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  1. 1
    322021

    Handbook of supply management at first-level health care facilities. 1st version for country adaptation.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2006. 73 p. (WHO/HIV/2006.03)

    All first-level health care facilities, namely primary health care clinics and outpatient departments based in district hospitals, use medicines and related supplies. It takes a team effort to manage these supplies, involving all health care facility staff: doctors, nurses, health workers and storekeepers. This is especially true in small facilities with only one or two health workers. Each staff member should know how to manage all supplies at the health care facility correctly. Each staff member has an important role. The Handbook of Supply Management at First-Level Health Care Facilities describes all major medicines and supply management tasks, known as the standard procedures of medicines supply management at first-level health care facilities. Each chapter covers one major task, explains how the task fits into the process of maintaining a consistent supply of medicines, and recommends which standard procedures to use. Annexes at the back of the handbook contain various checklists and examples of forms which can be introduced as needed at your health care facility. This handbook is part of a package used in an integrated training and capacity-building course targeted at first-level health care facilities. It can be used in conjunction with the existing Integrated Management of Adult and Adolescent Illness (IMAI) strategy developed by WHO. It can also be used for basic training activities independent of IMAI training courses. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    303019

    Towards the creation of strategic partnerships: improving access to drugs for HIV / AIDS. Report of a consultative meeting, 30 June - 2 July 1997, Salle C, WHO, Geneva.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 1998. 20 p. (UNAIDS Best Practice Collection. Key Material; UNAIDS/98.40)

    From January 1996, the UNAIDS Secretariat has been in consultation with key players in the pharmaceutical industry, NGOs, people living with HIV, UN, major bilateral donors, country representatives and National AIDS Programme Managers on issues relating to access to drugs for HIV/AIDS. This meeting, held on 30 June to 2 July 1997, was the climax of this consultative process. The meeting brought together people living with HIV/AIDS, NGO representatives, National AIDS Programme Managers and UN representatives. With a modified version of the Search Conference approach, the following questions were raised: What are the current and future issues on access to drugs for HIV/AIDS at country and global levels? What partnerships should be created at country level to address these issues? What should be the content of these partnerships at country level? What should the UN do at global and country level to support these partnerships? To foster regional exchange of experience as well as enhance regional specificity, participants were assigned groups on a regional basis. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    289132

    Access to HIV / AIDS drugs and diagnostics of acceptable quality. Procurement Quality and Sourcing project. Manufacturers and suppliers whose HIV-related medicines have been found acceptable, in principle, for procurement by UN agencies. 18th ed.

    World Health Organization [WHO]; UNICEF; Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]; United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2004 Aug 9. 19 p.

    A "Procurement, Quality and Sourcing Project: Access to HIV/AIDS drugs and diagnostics of acceptable quality" was actively started by WHO in collaboration with other United Nations Organizations (UNAIDS, UNICEF, and UNFPA) in March 2001. The World Bank supports this initiative. The background to the project is described in the project description. The procedure for assessing the acceptability in principle of HIV/AIDS drugs comprises various components including 1) The evaluation of product data and information provided by manufacturers and suppliers, and 2) Inspection of manufacturing sites. Due to the particular properties of several substances used in some pharmaceutical finished dosage forms in the treatment of HIV/AIDS (e.g. chiral activity, isomerism, sensitivity to relative humidity etc.), and the current status where there are no Pharmacopoeia monographs and standards available for several substances and finished products, WHO appointed experts have performed a comprehensive and rigorous evaluation of the products included in the list, with a view to establishing their compliance with international standards. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    192346

    Sources and prices of selected medicines and diagnostics for people living with HIV / AIDS.

    UNICEF; Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]; Medecins Sans Frontieres. Campaign for Access to Essential Medicines

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2003 Jun. [88] p.

    This report sets out to provide market information that can be used to help procurement agencies make informed decisions on the source of medicines and serve as the basis for negotiating affordable prices. The aim is to help increase access to medicines for people living with HIV/ AIDS in developing countries. The data provided by the manufacturers serves to highlight the multiplicity of suppliers and the variation in price of some essential HIV/AIDS-related medicines on the international market. Without this information, there is a risk that low-income countries may be paying more than needed to obtain essential medicines. Price variations are highlighted through the tables and graphs included. Provision of price information addresses only one barrier to access to medicines in countries with limited resources and, it is appreciated that many other factors will affect the availability of medicines. Some of the other issues that must be considered in relation to the purchase of medicines for HIV/AIDS and related conditions are health infrastructure, human resources, and supply and distribution systems. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    189406
    Peer Reviewed

    The untapped potential of palliative care for AIDS.

    Lancet. 2003 Nov 29; 362(9398):1773.

    December 1 is the 16th World AIDS Day. The major theme of the past year has been on strengthening the campaign for cheap antiretroviral drugs. This thrust, some critics maintain, has been to the detriment of HIV prevention efforts. Perhaps the most ambitious HIV/AIDS development in the past year has been WHO’s focus on the “3 by 5” target—a commitment to provide antiretroviral drugs to 3 million people in developing countries by the end of 2005. For many the “3 by 5” initiative, if successfully implemented, will bring a longer life. But how useful is this and other antiretroviral-based initiatives to those people with AIDS in the developing world who will die today, tomorrow, or in the very near future? For these people, the stark reality is that it is too late for antiretroviral treatment; what they need, yet rarely receive, is palliative care. (excerpt)
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