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  1. 1
    192086

    A guide for patients, family members and community caregivers. Caregiver booklet.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Integrated Management of Adolescent and Adult Illness [IMAI]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, [2003]. 47 p.

    The Caregiver Booklet is designed to help patients, family members, and community caregivers in the home-based care of serious long term illness. Home care is best for many people with long term illnesses, including those who are close to the end of life. All patients being cared for at home should be first assessed and treated by a health worker, who will help caregivers provide high quality home care and ensure that medicines are taken correctly. This booklet explains how to: 1. Deal with specific symptoms. 2. Provide care for terminal and bedridden patients at home. 3. Decide when to seek help from a health facility. The booklet should be given to the patient or caregiver and its contents explained by a nurse or community worker. The first section of the booklet covers ways to prevent problems from occuring and should be followed in all patients. The second section explains how to treat specific symptoms that may occur. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    192089

    Palliative care: symptom management and end-of-life care. Interim guidelines for first-level facility health workers.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Integrated Management of Adolescent and Adult Illness [IMAI]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2003 Dec. 50 p. (Integrated Management of Adolescent and Adult Illness [IMAI] No. 4; WHO/CDS/IMAI/2004.4)

    Palliative care includes symptom management during both acute and chronic illness and end-of-life (terminal) care. This module provides guidelines to prepare health workers to provide palliative care treatment and advice in clinic and to back up community caregivers and family members who need to provide home-based palliative care. For each symptom, the guidelines for the health worker include both a summary of non-pharmaceutical recommendations for home care and the clinical management and medications which the health worker might also provide, based on a limited essential drug list on the last page of this module. Alternative or additional drugs can be added during country adaptation. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    189406
    Peer Reviewed

    The untapped potential of palliative care for AIDS.

    Lancet. 2003 Nov 29; 362(9398):1773.

    December 1 is the 16th World AIDS Day. The major theme of the past year has been on strengthening the campaign for cheap antiretroviral drugs. This thrust, some critics maintain, has been to the detriment of HIV prevention efforts. Perhaps the most ambitious HIV/AIDS development in the past year has been WHO’s focus on the “3 by 5” target—a commitment to provide antiretroviral drugs to 3 million people in developing countries by the end of 2005. For many the “3 by 5” initiative, if successfully implemented, will bring a longer life. But how useful is this and other antiretroviral-based initiatives to those people with AIDS in the developing world who will die today, tomorrow, or in the very near future? For these people, the stark reality is that it is too late for antiretroviral treatment; what they need, yet rarely receive, is palliative care. (excerpt)
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