Your search found 11 Results

  1. 1
    224545

    1993 demographic yearbook. 45th. 1993 annuaire demographique.

    United Nations. Department for Economic and Social Information and Policy Analysis. Statistical Division

    New York, New York, United Nations. Department for Economic and Social Information and Policy Analysis. Statistical Division, 1995. x, 1,032 p. (No. ST/ESA/STAT/SER.R/24)

    This is a comprehensive collection of international demographic statistics published annually by the United Nations. "The tables in this issue of the Yearbook are presented in two parts, the basic tables followed by the tables devoted to population censuses, the special topic in this issue. The first part contains tables giving a world summary of basic demographic statistics, followed by tables presenting statistics on the size, distribution and trends in population, natality, foetal mortality, infant and maternal mortality, general mortality, nuptiality and divorce. In the second part, this issue of the Yearbook serves to update the census information featured in the 1988 issue. Census data on demographic and social characteristics include population by single years of age and sex, national and/or ethnic composition, language and religion. Tables showing data on geographical characteristics include information on major civil divisions and localities by size-class. Educational characteristics include population data on literacy, educational attainment and school attendance. In many of the tables, data are shown by urban/rural residence."
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  2. 2
    087730

    Convention on Consent to Marriage [Minimum Age for Marriage and Registration of Marriages]. Status.

    United Nations

    In: Multilateral treaties, index and current status, Tenth Cumulative Supplement, compiled by M.J. Bowman and D.J. Harris. Nottingham, England, University of Nottingham Treaty Centre, 1993. 199.

    On 1 July 1992, Jordan became a party to this Convention. In addition, on 8 October 1991, Croatia succeeded to the Convention. The Convention reaffirms the consensual nature of marriages and requires the parties to establish a minimum age by law and to ensure the registration of marriages. The following countries became parties or succeeded to the Convention on the Nationality of Married Women in 1991-92: a) Croatia, 8 October 1991 (suc.); b) Jordan, 1 July 1992; c) Latvia, 14 April 1992; and d) Slovenia, 25 June 1991 (suc.). The Convention provides for the retention of nationality by women upon marriage or dissolution of marriage or when their husbands change their nationality. It also contains provisions on the naturalization of foreign wives. See Multilateral Treaties, Index and Current Status, 10th Cumulative Suppl., 1993, p. 181.
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  3. 3
    086758

    Convention on Consent to Marriage, [Minimum Age for Marriage and Registration of Marriage Status].

    United Nations

    In: Multilateral treaties, index and current status, Ninth Cumulative Supplement, compiled by M.J. Bowman and D.J. Harris. Nottingham, England, University of Nottingham Treaty Centre, 1992. 170.

    On 6 June 1991 Mongolia became a party to the Convention on Consent to Marriage, Minimum Age for Marriages and Registration of Marriages. The Convention reaffirms the consensual nature of marriages and requires the parties to establish a minimum age by law and to ensure the registration of marriages. On 14 October 1991, Saint Lucia succeeded to the Convention on the Nationality of Married Women. See Multilateral Treaties, Index and Current Status, p. 155. This Convention provides for the retention of nationality by women upon marriage or dissolution of marriage or when their husband changes his nationality. It also contains provisions on the naturalization of foreign wives.
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  4. 4
    131300

    1994 demographic yearbook. 46th ed. 1994 annuaire demographique. 46me ed.

    United Nations. Department for Economic and Social Information and Policy Analysis

    New York, New York, United Nations, 1996. x, 1131 p. (ST/ESA/STAT/SER.R/25)

    The Demographic Yearbook for 1994 presents comprehensive statistical tables of demography encompassing: population, vital statistics, infant mortality, maternal mortality, mortality, natality, nuptiality, divorce, and economic characteristics for 233 countries throughout the world. The special topic in this 1994 issue focuses on economic characteristics. Data available during 1986-95 include population by sex, population by age and sex, live births by sex, live births by age of the mother and sex of the child, deaths by sex, deaths by age and sex, expectation of life at exact ages by sex, infant deaths by sex, marriages, and divorces. Marriage by age of the groom and the bride is provided for the latest available year. Economic characteristics during 1985-94 include the participation rates of the economically active population by sex, age, and urban/rural residence; inactivity by functional group and sex, age, and urban/rural residence; industry, age, sex, and urban/rural residence for economically active persons; occupation as per industry table; employment or unemployment status by age, sex, and urban/rural residence; employment status and industry, sex, and urban/rural residence; and employment status and occupation, sex, and urban/rural residence. This issue presents special tables on the female economically active population by marital status, age, and urban/rural residence; and the economically active foreign born by occupation, age, and sex.
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  5. 5
    131299

    1995 demographic yearbook. 47th ed. 1995 annuaire demographique. 47 eme ed.

    United Nations. Department for Economic and Social Information and Policy Analysis. Statistics Division

    New York, New York, United Nations, 1997. x, 1087 p. (ST/ESA/STAT/SER.R/26)

    The Demographic Yearbook for 1995 presents comprehensive statistical tables of demography encompassing: population, vital statistics, infant mortality, maternal mortality, mortality, natality, nuptiality, divorce, and household characteristics for 233 countries throughout the world. The special topic in this 1995 issue focuses on household characteristics as updates from the 1987 issue. Data available during 1986-95 include population by sex, population by age and sex, live births by sex, live births by age of the mother and sex of the child, deaths by sex, deaths by age and sex, expectation of life at exact ages by sex, infant deaths by sex, marriages, and divorces. Marriage by age of the groom and the bride is provided for the latest available year. Household data from the census during 1985-95 pertain to household size and urban/rural residence, living arrangements by age and sex and by urban/rural residence, population by age and sex and by urban/rural residence, household by age and sex of householder and by urban/rural residence, and headship rates by age and sex of householder and by urban/rural residence. More detailed tables provide data on households by age and sex, by marital status, and by urban/rural residence; household size and relationship to head; and size and type of household.
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  6. 6
    081203

    Towards reversible vasectomy [editorial]

    Hargreave TB

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ANDROLOGY. 1992 Dec; 15(6):455-9.

    Bilateral vasectomy for contraceptive purposes is one of the most frequently performed minor operations; an estimated 50 million men have had it done to themselves. Vasectomy remains unacceptable in some countries, however, due to religion-imposed constraints or fear of side-effects or trauma. A 100% effective, reversible vasectomy without complications or side-effects would allay the fears of potential candidates for the procedure. To that end, the Male Task Force of the World Health Organization Special Program of Research, Development, and Research Training in Human Reproduction is supporting studies on reversible vasectomy. One-third of marriages in many developed countries end in separation, and many separated men tend to request a reversal of their vasectomies. The current least traumatic, effective vasectomy is the no-scalpel method developed in China. Minimal though it may be in terms of tissue disruption, this type of vasectomy is no less easy to reverse than any other surgical method. The practice of chemical vas occlusion using a carbolic acid-cyanoacrylate glue has potential, but is again no easier to reverse. Research has led to the consideration of whether an inert substance could be equally capable of plugging the vas, yet more easily reversible. Zhao et al, have successfully restored fertility in 130 men after removing polyurethane elastomer plugs 3-5 years after vasectomy. Efficacy studies are needed. The use of silicone plugs is also being evaluated. 9 months or more after insertion, however, may be required to secure azoospermia using either the polyurethane or silicone plugs. There may also be a prolonged period of leakage of viable spermatozoa around an inert plug which does not cause sclerosis. Finally, further study needs to be conducted to find the ideal size and shape of a silicone plug or plugs which may be used and whether secondary testicular or epididymal changes will make reversal difficult. It is pointed out, however, that secondary changes may take many years to develop and may not be relevant, since most reversals are requested within 5-10 years of vasectomy.
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  7. 7
    227286

    [Statistical country yearbook: members of the Council for Mutual Economic Assistance, 1984] Statisticheskii ezhegodnik stran--chlenov Soveta Ekonomicheskoi Vzaimopomoshchi, 1984.

    Sovet Ekonomicheskoi Vzaimopomoshchi

    Moscow, USSR, Finansy i Statistika, 1984. 456 p.

    This yearbook presents general statistical information for member countries of the Council for Mutual Economic Assistance. A section on population (pp. 7-14) includes data on area and population; population according to the latest census; average annual population; birth, death, and natural increase rates; infant mortality; average life expectancy; marriages and divorces; urban and rural population; and population distribution by social group. (ANNOTATION)
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  8. 8
    267350

    Report of the Expert Group on Fertility and Family. Introduction.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. Fertility and family. New York, New York, United Nations, 1984. 1-44. (International Conference on Population, 1984; Statements)

    This volume is comprised of the reports of the 1st of 4 Expert Group Meetings, scheduled in preparation for the 1984 International Conference on Population. Individuals and organizations attending this meeting are listed. The central task of the meeting was to examine critical, high-priority issues relevant to fertility and family and, on that basis, to make recommendations for action that would enhance the effectiveness of and compliance with the World Population Plan of Action, adopted in 1974 at Bucharest. The 1st item on the agenda dealt with ways in which modernization elements in the socio-cultural and economic patterns and institutions of societies alter reproduction. The 2nd topic of discussion was the relationship between family structure and fertility. The view adopted was that family structure could be influenced by a variety of factors that would have implications for fertility (e.g., delayed at marriage, improvements in education). The deliberations on factors influencing choice with respect to childbearing focused upon the complexity of decision making in matters of reproduction. In question, too, was a possible conflict between the acknowledged rights to freedom of choice in respect to childbearing and to the rights and goals of society, as well the acceptability of incentives and disincentives as measures introduced by governments to achieve social goals. The 4th item, reproductive and economic activity of women, was discussed from several perspectives: the amount of reproductive lifetime available to women for productive pursuits other than childbearing; the introduction of social support programs and income-generating opportunities. In the discussion of demographic goals and policy alternatives, the 5th item on the agenda, the policy options considered were family planning programs, incentives and desincentives, social and economic development, and marriage and divorce laws. Particular attention was given to the importance of local institutional settings for the achievement of government policy goals. The Expert Group's recommendations on population policy, family planning, the conditions of women, adolescent fertility, IEC, management and training, international cooperation and areas of research (demographic data, determinants of fertility, operational research and bio-medical) are included in this introduction. Finally, presented in the form of annexes are the agenda for the meeting, the list of documents and the texts of the opening statements.
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  9. 9
    019022

    Profile of Bangladesh women: selected aspects of women's roles and status in Bangladesh.

    Alamgir SF

    [Unpublished] 1977. 99 p.

    This report was prepared in response to a request from the Asian Bureau of the US Agency for International Development (USAID) that all USAID missions in Asia develop national profiles on the status of women in their countries. The 1st section of the report, "Women's Legal and Social Status," is based on the 1974 Bangladesh Population Census and presents information on the laws and customs related to women's property and inheritance rights, marriage, and divorce. The 2nd section, "The Rural Woman," provides information on the role of women in rural society. Although 90% of the 76.2 women in Bangladesh are rural, data in this area are limited. Statistics on Bangladeshi women are presented in an Appendix. These data reveal the subordinate position of women in Bangladesh society. Females account for only 0.9 million of the 20.5 million population in the labor force. Of the 7.8 million primary school graduates, 2.7 million are female; of the 4.0 million secondary school graduates, 0.7 million are female. Women constitute 0.07 million of the 0.7 million college graduates. An average number of 6 children/family is reported, and 0.8 million (4.7% of eligible couples) females practice family planning. Recognition of the contributions being made by women to Bangladesh society and development of these activities through additional training and support is urged. Greater participation of women in agriculture and other development activities should be encouraged. Recent indicators of the changing status of women in Bangladesh include the creation of a Women's Affairs Division within the President's Secretariat. In addition, 10% of public sector jobs are being reserved for women.
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  10. 10
    024689

    The women of rural Asia.

    Whyte RO; Whyte P

    Boulder, Colorado, Westview, 1982. 262 p. (Westview Special Studies on Women in Contemporary Society)

    This book provides a descriptive analysis of the historical, cultural, and environmental causes of women's current status in rural Asia. This analysis is requisite to improving the quality of these women's lives and enabling them to contribute to the economy without excessive disruption of family life and the social structure of the rural communities. Many studies of rural areas have ignored this half of the population. Analyzed in detail are social and economic status, family and workforce roles, and quality of life of women in the rural sectors of monsoonal and equatorial Asia, from Pakistan to Japan, where life often is characterized by unemployment, underemployment, and poverty. It has become increasingly necessary for rural women in this region to contribute to family budgets in ways beyond their traditional roles in crop production and animal husbandry. Many women are responding by taking part in rural industries, yet the considerable disadvantages under which they labor--less opportunity for education, lower pay, and poor access to resources and high status jobs--render them much less effective than they could be in their efforts to increase production and reduce poverty. A review of the activities of national and international agencies in relation to the status of women is also included, as well as an outline of major needs, and current indicators of change.
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  11. 11
    019419

    Marriage and divorce in Australia.

    Mcdonald PF

    In: United Nations [UN]. Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific [ESCAP]. Population of Australia. Vol. 1. New York, New York, UN, 1982. 183-98. (Country Monograph Series No. 9; ST/ESCAP/210)

    Australian marriage patterns in the late 19th century reflected those found among the English middle class, with a high proportion of males never marrying and late ages at 1st marriage. However, the attainment of the fertility transition in the 1930s stimulated a greater willingness to marry, even under adverse economic circumstances. A dramatic decline in age at marriage accompanied World War II. This decline, which continued throughout the 1950s and 60s, was further stimulated in the late 1960s by widespread use of oral contraceptives. Effective birth control allowed women to marry at a young age but delay childbearing until their careers had become established. The 1970s, however, were marked by the collapse of the early marriage pattern. The economic insecurity of that period led to a more conservative approach to the decision to marry, with postponement until economic security or psychological preparedness had been attained. These patterns have been noted across geographic, ethnic, religious and class groupings. Divorce reached high levels in 1947, as a result of the disruption caused by World War II, but then declined. The Family Law Act of 1975, which liberalized divorce requirements, led to an upsurge in the divorce rate in the 1970s. By 1980, there were 11.7 divorces/1000 married women. The increase in divorce is not just occurring among the younger generation of married women, but equally affects marriages that took place during the 1950s and 60s. There are an average of 2 children in divorces taking place among parents. 10% of ever-married women and 4% of ever-married men are widowed by the age of 50 years. By age 70, 40% of women and 11% of men are widowers. Although there has been little systematic study of remarriage, rates appear to be higher among younger men and women. Rates of remarriage seem to be higher after widowhood for men than women. Research should be directed to the question of whether the more cautious approach to marriage emerging in recent years achieves better quality marriages. Attention should also be given to trends in the proportion of men and women never marrying.
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