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Your search found 3 Results

  1. 1
    345013

    Essential medicines for mothers and children: a key element of health systems. Access to medicines and public pharmaceutical policy.

    Joncheere K

    Entre Nous. 2009; (68):14-15.

    Medicines, when used appropriately, are one of the most cost effective interventions in health care. European countries spend an important part of their health budget on medicines, from 12% on average for the EU countries to more than 30% for the Newly Independent States (NIS) countries. Whereas in EU countries the larger part of the medicines expenditures are publicly funded through taxes and/or social health insurance, in the NIS and in the south eastern European countries it is often the patients who have to pay directly for the drugs themselves. This means that many patients simply do not get the drugs they need because they cannot afford them, and also may force families to incur enormous expenses as they sell their belongings in order to pay for their drugs and their health care.
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  2. 2
    342775
    Peer Reviewed

    Keeping evidence-based recommendations up to date: the World Health Organization's global guidance for family planning.

    Curtis KM; Peterson HB; d'Arcangues C

    Contraception. 2009 Oct; 80(4):323-4.

    This editorial explains the different tools that the World Health Organization's (WHO) Department of Reproductive Health and Research in collaboration with international partners have been creating and updating as global guidance for family planning. It discusses that the tools are based on the best scientific evidence and stresses the importance of updating the recommendations in the tools.
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  3. 3
    342377
    Peer Reviewed

    Improving control of African schistosomiasis: towards effective use of rapid diagnostic tests within an appropriate disease surveillance model.

    Stothard JR

    Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 2009 Apr; 103(4):325-32.

    Contemporary control of schistosomiasis is typically reliant upon large-scale administration of praziquantel (PZQ) to school age children. Whilst PZQ treatment of each child is inexpensive, the direct and indirect costs of preventive chemotherapy for the whole school population are more substantive and, at the national level where many schools are targeted, maximising cost effectiveness and the health impact are essential requirements for ensuring longer-term sustainability (i.e. >5 years). To this end, the WHO has issued a set of treatment guidelines, inclusive of re-treatment schedules, such that, where possible, treatment decisions by school are based upon local disease prevalence as determined by parasitological and/or questionnaire methods. As each diagnostic method has known shortcomings, presumptive treatment of at-risk schools may initially be preferred, especially if the existing infrastructure for disease surveillance is poor. It is against this background of school-based preventive chemotherapy that a rapid diagnostic test (RDT) for schistosomiasis is most urgently needed, not only to improve initial disease surveillance but also to focus drug delivery better through time. In this paper, the development, evaluation and application of selected diagnostic tests are reviewed to identify barriers that impede progress, foremost of which is that a new disease surveillance and evaluation model is required where the in-country price of each RDT ideally needs to be less than US$1 to be cost effective both in the short- and long-term perspective.
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