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  1. 1
    320224

    Mali: Innovative design of the Multi-Sectoral AIDS Project (MAP).

    Khan AR

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, Knowledge and Learning Center, 2005 Nov. [2] p. (Findings Infobriefs No. 118; Good Practice Infobrief)

    The Mali Multi-sectoral AIDS Project (MAP) began implementation in late 2004 and is in the preliminary phases of the project cycle. This project has been commended by the World Bank's Board for its innovation and the involvement of the private sector to address HIV/AIDS. Mali is one of the poorest countries in the world due to factors such as its limited resource base, land-locked status and poor infrastructure. According to the 2001 Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) published by the Ministry of Health, Mali's HIV/AIDS prevalence rate is estimated at 1.7% in 2001. The project objective is to support the Government of Malis efforts to control the spread of the HIV/AIDS epidemic and provide sustainable access to treatment and care to those infected with or affected by HIV/AIDS. While Mali currently has a low HIV prevalence rate by Sub-Saharan African standards, it runs a high risk of experiencing an increase in prevalence rates. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    319845

    Antiretrovirals are coming to Africa: Are you ready?

    Blyth M

    Health Policy and Development. 2004 Aug; 2(2):131-135.

    International agencies are beginning a rapid scaling up of antiretroviral distribution programs in Africa. Some are particularly looking for "faith-based organizations" (FBOs) as partners. The new initiatives may offer both unprecedented opportunities and some dangers for FBOs who wish to join in. The opportunities include increasing our capacity to provide not only HIV/AIDS care but other aspects of health care, and a potential for increased communication and cooperation between Christian organizations. The dangers include the likely widespread appearance of antiretroviral resistance; long term sustainability; negative impact on other aspects of HIV care and prevention; indirect costs to FBOs; corruption; encouragement of a culture of money and power, drawing FBOs away from their perceived missions; overextension; and harmful competition among FBOs. Organizations should be aware of the opportunities and dangers, and review their own calling and mission, before embarking on large-scale, externally-funded programs of ARV distribution. (author's)
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  3. 3
    310470
    Peer Reviewed

    South Africa's "rollout" of highly active antiretroviral therapy: A critical assessment.

    Nattrass N

    Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes. 2006 Dec; 43(5):618-623.

    The number of people on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in South Africa has risen from < 2000 in October 2003, to almost 200,000 by the end of 2005. Yet South Africa's performance in terms of HAART coverage is poor both in comparison with other countries and the targets set by the government's own Operational Plan. The public-sector HAART ''rollout'' has been uneven across South Africa's nine provinces and the role of external assistance from NGOs and funding agencies such as the Global Fund and PEPFAR has been substantial. The National Treasury seems to have allocated sufficient funding to the Department of Health for a larger HAART rollout, but the Health Minister has not mobilized it accordingly. Failure to invest sufficiently in human resources-- especially nurses--is likely to constrain the growth of HAART coverage. (author's)
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  4. 4
    303849

    Front line action in Poland.

    Pasek B

    Choices. 2001 Dec; 18-19.

    I don't have any used syringes. Somebody has stolen all, Anka was almost begging. In a worn-out black T-shirt and torn jeans, she looked helpless and desperate, standing in the middle of a vacant square, squeezed between Warsaw's main railway station and a Holiday Inn hotel. "I really don't have any," she repeated. "You know it's an exchange. Go and find some," Grzegorz Kalata said, patiently but firmly. Kalata comes to the square -- a meeting point for local drug users -- almost every evening. He is a streetworker from Monar, Poland's leading chain of non-profit detoxification centres. Under a harm reduction programme, partly sponsored by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), Kalata gives disposable syringes and needles, bandages, condoms and antiseptics to drug addicts who meet at the square. In return, he collects used syringes and needles in a plastic container, usually full by the end of his visit. After scouring the grass at the site, Anka came back with four used needles. Kalata gave her seven new ones and a package of bandages. On average, Kalata gives out some 200 needles and 150 syringes during an evening. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    303291

    Access to drugs. UNAIDS technical update.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]; World Health Organization [WHO]. Action Programme on Essential Drugs

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 1998 Oct. [12] p. (UNAIDS Best Practice Collection)

    The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that over one-third of the world's population has no guaranteed access to essential drugs. There are various reasons for this lack of access. Worldwide, the most important is affordability (drugs cost more money than is available to pay for them) but legal, infrastructural, distribution and cultural factors are also serious obstacles. The influence of each of these factors is different from country to country, just as frequencies of diseases also vary greatly. Among its activities aimed at improving drug access in developing countries (including technical services such as help in drug procurement and performance of needs estimates), WHO has drawn up a Model List of Essential Drugs, which is updated every two years. The tenth list (1997) has 308 priority drugs that provide safe, effective treatment for the infectious and chronic diseases which affect the vast majority of the world's population. The drugs are selected on the basis of cost-effectiveness within each drug class (e.g. of the dozens of penicillins only eight appear on the Essential Drugs list). With WHO's encouragement, more than 140 countries have developed their own national essential drug lists taking into account local needs, costs and available resources. (excerpt)
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  6. 6
    187399
    Peer Reviewed

    WHO's HIV/AIDS strategy under the spotlight.

    Marshall SJ

    Bulletin of the World Health Organization. 2004 Jun; 82(6):474-476.

    Since its introduction in 1996, highly active antiretroviral therapy (ART) has enabled people with HIV/AIDS in industrialized countries to live healthier, longer lives and to continue to contribute to the social and economic well-being of their families and societies. However, although 95% of the world's 40 million HIV-positive people are living in developing countries, only about 400 000 of the six million people requiring treatment actually received it in 2003. To address this treatment gap, at the UN General Assembly Special Session on HIV/AIDS in 2001, UN Member States unanimously committed to scaling up ART within their national HIV/AIDS programmes. In late 2003, WHO and UNAIDS declared the inequity in access to HIV/AIDS treatment a global public health emergency and launched the initiative, dubbed "3 by 5", which aims to treat three million people living with HIV in developing countries by the end of 2005. In a special interview with the Bulletin, WHO's Director of HIV/AIDS explains the principles behind the strategy, describes the challenges to its success and recounts the progress made towards achieving the target to date. (excerpt)
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