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  1. 1
    335234

    The global partnership for development: A review of MDG 8 and proposals for the post-2015 development agenda.

    Kenny C; Dykstra S

    Washington, D.C., Center for Global Development, 2013 Jul. [49] p. (CGD Policy Paper No. 026)

    The eighth Millennium Development Goal (MDG 8) covered a ‘global partnership for development’ in areas including aid, trade, debt relief, drugs and ICTs. We have seen progress as well as gaps in the areas which were covered: more aid, but with quality lagging and a link to progress in MDG areas that was weak; a better rich world performance on tariffs but one that misses increasingly important parts of trade; broadly successful debt relief but an agenda on the support for private investment left uncovered; mixed progress on drugs access and absence of a broader global public health agenda; and a global ICT revolution with weak links to the MDGs or a global partnership. Migration, non-ICT technologies, the global environment, and global institutional issues were all completely unaddressed in MDG 8. Looking forward, by 2030, a global compact on development progress linking OECD DAC aid and policy reform to low income countries as target beneficiaries (the implicit model of MDG 8) would be irrelevant to three quarters of the world. Half of the rich world will be in non-DAC countries and the share of aid in global transfers will continue to shrink. Global public goods provision will increasingly require the active participation of (at least) the G20 nations. A post-2015 global partnership agenda should involve a mixed approach to compact and partnership issues: binding ‘global compact’ targets under specific post-2015 sectoral goals focused on the role for aid alongside a standalone global public goods goal with time bound, numerical targets covering trade, investment, migration, technology, the environment and global institutions.
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  2. 2
    334472

    Promoting access to medical technologies and innovation. Intersections between public health, intellectual property and trade.

    Bartels HG; Beyer P; Kampf R; Krattiger A; Mirza Z; Taubman A; Watal J

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2012. [253] p.

    Medical technologies -- medicines, vaccines and medical devices -- are essential for public health. Access to essential medicines and the lack of research to address neglected diseases have been a major concern for many years. More recently, the focus of health policy debate has broadened to consider how to promote innovation and how to ensure equitable access to all vital medical technologies. Today’s health policy-makers need a clear understanding both of the innovation processes that lead to new technologies and of the ways in which these technologies are disseminated in health systems. This study captures a broad range of experience and data in dealing with the interplay between intellectual property, trade rules and the dynamics of access to, and innovation in, medical technologies. The study is intended to inform ongoing technical cooperation activities undertaken by the three organizations (World Trade Organization, World Intellectual Property Organization and World Health Organization) and to support policy discussions. Based on many years of field experience in technical cooperation, the study has been prepared to serve the needs of policymakers who seek a comprehensive presentation of the full range of issues, as well as lawmakers, government officials, delegates to international organizations, non-governmental organizations and researchers.
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  3. 3
    333309

    Millennium Development Goal 8, The Global Partnership for Development: Time to deliver. MDG Gap Task Force Report 2011.

    United Nations. MDG Gap Task Force

    New York, New York, United Nations, 2011. [98] p.

    The objective of MDG 8 is to assist all developing countries in achieving the goals through a strengthened global partnership for international development cooperation. The present report describes how that partnership is producing significant results on many fronts, but notes that many important gaps between expectations and delivery remain. (Excerpt)
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  4. 4
    079527

    WHO Expert Committee on Specifications for Pharmaceutical Preparations. Thirty-second report.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Expert Committee on Specifications for Pharmaceutical Preparations

    WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION TECHNICAL REPORT SERIES. 1992; (823):i-vi, 1-134.

    The WHO Expert Committee on Specifications for Pharmaceutical Preparations reports that several national and regional drug regulatory authorities have adopted guidelines for good manufacturing practices for drugs similar to those recommended by the Committee. Annex 1 discusses these practices and makes up most of the Committee's 32nd report. The report also presents provisional guidelines on inspection of pharmaceutical manufacturers. It reviews the WHO Certification Scheme on the Quality of Pharmaceutical Products Moving in International Commerce. The Committee-endorsed scheme depends on a more effective exchange of information to more rigorously control all international trade of pharmaceuticals. Chapter 6 looks at the international pharmacopoeia and related activities, including quality specifications for drug substances and dosage forms, validation of analytical procedures, a simple test methodology, national laboratories for drug surveillance and control, and quality control of products derived from medicinal plants. The report discusses and lists the International Chemical Reference Substances and International Infrared Reference Spectra. it also addresses stability of dosage forms and extemporaneous preparations. Annex 4 presents guidelines to guarantee the quality of pharmaceutical and biological drugs prepared by recombinant DNA technology. Another annex looks at validation of analytical procedures used to examine pharmaceutical materials. The last annex discusses the protocol for a proposed study on the quality of some drugs at the point of use in developing countries. WHO has already asked Benin, Guinea, Mozambique, Uganda, and Tanzania in Africa, Bangladesh and Myanmar in Asia, and Guatemala and Peru in the Americas to participate.
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  5. 5
    061213

    Health research: essential link to equity in development.

    Commission on Health Research for Development

    Oxford, England, Oxford University Press, 1990. xix, 136 p.

    The Commission on Health Research for Development is an independent international consortium formed in 1987 to improve the health of people in developing countries by the power of research. This book is the result of 2 years of effort: 19 commissioned papers, 8 expert meetings, 8 regional workshops, case studies of health research activities in 10 developing countries and hundreds of individual discussions. A unique global survey examined financing, locations and promotion of health research. The focus of all this work was the influence of health on development. This book has 3 sections: a review of global health inequities and why health research is needed; findings of country surveys, health research financing, selection of topics and promotion; conclusions and recommendations. Some research priorities are contraception and reproductive health, behavioral health in developing countries, applied research on essential drugs, vitamin A deficiency, substance abuse, tuberculosis. The main recommendations are: that all countries begin essential national health research (ENHR), with international partnership; that larger and sustained international funding for research be mobilized; and that larger and sustained international funding for research be mobilized; and that international mechanisms for monitoring progress be established. The book is full of graphs and contains footnotes, a complete bibliography and an index.
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