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  1. 1
    052122

    Guide to sources of international population assistance 1988, fifth edition.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund, 1988. xi, 477 p. (Population Programmes and Projects Vol. 1.)

    This is the 5th edition of the GUIDE to be published. A new edition is issued every 3 years. The GUIDE was mandated by the World Population Plan of Action, adopted by consensus at the World Population Conference held in Bucharest, Romania, in August 1974. Each entry for an organization describes its mandates, fields of special interest, program areas in which assistance is provided, types of support activities which can be provided, restrictions on types of assistance, channels of assistance, how to apply for assistance, monitoring and evaluation of programs, reporting requirements, and address, of organization. International population assistance is broadly construed as 1) direct financial grants or loans to governments or national and non-governmental organizations within developing countries; 2) indirect grants for commodities, equipment, or vehicles; and 3) technical assistance training programs, expert and advisory services, and information programs. To gather information for this edition of the GUIDE, a questionnaire was sent to more than 350 multilateral, regional, bilateral, non-governmental, university, research agencies, organizations, and institutions throughout the world.
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  2. 2
    269577

    Inventory of population projects in developing countries around the world 1985/1986.

    United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 1987. xi, 826 p. (Population Programmes and Projects V. 2)

    Internationally-assisted population projects funded, inaugurated, or being carried out by multilateral, bilateral, nongovernmental, and other agencies and organizations during the January, 1985--June, 1986 period are described for most developing countries/territories. Most demographic and population data were from UN-sponsored research, including individual government views regarding population; other UN agencies provided data on such topcs as agricultural production density; the UN Food and Agriculture Organization, and the World Bank was the source of some economic data. Funding sources for various projects are generally not indicated: the focus is on which agencies are dowing what. US$ values of project funding are given where possible. Chapter 1 lists country information. Chapter 2 describes regional, interregional, and Global programes in Africa, Asia and the Pacific, Latin America and the Caribbean, the Middle East and Western Asia, and Europe. This information is structured similarly to the country information, with a demographic fact sheet followed by categorized descriptions of organizational assistance projects. Sources and an index are provided.
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  3. 3
    199619

    Inventory of population projects in developing countries around the world 1983/84.

    United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, United Nations Fund for Population Activities, [1984]. x, 731 p. (Population Programmes and Projects, v. 2.)

    The eleventh edition of this inventory shows population projects in developing countries that are funded, inaugurated, or carried out by international, bilateral, nongovernmental, or other agencies from January 1, 1983 - June 30, 1984. Projects funded prior to 1983 and still viable are included whenever possible. Listings are by country and then by organization. Budgets are given where known. Each country section also includes basic demographic data and a brief statement on government population policy. Regional and global sections conclude the volume. Neither developed country activities nor projects funded and executed in the same country are listed. Appendices include a bibliography of information sources, a list of addresses, a bibliography of informative newsletters and journals, and an index.
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  4. 4
    267341

    Primary health care bibliography and resource directory.

    Montague J; Montague S; Cebula D; Favin M

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Federation of Public Health Associations [WFPHA], 1984 Aug. vii, 78 p. (Information for Action)

    This bibliograph contains 4 parts. Part 1 is anannotated bibiography covering the following topics: an overview of health care in developing countries; planning and management of primary health care (PHC): manpower training and utilization; community participation and health education; delivery of health services, including nutrition, maternal and child health, family planning, medical and dental care; disease control, water and sanitation, and pharmaceutical; and auxiliary services, Part 2 is a reference directory covering periodicals directories, handbooks and catalogs, in PHC, as well as computerized information services, educational aids and training programs, (including audiovisual and other teaching aids), and procurement of supplies and pharmaceuticals. Also given are lists of international and private donor agencies, including development cooperation agencies, and directories of foundations and proposal writing. Parts 3 and 4 are the August 1984 updates of the original May 1982 edition of the bibliography.
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  5. 5
    267312

    Report on developments and activities related to population information during the decade since the convening of the World Population Conference, Bucharest, 1974.

    Hankinson R

    New York, United Nations, 1984 Jun. vi, 52 p. (POPIN Bulletin No. 5 ISEA/POPIN/5)

    A summary of developments in the population information field during the decade 1974-84 is presented. Progress has been made in improving population services that are available to world users. "Population Index" and direct access to computerized on-line services and POPLINE printouts are available in the US and 13 other countries through a cooperating network of institutions. POPLINE services are also available free of charge to requestors from developing countries. Regional Bibliographic efforts are DOCPAL for Latin America. PIDSA for Africa, ADOPT and EBIS/PROFILE. Much of the funding and support for population information activities comes from 4 major sources: 1) UN Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA): 2) US Agency for International Development (USAID); 3) International Development Research Centre (IRDC): and 4) the Government of Australia. There are important philosophical distinctions in the support provided by these sources. Duplication of effort is to be avoided. Many agencies need to develop an institutional memory. They are creating computerized data bases on funded projects. The creation of these data bases is a major priority for regional population information services that serve developing countries. Costs of developing these information services are prohibitive; however, it is important to see them in their proper perspective. Many governments are reluctant to commit funds for these activites. Common standards should be adopted for population information. Knowledge and use of available services should be increased. The importance os back-up services is apparent. Hard-copy reproductions of items in data bases should be included. This report is primarily descriptive rather than evaluative. However, given the increase in population distribution and changes in government attitudes over the importance of population matters, the main tasks for the next decade should be to build on these foundations; to insure effective and efficient use of services; to share experience and knowledge through POPIN and other networks; and to demonstrate to governments the valuable role of information programs in developing national population programs.
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