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Your search found 11 Results

  1. 1
    337896

    Position statement on condoms and the prevention of HIV, other sexually transmitted infections and unintended pregnancy.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]; World Health Organization [WHO]; Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    [Geneva, Switzerland], UNAIDS, 2015 Jul 7. [8] p.

    Condoms are a critical component in a comprehensive and sustainable approach to the prevention of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and are effective for preventing unintended pregnancies. Male and female condoms are the only devices that both reduce the transmission of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and prevent unintended pregnancy. Condoms have played a decisive role in HIV, STI and pregnancy prevention efforts in many countries. Condoms remain a key component of high-impact HIV prevention programmes. Quality-assured condoms must be readily available universally, either free or at low cost. Programmes promoting condoms must address stigma and gender-based and socio-cultural factors that hinder effective access and use of condoms. Adequate investment in and further scale up of condom promotion is required to sustain responses to HIV, other STIs, and unintended pregnancy. (Excerpts)
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  2. 2
    384217
    Peer Reviewed

    Working together to provide generics for health.

    Beck EJ; Reiss P

    Antiviral therapy. 2014; 19 Suppl 3:1.

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  3. 3
    319845

    Antiretrovirals are coming to Africa: Are you ready?

    Blyth M

    Health Policy and Development. 2004 Aug; 2(2):131-135.

    International agencies are beginning a rapid scaling up of antiretroviral distribution programs in Africa. Some are particularly looking for "faith-based organizations" (FBOs) as partners. The new initiatives may offer both unprecedented opportunities and some dangers for FBOs who wish to join in. The opportunities include increasing our capacity to provide not only HIV/AIDS care but other aspects of health care, and a potential for increased communication and cooperation between Christian organizations. The dangers include the likely widespread appearance of antiretroviral resistance; long term sustainability; negative impact on other aspects of HIV care and prevention; indirect costs to FBOs; corruption; encouragement of a culture of money and power, drawing FBOs away from their perceived missions; overextension; and harmful competition among FBOs. Organizations should be aware of the opportunities and dangers, and review their own calling and mission, before embarking on large-scale, externally-funded programs of ARV distribution. (author's)
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  4. 4
    305974
    Peer Reviewed

    WHO launches taskforce to fight counterfeit drugs.

    Burns W

    Bulletin of the World Health Organization. 2006 Sep; 84(9):685-764.

    The International Medical Products Anti-Counterfeiting Taskforce (IMPACT) aims to put a stop to the deadly trade in fake drugs, which studies suggest kill thousands of people every year. "We need to help people become more aware of the growing market in counterfeit medicines and the public health risks associated with this illegal practice," said Dr Howard Zucker, Assistant Director-General for the Health Technology and Pharmaceuticals cluster of departments at WHO. The taskforce will encourage the public, distributors, pharmacists and hospital staff to inform the authorities about their suspicions regarding the authenticity of a drug or vaccine. In a parallel move, the taskforce will help governments crack down on corruption in the sections of their police forces and customs authorities charged with enforcing laws against drug counterfeiting. Drug manufacturers will be encouraged to make their products more difficult to fake. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    303849

    Front line action in Poland.

    Pasek B

    Choices. 2001 Dec; 18-19.

    I don't have any used syringes. Somebody has stolen all, Anka was almost begging. In a worn-out black T-shirt and torn jeans, she looked helpless and desperate, standing in the middle of a vacant square, squeezed between Warsaw's main railway station and a Holiday Inn hotel. "I really don't have any," she repeated. "You know it's an exchange. Go and find some," Grzegorz Kalata said, patiently but firmly. Kalata comes to the square -- a meeting point for local drug users -- almost every evening. He is a streetworker from Monar, Poland's leading chain of non-profit detoxification centres. Under a harm reduction programme, partly sponsored by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), Kalata gives disposable syringes and needles, bandages, condoms and antiseptics to drug addicts who meet at the square. In return, he collects used syringes and needles in a plastic container, usually full by the end of his visit. After scouring the grass at the site, Anka came back with four used needles. Kalata gave her seven new ones and a package of bandages. On average, Kalata gives out some 200 needles and 150 syringes during an evening. (excerpt)
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  6. 6
    303291

    Access to drugs. UNAIDS technical update.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]; World Health Organization [WHO]. Action Programme on Essential Drugs

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 1998 Oct. [12] p. (UNAIDS Best Practice Collection)

    The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that over one-third of the world's population has no guaranteed access to essential drugs. There are various reasons for this lack of access. Worldwide, the most important is affordability (drugs cost more money than is available to pay for them) but legal, infrastructural, distribution and cultural factors are also serious obstacles. The influence of each of these factors is different from country to country, just as frequencies of diseases also vary greatly. Among its activities aimed at improving drug access in developing countries (including technical services such as help in drug procurement and performance of needs estimates), WHO has drawn up a Model List of Essential Drugs, which is updated every two years. The tenth list (1997) has 308 priority drugs that provide safe, effective treatment for the infectious and chronic diseases which affect the vast majority of the world's population. The drugs are selected on the basis of cost-effectiveness within each drug class (e.g. of the dozens of penicillins only eight appear on the Essential Drugs list). With WHO's encouragement, more than 140 countries have developed their own national essential drug lists taking into account local needs, costs and available resources. (excerpt)
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  7. 7
    069873
    Peer Reviewed

    Do nutrition programs make a difference? The case of Brazil.

    Musgrove P

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF HEALTH SERVICES. 1990; 20(4):691-715.

    PAHO followed nutrition programs of Brazil, which have been supported almost exclusively from internal sources, since 1983 to provide technical assistance and to learn what may be applied to other countries. The PAHO program effectiveness evaluation study compared 2 ways of running nutrition programs which presumed that malnutrition was mainly caused by poverty--a subsidy of basic foods and direct distribution--between 1974-1986. 2 programs subsidized at least 4 basic foodstuffs with 1 program restricting the amount of food to identified families while the other allowed any family coming to stores in low income areas that participated in the program to take subsidized food. 2 other programs either gave free traditional commercial foods or specially formulated supplements to identified clients. The status of most well nourished or malnourished participants did not change despite intervals as long as 48 months. Moreover the nutritional status of a considerable percentage of participants deteriorated. Nevertheless moderate or severe malnourished children who started in a program tended to recover substantially, especially children >1 year old. Further the longer a client participated in a program the more likely the nutritional status would improve, yet frequent participation did not affect status. Thus the programs were more likely to cure than prevent malnutrition. Besides participants tended to not grow much, but weight status did improve. Those programs that also provided medical care and health education were more effective than those that just provided subsidies. This finding highlights how malnutrition is not just a problem of low income and low food consumption, but also a problem of poor health. The programs did not transfer benefits efficiently. In addition, the costs of securing the food, its poor quality, and insufficient volume discouraged beneficiary participation.
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  8. 8
    068475

    Condom services to prevent HIV transmission: are they workable? [editorial]

    Friel P

    AIDS HEALTH PROMOTION EXCHANGE. 1989; (3):1-2.

    This editorial argues that in order to increase the use of condoms in the fight against AIDS, WHO's Global Program on AIDS (GPA) must address the problems of weak condom distribution and promotion systems. The available data indicates that condom use can protect against HIV transmission. Studies in Zaire, Denmark, Germany, and Australia reveal that seropositivity among prostitutes who use condoms is much lower than among prostitutes who do not use condoms. However, the use of condoms largely depends on whether services are available to the people who practice risk behavior, and whether such people can be motivated to adopt safe sex practices -- including proper and consistent condom use. In order to bring about this desired behavior change, it is essential to have a strongly managed integrated program that combines condom services and health promotion, as well as specific plans and budgets to distribute and promote condoms. In supporting national AIDS programs, GPA's current strategy for condom services includes the following: 1) the provision of high-quality, low-cost condoms; 2) assistance in developing comprehensive program management and technical support plans and budgets for incorporation into subsequent funding cycles; and 3) support for research and development of new methods for preventing the sexual transmission of HIV -- including barrier methods that can be controlled by women.
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  9. 9
    059220

    Health economics in developing countries.

    Abel-Smith B

    JOURNAL OF TROPICAL MEDICINE AND HYGIENE. 1989 Aug; 92(4):229-41.

    This general discussion on health economics provides an historical overview as well as a discussion of some of the developments and deficiencies in health economics in developing countries, broadly focused on expenditure and financing studies, cost benefit and cost effectiveness, local costing studies and health planning. In 1963, it was found that as GDP rose so did health expenditures, that countries with similar per capita income spent different percentages of GDp on health services, that the private sector involvement was greater than the public, and that hospitals received most of the money. Countries were encouraged to conduct further studies. The World Bank has successfully stimulated discussion. However, lacking the expenditure studies, cost benefits are hampered by the availability of epidemiological data and poor cost information, and geared toward studies on how to cut costs for immediate goals, or specific diseases, rather than on practical advice to governments. 1 such study helped identify that most cost effective allocation of resources. The limited local cost studies are particular to understanding specific costs of immunization versus antenatal visits; however, the usefulness of such preliminary information reveals wide variability between countries. The Health for All initiatives and the limited resources in developing countries have placed health planning in a central position with Ministries of Health. Due to prior mistakes in planning an excess number of trained medical staff are underutilized and present needs have been defined as developing local PHC support staff. The WHO expectation of 5% of GNP for health service was unfulfilled because larger donor aid and local resources have not been sufficient even with strong posturing, and over ambitious plans were made unrealistically. Since 1987, WHO has provided economic strategies but the economic crises changed the needs. Many questions remain and consultants are too few, improperly trained, or unavailable for the appropriate time period: unacceptable solutions, coupled with a confusing World bank prospectus for action when more research is needed. Intersectorial collaboration has not provided answers to priorities or addressed the interactions among nutrition and agricultural policy, education and lifestyle, water and sanitation and the economy. The research agenda should include: the identification of the determinants of health, key elements of primary health care (PHC), cost of delivering PHC, hospital efficiency, health manpower mix, adequate procurement and distribution, appropriate technology, user charges for financing, health insurance, and community financing.
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  10. 10
    091301

    Essential drugs and developing countries: a review and selected annotated bibliography.

    Mamdani M; Walker G

    London, England, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Evaluation and Planning Centre for Health Care, 1985 Winter. 97 p. (EPC Publication No. 8)

    Many developing countries spend sizeable sums on the purchase of drugs yet an estimated 60-80% of their populations, particulary in rural areas, do not have constant access to even the most essential drugs. The provision of adequate amounts of effective drugs to treat the most important and common disease conditions is crucial if health services are to be effective and credible. Many problems are associated with the provision and utilization of therapeutic drugs in developing countries: inequitable access to cost-effective safe drugs; inequitable production and consumption with market concentration in the hands of a few multinationals encouraging competition based on product differntion and not price; escalating drug costs; inefficient procurement, distribution, management; and irrational prescription and consumption. To combat these problems, the essential drug concept was introduced by the WHO in 1977. In 1981, WHO established a special Action Program on Essential Drugs. This is a worldwide collaborative program that aims at urging member states to adopt national drug policies, as well as helping developing countries procure and use essential drugs. Several countries have implemented some of the suggestions of the Drug Action Program. Though some progress has been made towards achieving an increase in the use and availability of cost-effective drugs, very few countries have succeeded in decreasing the use of unsafe drugs and those of low cost-effectiveness. Effective legislation is a prerequisite to the effective use of drugs. Recommended action for governments of developing countries to involve the private sector include: creating incentive for increased domestice production; controlling promotional practices; and exerting price controls.
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  11. 11
    119388

    The decision makers. [editorial]

    Senanayake P

    British Journal of Family Planning. 1984 Jul; 10(37):37.

    This editorial takes a broad, international look at the worldwide implications of decisions taken in the United Kingdom (U.K.) and the US with regard to family planning. National authorities, like the U.K. Committee for Safety of Medicines (CSM) of the US Food and Drug Administration, address issues concerning the safety of pharmaceutical products in terms of risk/benefit ratios applicable in their countries. International repercussions of US and U.K. decision making must be considered, especially in the area of pharmaceutical products, where they have an important world leadership role. Much of the adverse publicity of the use of Depo-Provera has focused on the fact that it was not approved for longterm use in the U.K. and the US. It is not equally known that the CSM, IPPF and WHO recommeded approval, but were overruled by the licensing agencies. The controversy caused by the Lancet articles of Professors with family planning doctors. At present several family planning issues in the U.K., such as contraception for minors, have implications for other countries. A campaign is being undertaken to enforce 'Squeal' laws in the U.K. and the US requiring parental consent for their teenagers under 16 to use contraceptives. In some developing countries, urbanization heightens the problem of adolescent sexuality. Carefully designed adolescent programs, stressing the need for adequate counseling, are needed. Many issues of international interest go unnoticed in the U.K. International agencies, like the WHO and UNiCEF, have embarked on a global program to promote lactation both for its benficial effects on an infant's growth and development and for birth spacing effects. It may be of benefit to family planning professionals in the U.K. to pay attention to international activity in such issues.
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