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Your search found 7 Results

  1. 1
    392915
    Peer Reviewed

    Prescription drug use during pregnancy in Southern Tigray region, North Ethiopia.

    Molla F; Assen A; Abrha S; Masresha B; Gashaw A; Wondimu A; Belete Y; Melkam W

    BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth. 2017 Jun 5; 17(1):170.

    BACKGROUND: Judicious utilization of drugs rescues the fetus from the harmful effects while treating the health problems of the pregnant women. This study aimed at evaluating drug utilization pattern and its associated factors among pregnant women in Southern Tigray, Ethiopia. METHOD: Institution based cross-sectional study was conducted among 647 pregnant women who had been attending obstetrics-gynecology and antenatal care units in different health facilities of Southern Tigray region. The study participants were selected using multistage sampling technique. Data collection was done using pre-tested semi-structured questionnaires and by reviewing antenatal follow-up cards. Descriptive and inferential statistics were analyzed, to assess drug utilization pattern and its associated factors among pregnant women, using SPSS version 20 software. RESULTS: Of 647 pregnant women, 87.5% were prescribed with at least one medication. As per the United States Food and Drug Administration (US-FDA) risk classification system, 87.7, 7.9, 3.9, and 0.5% of the prescribed drug were from category A, B, C and D, respectively. Prescription drug use was more likely among gynecology ward visitors [AOR = 8.97, 95% Cl (2.69-29.88)] and among those who visited health facilities for the first time during their first [AOR =2.65, 95% Cl (1.44-4.84)] and second [AOR = 2.50, 95% Cl (1.36-4.61)] trimesters. CONCLUSION: Majority of the study population used safe and appropriate medications according to US-FDA risk classification system, with the exception of low proportion (0.5%) of medication with potential risk for the fetus. The average number of drug prescribed per pregnant women was in the recommended range of WHO drug use indicators guideline.
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  2. 2
    391126
    Peer Reviewed

    Shortages of benzathine penicillin for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of syphilis: An evaluation from multi-country surveys and stakeholder interviews.

    Nurse-Findlay S; Taylor MM; Savage M; Mello MB; Saliyou S; Lavayen M; Seghers F; Campbell ML; Birgirimana F; Ouedraogo L; Newman Owiredu M; Kidula N; Pyne-Mercier L

    PLoS Medicine. 2017 Dec; 14(12):e1002473.

    BACKGROUND: Benzathine penicillin G (BPG) is the only recommended treatment to prevent mother-to-child transmission of syphilis. Due to recent reports of country-level shortages of BPG, an evaluation was undertaken to quantify countries that have experienced shortages in the past 2 years and to describe factors contributing to these shortages. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Country-level data about BPG shortages were collected using 3 survey approaches. First, a survey designed by the WHO Department of Reproductive Health and Research was distributed to 41 countries and territories in the Americas and 41 more in Africa. Second, WHO conducted an email survey of 28 US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention country directors. An additional 13 countries were in contact with WHO for related congenital syphilis prevention activities and also reported on BPG shortages. Third, the Clinton Health Access Initiative (CHAI) collected data from 14 countries (where it has active operations) to understand the extent of stock-outs, in-country purchasing, usage behavior, and breadth of available purchasing options to identify stock-outs worldwide. CHAI also conducted in-person interviews in the same 14 countries to understand the extent of stock-outs, in-country purchasing and usage behavior, and available purchasing options. CHAI also completed a desk review of 10 additional high-income countries, which were also included. BPG shortages were attributable to shortfalls in supply, demand, and procurement in the countries assessed. This assessment should not be considered globally representative as countries not surveyed may also have experienced BPG shortages. Country contacts may not have been aware of BPG shortages when surveyed or may have underreported medication substitutions due to desirability bias. Funding for the purchase of BPG by countries was not evaluated. In all, 114 countries and territories were approached to provide information on BPG shortages occurring during 2014-2016. Of unique countries and territories, 95 (83%) responded or had information evaluable from public records. Of these 95 countries and territories, 39 (41%) reported a BPG shortage, and 56 (59%) reported no BPG shortage; 10 (12%) countries with and without BPG shortages reported use of antibiotic alternatives to BPG for treatment of maternal syphilis. Market exits, inflexible production cycles, and minimum order quantities affect BPG supply. On the demand side, inaccurate forecasts and sole sourcing lead to under-procurement. Clinicians may also incorrectly prescribe BPG substitutes due to misperceptions of quality or of the likelihood of adverse outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Targets for improvement include drug forecasting and procurement, and addressing provider reluctance to use BPG. Opportunities to improve global supply, demand, and use of BPG should be prioritized alongside congenital syphilis elimination efforts.
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  3. 3
    331506

    How to be reasonably sure a client is not pregnant. [Checklist].

    Family Health International [FHI]

    Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, FHI, 2008. [2] p.

    In order to help nonmenstruating clients safely initiate their method of choice, Family Health International (FHI) developed a simple checklist for use by family planning providers. Although originally the Pregnancy Checklist was developed for use by family planning providers, it can also be used by other health care providers who need to determine whether a client is not pregnant. For example, pharmacists may use this checklist when prescribing certain medications that should be avoided during pregnancy (e.g., certain antibiotics or anti-seizure drugs). The checklist is endorsed by the World Health Organization (WHO) and is based on criteria established by WHO for determining with reasonable certainty that a woman is not pregnant. Evaluation of the checklist in family planning clinics has demonstrated that the tool is very effective in correctly identifying women who are not pregnant. Furthermore, recent studies in Guatemala, Mali, and Senegal have shown that use of the checklist by family planning providers significantly reduced the proportion of clients being turned away due to menstrual status and improved women's access to contraceptive services.
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  4. 4
    322663
    Peer Reviewed

    Inferiority of single-dose sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine intermittent preventive therapy for malaria during pregnancy among HIV-positive Zambian women.

    Gill CJ; MacLeod WB; Mwanakasale V; Chalwe V; Mwananyanda L

    Journal of Infectious Diseases. 2007 Dec 1; 196(11):1577-1584.

    The World Health Organization advocates 2-3 doses of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) for intermittent preventive treatment of malaria (SP IPTp). The optimal number of doses and the consequences of singledose therapy remain unclear. Data were from a randomized, controlled study of human immunodeficiency virus-positive Zambian women comparing monthly versus 2-dose SP IPTp. We compared maternal and neonatal birth outcomes as a function of how many doses the mothers received (1 to >/= 4 doses). Of 387 deliveries, 34 received 1 dose of SP. Single-dose SP was significantly associated with higher proportions of maternal anemia, peripheral and cord blood parasitemia, infant prematurity, and low birth weight. SP conferred dose-dependent benefits, particularly in the transition from 1 to 2 doses of SP. Women randomized to the standard 2-dose regimen were much more likely to receive only 1 dose than were women randomized to monthly IPT (relative risk, 16.4 [95% confidence interval, 4.0-68.3]). Single-dose SP was a common result of trying to implement the standard 2-dose regimen and was inferior to all other dosing regimens. At a programmatic level, this implies that monthly SP IPTp may ultimately be more effective than the standard regimen by reducing the risk of inadvertently underdosing mothers. (author's)
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  5. 5
    190440
    Peer Reviewed

    Use of intermittent presumptive treatment and insecticide treated bed nets by pregnant women in four Kenyan districts.

    Guyatt HL; Noor AM; Ochola SA; Snow RW

    Tropical Medicine and International Health. 2004 Feb; 9(2):255-261.

    The roll back malaria (RBM) movement promotes the use of insecticide-treated bednets (ITNs) and intermittent presumptive treatment (IPT) of malaria infection as preventive measures against the adverse effects of malaria among pregnant women in Africa. To determine the use of these preventive measures we undertook a community-based survey of recently pregnant women randomly selected from communities in four districts of Kenya in December 2001. Of the 1814 women surveyed, only 5% had slept under an ITN. More than half of the 13% of women using a bednet (treated or untreated) had bought their nets from shops or markets. Women from rural areas used bednets less than urban women (11% vs. 27%; P < 0.001), and 41% of the bednets used by rural women had been obtained free of charge from a research project in Bondo or a nationwide UNICEF donation through antenatal clinics (ANCs). Despite 96% of ANC providers being aware of IPT with sulphadoxine–pyrimethamine (SP), only 5% of women interviewed had received two or more doses of SP as a presumptive treatment. The coverage of pregnant women with at least one dose of IPT with SP was 14%, though a similar percentage also had received at least a single dose as a curative treatment. The coverage of nationally recommended strategies to prevent malaria during pregnancy during 2001 was low across the diverse malaria ecology of Kenya. Rapid expansion of access to these services is required to meet international and national targets by the year 2005. The scaling up of malaria prevention programmes through ANC services should be possible with 74% of women visiting ANCs at least twice in all four districts. Issues of commodity supply and service costs to clients will be the greatest impediments to reaching RBM targets. (author's)
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  6. 6
    184706

    The Africa malaria report 2003.

    World Health Organization [WHO]; UNICEF

    [Geneva, Switzerland], WHO, 2003. 69, [43] p. (WHO/CDS/MAL/2003.1093)

    This report is an initial effort to collect, analyse, and present information on the malaria situation. The report focuses on Africa and specifically on those African countries with the highest burden of the disease. These countries bear more than 90% of the global malaria burden. Emphasis is also given to the technical strategies for malaria control established by the Roll Back Malaria Partnership and the targets set at the Abuja Summit. In addition, with due regard to the importance of understanding the resource requirements of malaria control, a chapter on resource mobilization and financing is included. The data contained in this report have been drawn from a variety of sources in order to provide the most complete picture of the malaria situation in Africa. The UNICEF Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys and the and Health Surveys, in particular, are national surveys that represent a major advance in collection of baseline data to provide benchmarks against which progress can be measured. It is fully expected that the recent consensus on core data needs, well coordinated efforts to collect data, and progress in solving methodological and other data collection problems will together fulfil the new demands for malaria information. (excerpt)
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  7. 7
    143366

    Effect of zidovudine on perinatal HIV-1 transmission and maternal viral load [letter]

    Golden B; Cooper E; Cundall D; Moy R

    Lancet. 1999 Jul 10; 354(9173):158-9.

    The International Child Health Group of the Royal College of Pediatrics and Child Health is displeased with the UNAIDS, UNICEF, and WHO policy statement endorsing the artificial feeding of infants. The statement holds that with nutritionally adequate breast milk substitutes safely prepared and fed to the infants of mothers with HIV infection, the infants are at less risk of morbidity and mortality than if they were breast-fed. This global policy has more potential to harm than help, for women in extremely poor and unsuitable settings may wrongly decide to adopt bottlefeeding. The better strategy is to promote exclusive breast-feeding for 4-6 months. Efforts should also be made to reduce the vertical transmission of HIV by increasing the use of short-course zidovudine wherever feasible. Further efforts should be made to address the factors which contribute to HIV infection and prevent social and economic development.
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