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Your search found 23 Results

  1. 1
    070219

    Venezuela.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume III. Oman to Zimbabwe, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 206-9. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.2; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.2)

    Venezuela's 1985 population of 17,317,000 is projected to grow to 38,000,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 39.5% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 5.3% were over the age of 60. 27.8% and 11.5% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 27.4 to 13.8 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 69.0 to 73.7 years, the crude death rate will increase from 5.5 to 6.3, while infant mortality will decline from 29.0 to 20.0. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 4.1 to 2.6, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 33.0 to 20.1. The 1977 contraceptive prevalence rate was 49.3, while the 1981 female mean age at 1st marriage was 21.2 years. Urban population will increase from 87.6% in 1985 to 96.0% overall by the year 2025. Population growth, fertility and emigration are considered to be acceptable by the government, while mortality, morbidity, high immigration, and spatial distribution are not. Venezuela does not have an explicit population policy. Fertility and health are addressed under more broad social sector policy and in the general context of family welfare. While the government does not directly intervene to affect population growth or fertility, sectoral programs and national development plans have had an impact on population dynamics. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  2. 2
    070217

    Uruguay.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume III. Oman to Zimbabwe, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 198-201. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.2; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.2)

    Uruguay's 1985 population of 3,012,000 is projected to grow to 3,875,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 26.9% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 15.3% were over the age of 60. 22.1% and 17.4% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 9.3 to 5.2 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 70.3 to 73.4 years, the crude death rate will remain constant at 10.2, and infant mortality will decline from 30.0 to 16.0. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 2.8 to 2.2, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 19.5 to 15.4. No information is reported on the contraceptive prevalence rate, while the 1975 female mean age at 1st marriage was 22.4 years. Urban population will increase from 84.6% in 1985 to 91.6% overall by the year 2025. Mortality and morbidity are considered to be acceptable by the government, while low population growth, fertility, immigration, high emigration, and spatial distribution are not. Uruguay has an explicit population policy. It aims to increase population growth, fertility, and immigration, while reducing morbidity, mortality, and emigration. Return migration is also encouraged. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  3. 3
    070215

    United Republic of Tanzania.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume III. Oman to Zimbabwe, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 190-3. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.2; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.2)

    Tanzania's 1985 population of 22,751,000 is projected to grow to 84,784,000 by year 2025. In 1985, 48.6% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 3.8% were over the age of 60. 39.0% and 4.6% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 35.4 to 23.5 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 51.0 to 66.5 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 15.3 to 5.8, while infant mortality will decline from 115.0 to 49.0. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 7.1 to 3.6, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 50.6 to 29.4. No information is reported on the contraceptive prevalence rate, while the 1978 female mean age at 1st marriage was 19.2 years. Urban population will increase from 24.4% in 1985 to 64.2% overall by the year 2025. Insignificant international migration and spatial distribution are considered to be acceptable by the government, while population growth, mortality, morbidity and fertility are not. The United Republic of Tanzania does not have an explicit population policy. The government considers poverty to be the nation's most troubling concern, and has created the Population and Development Planning and Policy Unit to foster the integration of population and development. A draft national population policy was prepared in 1988. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  4. 4
    070214

    United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume III. Oman to Zimbabwe, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 186-9. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.2; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.2)

    The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland's 1985 population of 56,618,000 is projected to grow to 57,464,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 19.2% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 20.7% were over the age of 60. 17.2% and 27.5% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 1.3 to -0.1 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 74.0 to 79.6 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 11.7 to 11.5, while infant mortality will decline from 11.0 to 5.0. The fertility rate will rise over the period from 1.8 to 1.9, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 13.0 to 11.4. The 1983 contraceptive prevalence rate was 83, while the 1981 female mean age at 1st marriage was 22.8 years. Urban population will increase from 91.7% in 1985 to 95.8% overall by the year 2025. Population growth, fertility, spatial distribution, and low emigration are considered to be acceptable by the government, while mortality and high immigration are not. The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland does not have an explicit population policy. Recent legislation has, however, been enacted to stem the flow of immigrants into the country. The government considers decisions on fertility and child-bearing best left to individuals and limits itself to providing family planning and health information and services. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  5. 5
    070213

    United Arab Emirates.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume III. Oman to Zimbabwe, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 182-5. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.2; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.2)

    The United Arab Emirates' 1985 population of 1,350,000 is projected to grow to 2,692,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 31.0% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 2.4% were over the age of 60. 24.8% and 18.6% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 23.0 to 8.6 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 69.2 to 77.6 years, the crude death rate will increase from 3.6 to 8.1, while infant mortality will decline from 32.0 to 7.0. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 7.2 to 3.6, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 26.6 to 16.8. No information is reported on the contraceptive prevalence rate, while the 1975 female mean age at 1st marriage was 18.0 years. Urban population will increase from 77.8% in 1985 to 84.9% overall by the year 2025. Mortality, morbidity, fertility, spatial distribution, and insignificant emigration are considered to be acceptable by the government, while high population growth and immigration are not. The United Arab Emirates does not have an explicit population policy. The government is, however, intent upon reducing its heavy dependency upon immigrant workers, and will increasingly restrict immigration and migration to urban areas while encouraging continued high fertility among the native-born population. Economic development and social change are also fostered to raise the standard of living. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  6. 6
    070208

    Turkey.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume III. Oman to Zimbabwe, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 162-5. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.2; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.2)

    Turkey's 1985 population of 50,345,000 is projected to grow to 89,646,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 36.4% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 6.4% were over the age of 60. 22.9% and 13.6% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 20.8 to 9.0 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 61.6 to 74.6 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 9.4 to 6.7, while infant mortality will decline from 92.0 to 19.0. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 3.9 to 2.1, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 30.2 to 16.3. The 1983 contraceptive prevalence rate was 51.0, while the 1980 female mean age at 1st marriage was 20.7 years. Urban population will increase from 45.9% in 1985 to 69.8% overall by the year 2025. Significant immigration and spatial distribution are considered to be acceptable by the government, while high population growth, fertility, mortality, and low emigration are not. Turkey has an explicit population policy. It aims to reduce population growth and fertility through family planning programs and family welfare provisions, reduce mortality through expanded, local-level public health services, and reduce migration to urban areas. Policy supports increased emigration. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  7. 7
    070207

    Tunisia.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume III. Oman to Zimbabwe, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 158-61. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.2; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.2)

    Tunisia's 1985 population of 7,261,000 is projected to grow to 13,284,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 39.6% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 6.0% were over the age of 60. 22.5% and 13.1% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 25.3 to 10.2 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 63.1 to 75.0 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 8.4 to 5.9, while infant mortality will decline from 71.0 to 16.0. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 4.9 to 2.1, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 33.7 to 16.0. The 1983 contraceptive prevalence rate was 41.1, while the 1984 female mean age at 1st marriage was 24.3 years. Urban population will increase from 53.0% in 1985 to 72.6% overall by the year 2025. Insignificant immigration is considered to be acceptable by the government, while the high population growth, mortality, fertility, low emigration, and spatial distribution are not. Tunisia has an explicit population policy. It aims to lower the birth rate and population growth, extend family health services in rural areas, improve living conditions and health care facilities for infants and small children, decrease migration to metropolitan areas, and adjust the spatial distribution pattern. Population policy as it related to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  8. 8
    070204

    Togo.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume III. Oman to Zimbabwe, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 146-9. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.2; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.2)

    Togo's 1985 population of 2,960,000 is projected to grow to 9,500,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 44.8% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 5.1% were over the age of 60. 38.4% and 5.6% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 29.5 to 22.6 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 50.5 to 67.0 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 15.7 to 6.3, while infant mortality will decline from 102.0 to 40.0. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 6.1 to 3.6, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 45.2 to 28.9. The 1988 contraceptive prevalence rate was 33.1, while the 1971 female mean age at 1st marriage was 18.5 years. Urban population will increase from 2.1% in 1985 to 53.0% overall by the year 2025. Population growth, fertility, and low international migration are considered to be acceptable by the government, while mortality, morbidity, and spatial distribution are not. Togo does not have an explicit population policy. The government does, however, support family planning and maternal-child health services, and is interested in population redistribution. It hopes to reduce mortality levels while also developing employment opportunities for the growing population. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  9. 9
    070203

    Thailand.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume III. Oman to Zimbabwe, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 142-5. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.2; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.2)

    Thailand;s 1985 population of 51,604,000 is projected to grow to 80,911,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 36.5% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 5.6% were over the age of 60. 21.0% and 15.5% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 19.9 to 7.0 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 62.7 to 74.6 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 8.0 to 7.4, while infant mortality will decline from 48.0 to 13.0. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 3.5 to 2.1, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 27.8 to 14.4. The 1987 contraceptive prevalence rate was 65.5, while the 1980 female mean age at 1st marriage was 22.7 years. Urban population will increase from 19.8% in 1985 to 49.2% overall by the year 2025. Insignificant international migration is considered to be acceptable by the government, while high population growth, mortality, morbidity, fertility, and spatial distribution are not. Thailand has an explicit population policy. Encouraging the voluntary acceptance of family planning and the notion of a small family ideal, policy supports a reduction in the rate of population growth. Health and socioeconomic objectives as well as a balanced population distribution are also included as well as balanced population distribution are also included under the rubric of population policy. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  10. 10
    070202

    Syrian Arab Republic.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume III. Oman to Zimbabwe, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 138-41. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.2; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.2)

    The Syrian Arab Republic's 1985 population of 10,458,000 is projected to grow to 32,271,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 48.1% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 4.3% were over the age of 60. 30.8% and 6.5% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. THe rate of natural increase will have declined from 36.9 to 17.8 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 62.6 to 74.3 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 8.6 to 3.7, while infant mortality will decline from 59.0 to 15.0. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 7.2 to 2.6, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 45.5 to 21.5. The 1978 contraceptive prevalence rate was 19.8, while the 1981 female mean age at 1st marriage was 21.5 years. Urban population will increase from 49.5% in 1985 to 72.0% overall by the year 2025. Population growth, morbidity, mortality, fertility, spatial distribution, and insignificant immigration are considered to be acceptable by the government, while high emigration is not. The Syrian Arab Republic does not have an explicit population policy. Policies address the improvement of health, education, and cultural and housing conditions, especially in rural areas, with no governmental intervention in fertility. They aim to more effectively and efficiently channel resources to various sectors of the economy. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  11. 11
    070201

    Switzerland.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume III. Oman to Zimbabwe, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 134-7. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.2; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.2)

    Switzerland's 1985 population of 6,470,000 is projected to shrink to 6,118,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 16.9% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 19.6% were over the age of 60. 14.3% and 33.7% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 2.3 to --4.2 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 76.3 to 80.6 years, the crude death rate will increase from 9.3 to 13.5, while infant mortality will decline from 8.0 to 5.0. The fertility rate will rise over the period from 1.5 to 1.7, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 11.6 to 9.3. The 1980 contraceptive prevalence rate was 71.2, while the 1980 female mean age at 1st marriage was 25.0 years. Urban population will increase from 58.2% in 1985 to 69.5% overall by the year 2025. Population growth, mortality, morbidity, spatial distribution, and international migration levels are considered to be acceptable by the government, while the low fertility level is not. Switzerland has an explicit population policy. Indirect measures will be applied in attempts to raise fertility. These would include improving the situation of families and children, and imposing more stringent regulations on immigration. Population policy as it related to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  12. 12
    070200

    Sweden.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume III. Oman to Zimbabwe, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 130-3. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.2; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.2)

    Sweden's 1985 population of 8,350,000 is projected to shrink to 8,136,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 17.5% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 23.6% were over the age of 60. 15.6% and 30.0% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 0.3 to -2.3 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 76.3 to 80.6 years, the crude death rate will increase from 11.0 to 12.7, while infant mortality will decline from 7.0 to 5.0. The fertility rate will rise over the period from 1.7 to 1.8, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 11.3 to 10.4. The 1981 contraceptive prevalence rate was 78.1, while the 1980 female mean age at 1st marriage was 27.6 years. Urban population will increase from 83.4% in 1985 to 90.5% overall by the year 2025. All of these indicators and trends are considered to be acceptable by the government while only spatial distribution is marginally not. Sweden does not have an explicit population policy. Population policies are part and parcel of broader socioeconomic policy, with, nonetheless, an interest in limiting future levels of immigration and adjusting urban-rural spatial imbalance. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  13. 13
    070186

    Sudan.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume III. Oman to Zimbabwe, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 118-21. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.2; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.2)

    Sudan's 1985 population of 21,818,000 is projected to grow to 59,594,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 45.2% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 4.5% were over the age of 60. 33.9% and 6.3% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined by 28.6 to 17.4 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 47.8 to 63.8 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 17.3 to 7.7, while infant mortality will decline from 118.0 to 51.0. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 6.6 to 3.0, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 45.9 to 25.1. The 1978/79 contraceptive prevalence rate was 4.6, while the 1973 female mean age at 1st marriage was 18.7 years. Urban population will increase from 20.6% in 1985 to 45.5% overall by the year 2025. Population growth and fertility are considered to be acceptable by the government, while mortality, spatial distribution, and significantly high immigration and emigration are not. Sudan does not have an explicit population policy. Official focus centers largely upon improving the standard of living through attention to infant and maternal mortality, maternal-child care, and providing primary health care and basic social services. The status of women and a modified spatial distribution are other priority concerns of the government. Population policy as it related to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  14. 14
    070185

    Sri Lanka.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume III. Oman to Zimbabwe, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 114-7. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.2; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.2)

    Sri Lanka's 1985 population of 16,108,000 is projected to grown to 24,449,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 34.1% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 71.1% were over the age of 60. 21.6% and 17.2% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 20.5 to 7.5 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 68.9 to 77.2 years, the crude death rate will increase from 6.3 to 7.2, while infant mortality will decline from 39.0 to 13.0. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 3.3 to 2.1, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 26.9 to 14.7. The 1987 contraceptive prevalence rate was 62.0, while the 1981 female mean age at 1st marriage was 24.4 years. Urban population will increase from 21.1% n 1985 to 42.6% overall by he year 2025. Insignificant levels of international migration and spatial distribution are considered to be acceptable by the government, while high population growth, mortality, morbidity, and fertility are not. Sri Lanka has an explicit population policy. It aims to reduce population growth and adjust the age structure by lowering fertility and infant and child mortality. Strengthened and expanded family planning services, financial incentives for women using IUDs, and population education are components of this approach. Population policy as it related to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  15. 15
    070184

    Spain.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume III. Oman to Zimbabwe, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 110-3. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.2; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.2)

    Spain's 1985 population of 38,602,000 is projected to grown to 42,530,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 22.9% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 17.1% were over the age of 60. 16.6% and 26.1% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 5.6 to 0.8 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 75.8 to 80.3 years, the crude birth death rate will increase from 7.7 to 10.3, while infant mortality will decline from 11.0 to 6.0. The fertility rate will rise over the period from 1.8 to 1.9, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 13.3 to 11.0. The 1985 contraceptive prevalence rate was 59.4, while the 1981 female mean age at 1st marriage was 23.1 years. Urban population will increase from 75.8% in 1985 to 88.8% overall by the year 2025. All of these indicators and trends are considered to be acceptable by the government. Spain, therefore, does not have an explicit population policy. The government considers the country's demographic situation to be stable, and deems fertility to be an individual matter. Population policy as it related to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken regarding the above-mentioned demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  16. 16
    070183

    South Africa.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume III. Oman to Zimbabwe, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 106-9. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.2; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.2)

    South Africa's 1985 population of 31,593,000 is projected to grow to 63,232,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 37.8% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 6.2% were over the age of 60. 26.1% and 11.2% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 22.1 to 11.2 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 57.9 to 72.66 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 11.0 to 6.6, while infant mortality will decline from 83.0 to 22.0. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 4.8 to 2.3, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 33.1 to 17.7. The 1981 contraceptive prevalence rate was 48.0., while the 1980 female mean age at 1st marriage was 25.7 years. Urban population will increase from 56.0% in 1985 to 77.3% overall by the year 2025. Significant immigration and insignificant emigration are considered to be acceptable by the government, while high population growth, mortality, high fertility, and spatial distribution are not. South Africa has an explicit population policy. By improving living standards of the population, the government hopes to lower fertility and population growth. Policy focuses upon improving education, manpower training, primary health care, family planning, economic development, housing, controlled urbanization, and rural development. Population policy as it related to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  17. 17
    070182

    Somalia.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume III. Oman to Zimbabwe, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 102-5. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.2; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.2)

    Somalia's 1985 population of 6,398,000 is projected to grow to 18,903,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 45.9% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 4.4% were over the age of 60. 38.2% and 5.4% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 31.7 to 20.2 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 43.0 to 59.0 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 22.3 to 9.5, while infant mortality will decline from 143.0 to 69.0. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 6.6 to 3.6, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 53.9 to 29.7. No information is reported on the contraceptive prevalence rate, while the 1980/81 female mean age at 1st marriage was 20.1 years. Urban population will increase from 32.5% in 1985 to 62.5% overall by the year 2025. Population growth, fertility, immigration, significant emigration, and spatial distribution are considered to be acceptable by the government, while mortality is not. Somalia does not have an explicit population policy. Viewing the nation as sparsely populated and lacking socioeconomic development, the government does not intervene to modify population growth and fertility. School programs do, however, offer education on population issues. Population policy as it related to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  18. 18
    070180

    Singapore.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume III. Oman to Zimbabwe, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 94-7. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.2; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.2)

    Singapore's 1985 population of 2,559,000 is projected to grown to 3,239,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 24.5% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 7.7% were over the age of 60. 16.6% and 27.0% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 11.6 to 1.2 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 71.8 to 1.2 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 71.8 to 78.3 years, the crude death rate will increase from 5.4 to 9.8, while infant mortality will decline from 10.0 to 5.0. The fertility rate will rise over the period from 1.7 to 1.8, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 17.0 to 11.0. The 1982 contraceptive prevalence rate was 74.2, while the 1980 female mean age at 1st marriage was 26.2 years. Population growth, mortality, morbidity, and insignificant international migration are considered to be acceptable by the government, while low fertility is not. Singapore has an explicit population policy. Higher fertility is desired, especially among more educated women. Accordingly, as of 1985, the government abandoned its 2-child family policy in favor of a new program offering incentives for couples to have at least 3 children. Higher fertility is encouraged for the entire population. Complementary programs promote social and economic advancement. Population policy as it related to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  19. 19
    070169

    Republic of Korea.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume III. Oman to Zimbabwe, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 42-5. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.2; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.2)

    The republic of Korea's 1985 population of 41,056,000 is projected to grow to 54,627,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 30.0% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 6.8% were over the age of 60. 17.5% and 20.7% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 15.0 to 2.7 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 67.7 to 76.6 years, the crude death rate will increase from 6.3 to 8.9, while infant mortality will decline from 30.0 to 8.0. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 2.4 to 1.8, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 21.3 to 11.6. The 1988 contraceptive prevalence rate was 77.0, while the 1980 female mean age at 1st marriage was 24.1 years. Urban population will increase from 65.3% in 1985 to 87.9% overall by the year 2025. Fertility, international migration, and spatial distribution are considered to be acceptable by the government, while population growth and mortality are not. The Republic of Korea has an explicit population policy. It is aimed primarily at reducing population growth, yet also extends to more broad welfare-oriented policy, spatial distribution, improving social equity and the status of women, and securing the welfare of the aged. While success has been met from efforts to modify fertility and mortality, family planning efforts have been bolstered with hopes of gaining further reductions in fertility. Population policy as it related to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  20. 20
    070166

    Poland.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume III. Oman to Zimbabwe, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 30-3. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.2; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.2)

    Poland's 1985 population of 37,203,000 is projected to grow to 45,066,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 25.5% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 13,8% were over the age of 60. 19.6% and 22.2% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 9.6 to 3.3 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 70.9 to 77.3 years, the crude death rate will increase from 9.6 to 9.8, while infant mortality will decline from 20.0 to 7.0. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 2.3 to 2.1, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 19.2 to 13.1. The 1977 contraceptive prevalence rate was 75.0, while the 1984 female mean age at 1st marriage was 22.8 years. Urban population will increase from 61.0% in 1985 to 71.0% overall by the year 2025. Population size and growth, fertility, immigration, and spatial distribution are considered to be acceptable by the government, while population age structure, mortality, morbidity, and too high emigration are not. Poland has an explicit population policy. Aiming to establish a stable population, policies control internal migration while governing efforts to improve mortality and living conditions. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  21. 21
    070165

    Philippines.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume III. Oman to Zimbabwe, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 26-9. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.2; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.2)

    The Philippines' 1985 population of 55,120,000 is projected to grow to 111,393,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 41.1% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 5.2% were over the age of 60. 24.9% and 10.6% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 27.1 to 11.3 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 61.9 to 72.7 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 8.5 to 6.1, while infant mortality will decline from 51.0 to 17.0. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 4.7 to 2.1, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 35.6 to 17.4. The 1986 contraceptive prevalence rate was 45.3, while the 1980 female mean age at 1st marriage was 22.4 years. Urban population will increase from 29.6% in 1985 to 66.1% overall by the year 2025. Immigration is considered to be acceptable by the government, while population growth, mortality, morbidity, fertility, emigration, and spatial distribution are not. The Philippines has an explicit population policy. A decentralized population program was adopted in 1988, stressing the importance of family and family welfare, responsible parenthood, the reduction of fertility, and the integration of population factors within development planning. Improving population health, providing primary health care, adjusting patterns of spatial distribution, and bolstering the overall quality of life for all are major policy objectives. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  22. 22
    070164

    Peru.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume III. Oman to Zimbabwe, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 22-5. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.2; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.2)

    Peru's 1985 population of 19,698,000 is projected to grow to 41,006,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 40.5% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 5.6% were over the age of 60. 25.2% and 11.5% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 26.0 to 11.8 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 58.6 to 72.0 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 10.7 to 6.4, while infant mortality will decline from 99.0 to 47.0. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 5.0 to 2.3, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 36.7 to 18.2. The 1986 contraceptive prevalence rate was 45.8, while the 1981 female mean age at 1st marriage was 22.7 years. Urban population will increase from 67.4% in 1985 to 84.0% overall by the year 2025. Immigration and emigration are considered to be acceptable by the government, while population growth, mortality, fertility, and spatial distribution are not. Peru has an explicit population policy. The 1985 National Population and socioeconomic development, responsible parenthood, significant reductions in morbidity and mortality, and improved spatial distribution of the population. Greater efforts have been made since 1986 to reduce the fertility rate. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  23. 23
    070163

    Paraguay.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume III. Oman to Zimbabwe, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 18-21. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.2; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.2)

    Paraguay's 1985 population of 3,693,0000 is projected to grow to 9,182,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 41.0% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 5.4% were over the age of 60. 31.3% and 9.3% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 29.0 to 17.2 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 66.4 to 69.6 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 6.7 to 6.6, while infant mortality will decline from 45.0 to 24.0. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 4.8 to 3.1, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 35.8 to 23.9. The 1987 contraceptive prevalence rate was 44.8, while the 1982 female mean age at 1st marriage was 21.8 years. Urban population will increase from 44.4% in 1985 to 69.7% overall by the year 2025. Population growth, mortality, morbidity, fertility, and emigration are considered to be acceptable by the government, while immigration and spatial distribution are not. Paraguay does not have an explicit population policy. Expansion of the domestic market through population growth is considered positive for the nation's development. Population-related policy, therefore, attempts to modify only population distribution and internal migration. Greater programmatic and policy emphasis is placed upon improving overall population welfare through better health, income distribution, education, and employment. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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