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  1. 1
    270643

    Pacific partners, a guide to United Nations agencies in the Pacific.

    United Nations

    Sydney, Australia, United Nations Information Center, 1985. 97 p.

    This booklet, describing support available from the UN, is a valuable resource for decision-makers and others interested in development issues. The South Pacific, a vast oceanic region of 100s of scatted islands, is rapidly changing. Since the early 1960s, 11 South Pacific countries have attained self-government or independence, and 5 are now numbered among the 159 member states of the UN. New issues and events keep the region is sharp international focus. While technological progress has reduced distances between the islands, the South Pacific countries continue to face many development challenges in health, housing, education, and adequate nutrition and water supplies. Growing urbanization, increased dependence on imported foods, and cash crops for exports are affecting the environmental and cultural patterns of the South Pacific. These issues are of primary concern to both the South Pacific and the UN. Over 30 of the UN family of agencies are cooperating with the governments of the Cook Islands, Fiji, Kiribati, Republic of the Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Nauru, Niue, Republic of Palau (Belau), Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Tokelau, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu, and Western Samoa. The UN provides expertise and training opportunities, as well as capital assistance, to help improve the lives of the South Pacific islanders as they move towards self-sufficiency.
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  2. 2
    273040

    International Development Research Centre, projects 1970-1981.

    International Development Research Centre [IDRC]

    Ottawa, Canada, IDRC, 1982. 384 p.

    The 1115 projects listed in this publication represent 10 years of research activity supported by the International Development Research Centre (IDRC), from the 1st year of operation in 1971 to March 1981. In another sense they represent an account of the growing human resources competent to contribute to science and technology in developing countries--an illustration of how technology and skills are acquired in the process of securing a measure of well-being for the world's poor. The subject/area index lists projects according to their specific subjects or field of research and according to country of geographic region. Projects have been indexed using the IDRC Library Thesaurus, which is based on an internationally accepted controlled vocabulary of descriptors used to index and retrieve information about development. A brief project rationale and statement of research objectives is given for each project. The expected duration of the research is given in months, followed by a notation of "active" or "completed". A project is deemed to be completed when the initiating program division is satisfied that the work undertaken during the course of the project is finished. The project recipient organization and location is included, as well as a grant figure representing the IDRC contribution to the research. Program areas within IDRC include agriculture; food and nutrition sciences; cooperative programs; information sciences; social sciences; communications; projects of the Office of the Secretary; Special Governing Board Activities; and those of the Office of the President. Precedence for projects is given to requests from developing countries.
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