Important: The POPLINE website will retire on September 1, 2019. Click here to read about the transition.

Your search found 2 Results

  1. 1
    322021

    Handbook of supply management at first-level health care facilities. 1st version for country adaptation.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2006. 73 p. (WHO/HIV/2006.03)

    All first-level health care facilities, namely primary health care clinics and outpatient departments based in district hospitals, use medicines and related supplies. It takes a team effort to manage these supplies, involving all health care facility staff: doctors, nurses, health workers and storekeepers. This is especially true in small facilities with only one or two health workers. Each staff member should know how to manage all supplies at the health care facility correctly. Each staff member has an important role. The Handbook of Supply Management at First-Level Health Care Facilities describes all major medicines and supply management tasks, known as the standard procedures of medicines supply management at first-level health care facilities. Each chapter covers one major task, explains how the task fits into the process of maintaining a consistent supply of medicines, and recommends which standard procedures to use. Annexes at the back of the handbook contain various checklists and examples of forms which can be introduced as needed at your health care facility. This handbook is part of a package used in an integrated training and capacity-building course targeted at first-level health care facilities. It can be used in conjunction with the existing Integrated Management of Adult and Adolescent Illness (IMAI) strategy developed by WHO. It can also be used for basic training activities independent of IMAI training courses. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    070608

    Analysis of health services expenditures in the Gambia: 1981-1991.

    Barth L; Makinen M

    Arlington, Virginia, John Snow, Inc. [JSI], Resources for Child Health Project [REACH], 1986 Jun. [3], 31, [11] p. (USAID Contract No. DPE-5927-C-00-5068-00)

    In the mid 1980s, the Government of The Gambia (GOTG) sought funds from the World Bank and other donors to restructure and strengthen its health system. Since the World Bank thought that recurrent cost obligations that the GOTG would find unacceptable should accompany the implementation of the National Health Project (NHP), this study was undertaken. The Italian Government agreed to fund US $9.8 million to NHP, most of the funds going to renovating and refurbishing the pediatric ward and central laboratory at Royal Victoria Hospital in Banjul. Trends in health sector expenditures showed that the devaluation of the dalasi continued to bring about shortfalls in nonsalary costs, especially in drugs and dressings. Therefore the GOTG must address the shortfalls before even considering expansion of the already inefficient health delivery system. It also needs to develop a cost recovery system for drugs which maintains a reliable source and adequate supplies of drugs in the proper amounts, effectively distributes the drugs, and manages the finances effectively. The GOTG should also develop the Ministry of Health's ability to coordinate donor support and to develop a process of budgeting, spending, and planning. The study team also recommended consolidating staff rather than expand staff in light of financial constraints. A flotation policy and exchange rates less favorable to the dalasi may grant the GOTG more access to exchange within the banking system.
    Add to my documents.