Your search found 3 Results

  1. 1
    296295

    Emergency field handbook: a guide for UNICEF staff.

    UNICEF

    New York, New York, UNICEF, 2005 Jul. [420] p.

    Since its inception, UNICEF has provided life-saving assistance and assured protection for children in emergencies - both natural and man-made. Guiding UNICEF's response in humanitarian situations is the principle that children in the midst of natural disasters and armed conflict have the same needs and rights as children in stable situations. Emergencies have grown increasingly complex and their impact is especially devastating on the most vulnerable. In health and nutrition, water and sanitation, protection, education and HIV/AIDS, UNICEF's Core Commitments for Children in Emergencies are not merely a mission statement - they are a humanitarian imperative. UNICEF will keep these commitments and ensure a reliable, timely response in emergencies. The Core Commitments also provide a framework within which we work with our key national, United Nations and non-governmental partners to provide humanitarian assistance. This handbook has been developed as a practical tool for UNICEF field staff to meet the needs of children and women affected by disasters. It is the result of extensive consultation. We urge you to use it as an essential reference tool and to share it with our key partners. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    294423
    Peer Reviewed

    Primary health care in complex humanitarian emergencies: Rwanda and Kosovo experiences and their implications for public health training. [Soins de santé primaire dans le cadre d'urgences humanitaires complexes : les expériences du Rwanda et du Kosovo, et leurs implications dans le domaine de la formation en santé publique]

    Gardemann J

    Croatian Medical Journal. 2002; 43(2):148-155.

    In a complex humanitarian emergency, a catastrophic breakdown of political, economic, and social systems, often accompanied by violence, contributes to a long-lasting dependency of the affected communities on external service. Relief systems, such as the Emergency Response Units of the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, have served as a sound foundation for fieldwork in humanitarian emergencies. The experience in emergencies gained in Rwanda in 1994 and Kosovo in 1999 clearly points to the need for individual adjustments of therapeutic standards to preexisting morbidity and health care levels within the affected population. In complex emergencies, public health activities have been shown to promote peace, prevent violence, and reconcile enemies. A truly democratic and multiprofessional approach in all public health training for domestic or foreign service serves as good pattern for fieldwork. Beyond the technical and scientific skills required in the profession, political, ethical, and communicative competencies are critical in humanitarian assistance. Because of the manifold imperatives of further public health education for emergency assistance, a humanitarian assistance competence training center should be established. Competence training centers focus on the core competencies required to meet future needs, are client-oriented, connect regional and international networks, rely on their own system of quality control, and maintain a cooperative management of knowledge. Public health focusing on complex humanitarian emergencies will have to act in prevention not only of diseases and impairments but also of political tension and hatred. (author's)
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  3. 3
    277698
    Peer Reviewed

    Lessons learned from complex emergencies over past decade.

    Salama P; Spiegel P; Talley L; Waldman R

    Lancet. 2004; 364:1801-1813.

    Major advances have been made during the past decade in the way the international community responds to the health and nutrition consequences of complex emergencies. The public health and clinical response to diseases of acute epidemic potential has improved, especially in camps. Case-fatality rates for severely malnourished children have plummeted because of better protocols and products. Renewed focus is required on the major causes of death in conflict-affected societies—particularly acute respiratory infections, diarrhoea, malaria, measles, neonatal causes, and malnutrition—outside camps and often across regions and even political boundaries. In emergencies in sub- Saharan Africa, particularly southern Africa, HIV/AIDS is also an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Stronger coordination, increased accountability, and a more strategic positioning of non-governmental organisations and UN agencies are crucial to achieving lower maternal and child morbidity and mortality rates in complex emergencies and therefore for reaching the UN’s Millennium Development Goals. (author's)
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