editorial]

    Sapire KE

    SOUTH AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL. 1992 May 2; 81(9):444-5.

    The advantages and side effects of the injectable contraceptive, Depo-Provera, are highlighted. It has been available to women in South Africa and in about 90 developing and developed countries for 20 years. It is an effective and convenient contraceptive with no serious side effects. Its failure rate is 0.2-0.6/100 woman years. Nevertheless there is still concern that it may cause breast cancer because original tests of Depo-Provera using beagles indicated that it may increase breast cancer risk. WHO and the UK Committee on Safety of Medicines have since dropped the requirement of testing of beagles since they cannot predict the effects of steroids on women. A 12-year WHO multinational, hospital-based case-control study on neoplasia and hormonal contraceptives reassures Depo-Provera's safety. For example, the risk of breast cancer did not increase with duration or in women who had used it for >5 years. The risk was higher, however, among women who had used it for <4 years, particularly <35-year old women. The same holds true for oral contraceptive (OC) users. It has been suggested that this slight increase is because Depo-Provera and OCs may accelerate growth of some existing, previously undetected breast tumors. The WHO study verifies that the benefits of Depo-Provera surpass the side effects which include disturbed bleeding patterns, weight gain, and headaches. For example, it decreases the risk of ovarian and endometrial cancer. It is even more beneficial in developing countries where women often suffer from anemia because it increases hemoglobin levels. Further since women in developing countries cannot always comply and take their OCs, Depo-Provera can grant them the protection they need against pregnancy thus saving many lives. Depo-Provera should be available in developed as well as in developing countries.
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  11. 11
    067162
    Peer Reviewed

    The WHO Collaborative Study of Neoplasia and Steroid Contraceptives: the influence of combined oral contraceptives on risk of neoplasms in developing and developed countries.

    Thomas DB

    CONTRACEPTION. 1991 Jun; 43(6):695-710.

    A hospital-based case-control study was conducted in 8 developing and 3 developed countries to determine whether use of combined oral contraceptives (OCs) alters risks of various cancers. An observed trend of increasing risk of invasive cervical cancer with duration of use may not represent a causal relationship and is the subject of further study. Decreased risks of ovarian and endometrial carcinomas in users likely indicate a protective effect of OCs, the degree of which was similar in developing and developed countries. A small increase in risk of breast cancer in recent and current users was found to be somewhat greater in developing countries. Both causal and noncausal interpretations of this finding have been offered. No associations were found between OCs and in situ cervical, hepatocellular, cholangio, or gallbladder carcinomas, or uterine sarcomas. However, the ability of this study to detect alterations in risks for these neoplasms in longterm users was low. (author's)
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  12. 12
    038639
    Peer Reviewed

    Depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) and cancer: memorandum from a WHO meeting.

    Chutivongse S; Gray R; Hill C; Hulka B; Kenya P; Odlind V; Pardthaisong T; Petitti D; Rubin G; Shapiro S

    BULLETIN OF THE WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION. 1986; 64(3):375-82.

    This memorandum from a World Health Organization (WHO) meeting held in 1985 summarizes available epidemiologic data from human studies, including the WHO Collaborative Study of Neoplasia and Steroid Contraceptives, on the association between depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) use and neoplasia. The WHO Collaborative Study is collecting data on cases and controls from 14 collaborating centers in 11 countries. Analysis of preliminary findings regarding cancers of the endometrium, ovary, liver, and breast suggest that there is no increased risk in DMPA users. The relative risk estimates for these sites are 0.3 for endometrial cancer, 0.7 for ovarian cancer, 1.0 for liver cancer, and 1.0 for breast cancer. The issue of a causal association between DMPA use and cervical cancer is less clear. The adjusted relative risk for cervical cancer was a nonsignificant 1.2; however, somewhat higher risks were noted in subgroups of longterm (over 4 years) users. Although the WHO study is the 1st to provide reliable data on DMPA and neoplasia, its findings must be regarded as tentative. At this point the data are insufficient to assess the influence of DMPA on risk among longterm users or risk long after initial exposure.
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  13. 13
    033322

    Why menstruate?

    Short RV

    Healthright. 1985 Aug; 4(4):9-12.

    The pattern of reproductive activity displayed by early hunter-gatherer ancestors, before the dawn of civilization, must have been vastly different from today's pattern. In the absence of contraception such women would have spent the greater part of their reproductive lives either pregnant or in lactational amenorrhea. In developing these ideas further it was estimated that a hunter-gatherer woman would have spent about 15 years in lactational amenorrhea, whereas just under 4 years would have been occupied by her 5 pregnancies, and she would only have had about 4 years of menstrual cycles. The total number of menstrual cycles she would experience in her entire life would be no more than about 50. This is in marked contrast to the situation today in a typical Western woman using contraceptives and experiencing menarche at 13 and the menopause at 50. Allowing her 2 years' respite from cycles during her 2 pregnancies, each followed by only a token period of breastfeeding, this leaves 35 years during which she would experience about 420 menstrual cycles. The conclusion is that an excessive number of menstrual cycles is an iatrogenic disorder of communities practicing any form of contraception. Thus, it is important to note that even the condom or vasectomy have important repercussions on the female's reproductive cycle. Since 99.9% of human existence has been spent living a nomadic hunter-gatherer life, this high frequency of menstrual cycles is a new experience, one that humans may be genetically ill-adapted to cope with. In fact, there are a number of "diseases of nulliparity" whose incidence is markedly increased in women with few or no children and who are therefore experiencing an increased number of menstrual cycles. These diseases include carcinoma of the breast, endometrium and ovaries, and endometriosis. As part of the effort to develop contraceptives that promote a healthy state of fertility, it is necessary to ask the question, "is a period really necessary?" To learn if women women accept a contraceptive method that reduced the frequency of menstruation, a clinical trial of an oral contraceptive was conducted. The OC was administered in such a way as to produce a withdrawal bleed only once every 3 months. This was termed the tricycle pill regimen. 196 women attending a family planning clinic in Edinburgh, Scotland, volunteered to participate, although 89 of them subsequently withdrew from the trial for a variety of reasons before it was completed at the end of a year. Overall, 82% of the women positvely welcomed the reduction in the number of periods; 91% of the women who completed the trial even refused to revert to a standard monthly OC regimen thereafter. The findings were in complete contrast to the results of a World Health Organization survey of patterns and perceptions of menstruation. But the WHO sample was highly biased in favor of women having regular menstrual cycles, and hence quite unrepresentative of the population as a whole. In sum, even the most pessimistic estimate of the WHO's menstruation survey shows that a proportion of women in every country investigated were prepared to accept amenorhea as a by-product of contraception. Reversible amenorrhea might become an increasingly popular form of contraception, and it might also confer significant health benefits.
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  14. 14
    010601

    Depo-Provera debate revs up at FDA.

    Sun M

    Science. 1982 Jul 30; 217(4558):424-8.

    The record of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's (USFDA) actions regarding Depo-Provera, a medroxyprogesterone acetate, as an injectable contraceptive and the international implications are reviewed. In September 1982 a special panel of scientists began deliberations to recommend whether Depo-Provera should be approved for use as an injectable contraceptive. The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) has been asked by developing countries to furnish the drug but will not export drugs that are not approved by USFDA. More than 80 countries have approved the drug. Advocates for USFDA approval include the Upjohn Company (manufacturer of the drug), World Health Organization, International Planned Parenthood Federation, Population Crisis Committee, and the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology. The opposition includes the Health Research Group affiliated with Ralph Nader, the National Women's Health Network, and several right-to-life groups. Hesitation by USFDA is related to laboratory animal studies which suggest that Depo-Provera is a potential human carcinogen. Upjohn conducted a 7 year study with 16 beagles and a 10 year study with Rhesus monkeys; both of the test animals developed more tumors than the controls. Questions were raised about using the animals since the response of these two species to the drug and the human response are not necessarily comparable. Limited approval has been recommended twice by expert advisory committees in 1974 and 1975, but USFDA refused both times. It is suspected that Korea, Taiwan, Egypt, Jordan, and Yemen reversed their approval as a result of the latest USFDA rejection. This final decision will have major economic and social implications and will assume international importance.
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  15. 15
    800766

    Depo-Provera support widens.

    PEOPLE. 1980; 7(2):22.

    Recent studies have not turned up any negative findings on Depo Provera, the controversial injectable contraceptive which is currently banned in the U.S. 2 large studies, in the U.S. and England, found no increased risk of breast cancer in Depo Provera users. A 3rd study, in fact, found a decrease in the incidence of breast cancer in postmenopausal users of Depo Provera. Doubt has been cast on the earlier studies with female beagles which found breast cancer increased through association with Depo Provera. Further studies have also shown no increased risk of endometrial cancer in Depo Provera users. The International Federation for Family Health has issued a report advising the use of Depo Provera. It is an especially useful contraceptive for developing countries because 1 injection gives 3 months' protection and cannot be wrongly used.
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  16. 16
    796377

    International forum update: depot medroxyprogesterone acetate and endometrial carcinoma.

    McDaniel EB; Potts M

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF GYNAECOLOGY AND OBSTETRICS. 1979; 17(3):297-9.

    A report in Family Planning Perspectives (11:47, 1979) that 2 of 12 rhesus monkeys given 50 times the human dose of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) by body weight for 10 years had developed endometrial carcinoma (CA) instigated a retrospective survey of all hospital admissions for proven endometrial CA in 2 Thai provinces where DMPA contraceptive injections have been used since 1965. From 1974-78, 16 women were hospitalized with endometrial CA. None of the 9 women followed up had previously used injectable or oral contraceptives. The recorded incidence of endometrial CA has not increased in these provinces. The McCormick Hospital's Family Planning Department has administered 864,692 DMPA injections (150 mg. into the deltoid muscle every 12 weeks usually) to 86,511 acceptors for a total of 207,694 years usage. Over 300 women have used DMPA continuously for 10-13 years. This study concludes that the monkey dosage and incidence rates of CA do not apply to women taking normal dosage for long periods of time. DMPA should continue to be used and will be recommended to the Toxicology Review Panel of the World Health Organization's Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction.
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  17. 17
    796367
    Peer Reviewed

    [Oral contraceptives and the risk of cancer (author's transl)] P-piller och cancerrisk.

    Gustafsson JA; Hagenfeldt K

    LAKARTIDNINGEN. 1979 Apr 25; 76(17):1625-7.

    An overview of the risk of developing cancer related to oral contraceptive (o.c.) use is presented. A committee of experts affiliated with WHO studied the problem of developing cancer related to o.c. use. O.c. use for more than 2 years prevents the formation of benign breast tumors, even after discontinuing o.c. use. The effect is due to the progestin component. There is no clear indication that o.c. use increases the risk of breast cancer. A higher risk of endometrial cancer is associated with sequential preparation use, but not with the use of combination preparations. Cervical neoplasms and pituitary adenoma may be more frequent among predisposed women who use o.c.s. Studies show a reduced risk of ovarian cancer with o.c. use, but more studies are necessary. There is a marked increase in the relative risk of developing hepatocellular adenoma among women who use o.c.s for longer than 3 years. The risk increases with the hormone dosage, the duration of treatment, and the age of the patient. There is no reliable data to indicate that the risk of malignant melanoma increases with o.c. use. More study is needed to determine the possible cancer risks of injection preparations. Combination preparations can cause an increased risk of vaginal epithelial metaplasia. Diethylstilbestrol taken during early pregnancy can cause vaginal neoplasms in the offspring. More epidemiological studies and clinical and laboratory studies on the carcinogenic effects of o.c.s and the endocrinological effects of o.c.s on younger women should be undertaken. It is recommended that o.c.s with the lowest possible hormone dosages be used. O.c.s should not be prescribed to women with vaginal adenosis. (Summary in ENG)
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  18. 18
    012654

    Statement on injectable contraception.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]

    IPPF Medical Bulletin. 1982 Dec; 16(6):3-4.

    Injectable hormonal contraception with 2 longacting steroidal preparations--norethisterone enanthate (NET-EN) and depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA)--provides an effective means of fertility regulation and has become an important method of family planning. DMPA and NET-EN have several advantages which make them particularly appropriate for some women and acceptable in family planning programs. A single injection can provide highly effective contraception for 2 or more months, delivery is simple, independent of coitus, and ensures periodic contact with medical or other trained health personnel. Currently, DMPA is registered as a therapeutic agent in nearly all countries and as a contraceptive agent in over 80 developed and developing countries. NET-EN is registered as a contraceptive in 40 countries. Administered by intramuscular injection in an aqueous microcrystalline suspension, DMPA exerts its contraceptive effect primarily by suppression of ovulation, but its effects on the endometrium, the uterine tubes, and the production of cervical mucus may also play a role in reducing fertility. DMPA as a contraceptive agent is generally given at a dosage of 150 mg every 90 days. NET-EN when administered as an intramuscular injection of an oil preparation at a dose of 200 mg inhibits ovulation. It should be administered at 8 weekly intervals for the 1st 6 months of use, then at intervals of 8 or 12 weeks. Longterm animal studies with DMPA have been completed mainly on beagle bitches and rhesus monkeys, and similar studies with NET-EN are nearing completion. None of the findings in beagles is considered applicable to human populations because the beagle responds differently than humans to steroidal hormones. None of the deaths among rhesus monkeys was attributable to effects of the drug. Endometrial carcinoma was found in 2 of the replacement monkeys but the number of animals was too small for statistically significant studies, and it is not possible to conclude whether DMPA or NET-EN caused these cancers or instead failed to prevent them. Despite more than 18 years of use and an estimated 13 million women who have ever used DMPA or NET-EN, no case has been recorded of an endometrial malignancy in women so exposed. There is no evidence at this stage of a causal association, either anecdotal or scientific. No evidence of an increased risk of malignant and premalignant disease of the uterine cervix has been found in DMPA users. There is sufficient evidence from investigations in several countries that DMPA and NET-EN may increase both milk production and the duration of lactation. The only clinical metabolic effect attributed to DMPA is weight gain. NET-EN and DMPA are associated with disruption of the menstrual cycle and irregular bleeding.
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  19. 19
    013571

    Depot medroxyprogesterone acetate: a 1980 update.

    Maine D; Rosenfield A

    In: McDaniel EB, ed. Second Asian Regional Workshop on Injectable Contraceptives. Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, World Neighbors, 1982. 39-44.

    The best available data on the possible side effects of Depot Medroxyprogesterone Acetate (DMPA) are examined so that physicians and health officials can decide for themselves whether DMPA is appropriate for use in their countries. Several evaluations of the scientific evidence on the safety of DMPA have taken place in the last few years. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced in 1978 that it would not approve DMPA for use in the US. Subsequently, the World Health Organization's (WHO) Toxicology Review Panel conducted a review and found no reason to recommend that DMPA be withdrawn from use. In 1980 an Ad Hoc Consultative Panel presented its findings and recommendations to the US Agency for International Development (USAID). The Panel recommended that USAID make DMPA available to national family planning programs upon request. This recommendation was based on careful consideration of the medical and ethical issues involved by Panel members with expertise in the fields of obstetrics and gynecology, animal physiology and toxicology, epidemiology, pathology, law, and health policy. DMPA is currently approved for contraceptive use in more than 80 developed and developing countries. Each of the 6 reasons for FDA's denial of approval of DMPA are reviewed: studies using beagle dogs showed an increased incidence of mammary tumors associated with DMPA use; the availability of a number of alternative methods of contraception in the US and the lack of clear evidence that a significant patient population in need of DMPA exists in the US; the possibility that bleeding disturbances caused by the drug may lead to the administration of estrogen, thus decreasing the benefits of a progestogen only contraceptive; the possibility that exposure of fetuses to DMPA, if pregnancy occurs, poses a risk of congenital malformation; and reservations about the ability of the post marketing study for breast and cervical carcinoma. As a result of species differences in reactions to DMPA, the WHO Toxicology Review Panel, the Ad Hoc Panel, and the UK Commission on Safety of Medicines have stated that it is not possible to conclude from the beagle studies that DMPA poses any increased risk of breast cancer to women. The Ad Hoc Panel found little information on the effects of progestogen alone and concluded that the data fail to suggest that DMPA poses more of a threat of fetal malformation than do other hormonal contraceptives. Thorough discussion of menstrual changes with prospective DMPA users and supportive patient counseling are the best methods of dealing with concerns about irregular bleeding and amenorrhea. Regarding endometrial cancer, preliminary evidence suggests that progestogens may even protect against endometrial cancer.
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