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  1. 1
    060440

    Statement from the Consultation on AIDS and the Workplace, Geneva, 27-29 June 1988.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Global Programme on AIDS; World Health Organization [WHO]. Office of Occupational Health; International Labour Office [ILO]

    [Unpublished] 1988. [4] p. (WHO/GPA/INF/88.7)

    Government, trade union, business, and public health representatives from 18 countries met in Geneva in June 1988 to discuss risk factors associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in the workplace, the response of workers and management to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic, and the potential use of the workplace for health education activities. The emphasis was on occupational settings where there is no risk of transmittal of the HIV from worker to worker or worker to client. Protection of the human rights and dignity of HIV-infected workers should be the cornerstone of occupational policy on AIDS; workers with symptomatic HIV infection should be accorded the same treatment as any other worker with an illness. Pre-employment screening for HIV infection is discriminatory and should be prohibited. Employees should be under no obligation to inform their employer about their HIV status. Any information about seropositivity on the part of individual workers should be kept confidential by the employer to protect the employee from discrimination and social stigmatization. To create a climate of mutual understanding, unions and employers are urged to organize educational campaigns. HIV- infected individuals should be entitled to work as long as they are able, and efforts should be make to seek reasonable alternative working arrangements if feasible. Finally, HIV-infected persons should not be excluded from social security benefits and other occupationally related benefits. Overall, the AIDS crisis presents employers with an opportunity to improve working relationships in a way that enhances human rights and ensures freedom from discrimination.
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  2. 2
    121305

    Services for factory workers. Meeting the needs: St. Lucia.

    FORUM. 1996 Dec; 12(2):14.

    While the government of St. Lucia actively supports family planning and the Ministry of Health maintains a service delivery program, the Saint Lucia Planned Parenthood Association (SLPPA) is also involved in getting family planning messages and a variety of services to the public at minimal cost. The work schedules of factory workers in St. Lucia's manufacturing sector prohibit them from visiting family planning clinics, doctors' offices, and distribution posts to obtain contraceptives. SLPPA staff members therefore go to 12 selected factories to provide female employees with family planning information and contraceptive methods. 90% of employees at these factories are female. The outreach team of one nurse midwife, a counselor, and a trained factory distributor visit the factories twice each month during which they also teach women on sexual and reproductive health, responsible family life, and relationships. More than 2000 factory workers currently have access to SLPPA services. In 1996, more than 1000 workers had individual counseling sessions on sexual and reproductive health. The SLPPA also reaches women through other non-contraception initiatives such as the early detection of cervical and breast cancer.
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