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Your search found 6 Results

  1. 1
    070203

    Thailand.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume III. Oman to Zimbabwe, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 142-5. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.2; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.2)

    Thailand;s 1985 population of 51,604,000 is projected to grow to 80,911,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 36.5% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 5.6% were over the age of 60. 21.0% and 15.5% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 19.9 to 7.0 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 62.7 to 74.6 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 8.0 to 7.4, while infant mortality will decline from 48.0 to 13.0. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 3.5 to 2.1, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 27.8 to 14.4. The 1987 contraceptive prevalence rate was 65.5, while the 1980 female mean age at 1st marriage was 22.7 years. Urban population will increase from 19.8% in 1985 to 49.2% overall by the year 2025. Insignificant international migration is considered to be acceptable by the government, while high population growth, mortality, morbidity, fertility, and spatial distribution are not. Thailand has an explicit population policy. Encouraging the voluntary acceptance of family planning and the notion of a small family ideal, policy supports a reduction in the rate of population growth. Health and socioeconomic objectives as well as a balanced population distribution are also included as well as balanced population distribution are also included under the rubric of population policy. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  2. 2
    070185

    Sri Lanka.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume III. Oman to Zimbabwe, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 114-7. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.2; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.2)

    Sri Lanka's 1985 population of 16,108,000 is projected to grown to 24,449,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 34.1% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 71.1% were over the age of 60. 21.6% and 17.2% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 20.5 to 7.5 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 68.9 to 77.2 years, the crude death rate will increase from 6.3 to 7.2, while infant mortality will decline from 39.0 to 13.0. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 3.3 to 2.1, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 26.9 to 14.7. The 1987 contraceptive prevalence rate was 62.0, while the 1981 female mean age at 1st marriage was 24.4 years. Urban population will increase from 21.1% n 1985 to 42.6% overall by he year 2025. Insignificant levels of international migration and spatial distribution are considered to be acceptable by the government, while high population growth, mortality, morbidity, and fertility are not. Sri Lanka has an explicit population policy. It aims to reduce population growth and adjust the age structure by lowering fertility and infant and child mortality. Strengthened and expanded family planning services, financial incentives for women using IUDs, and population education are components of this approach. Population policy as it related to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  3. 3
    070180

    Singapore.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume III. Oman to Zimbabwe, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 94-7. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.2; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.2)

    Singapore's 1985 population of 2,559,000 is projected to grown to 3,239,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 24.5% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 7.7% were over the age of 60. 16.6% and 27.0% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 11.6 to 1.2 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 71.8 to 1.2 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 71.8 to 78.3 years, the crude death rate will increase from 5.4 to 9.8, while infant mortality will decline from 10.0 to 5.0. The fertility rate will rise over the period from 1.7 to 1.8, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 17.0 to 11.0. The 1982 contraceptive prevalence rate was 74.2, while the 1980 female mean age at 1st marriage was 26.2 years. Population growth, mortality, morbidity, and insignificant international migration are considered to be acceptable by the government, while low fertility is not. Singapore has an explicit population policy. Higher fertility is desired, especially among more educated women. Accordingly, as of 1985, the government abandoned its 2-child family policy in favor of a new program offering incentives for couples to have at least 3 children. Higher fertility is encouraged for the entire population. Complementary programs promote social and economic advancement. Population policy as it related to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  4. 4
    070169

    Republic of Korea.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume III. Oman to Zimbabwe, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 42-5. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.2; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.2)

    The republic of Korea's 1985 population of 41,056,000 is projected to grow to 54,627,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 30.0% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 6.8% were over the age of 60. 17.5% and 20.7% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 15.0 to 2.7 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 67.7 to 76.6 years, the crude death rate will increase from 6.3 to 8.9, while infant mortality will decline from 30.0 to 8.0. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 2.4 to 1.8, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 21.3 to 11.6. The 1988 contraceptive prevalence rate was 77.0, while the 1980 female mean age at 1st marriage was 24.1 years. Urban population will increase from 65.3% in 1985 to 87.9% overall by the year 2025. Fertility, international migration, and spatial distribution are considered to be acceptable by the government, while population growth and mortality are not. The Republic of Korea has an explicit population policy. It is aimed primarily at reducing population growth, yet also extends to more broad welfare-oriented policy, spatial distribution, improving social equity and the status of women, and securing the welfare of the aged. While success has been met from efforts to modify fertility and mortality, family planning efforts have been bolstered with hopes of gaining further reductions in fertility. Population policy as it related to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  5. 5
    070165

    Philippines.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume III. Oman to Zimbabwe, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 26-9. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.2; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.2)

    The Philippines' 1985 population of 55,120,000 is projected to grow to 111,393,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 41.1% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 5.2% were over the age of 60. 24.9% and 10.6% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 27.1 to 11.3 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 61.9 to 72.7 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 8.5 to 6.1, while infant mortality will decline from 51.0 to 17.0. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 4.7 to 2.1, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 35.6 to 17.4. The 1986 contraceptive prevalence rate was 45.3, while the 1980 female mean age at 1st marriage was 22.4 years. Urban population will increase from 29.6% in 1985 to 66.1% overall by the year 2025. Immigration is considered to be acceptable by the government, while population growth, mortality, morbidity, fertility, emigration, and spatial distribution are not. The Philippines has an explicit population policy. A decentralized population program was adopted in 1988, stressing the importance of family and family welfare, responsible parenthood, the reduction of fertility, and the integration of population factors within development planning. Improving population health, providing primary health care, adjusting patterns of spatial distribution, and bolstering the overall quality of life for all are major policy objectives. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  6. 6
    272522

    Development finance institutions: a discussion of donor experience.

    McKean CS

    Washington, D.C., United States Agency for International Development, 1990 Jul. x, 21 p. (A.I.D. Program Evaluation Discussion Paper No. 31)

    This report examines the critical issues involved in continued donor support for development finance institutions (DFI) based on a review of donor experience and explores the effectiveness of DFI as "intermediaries for targeting credit to priority sectors, the long-term sustainability of DFI in developing countries and the contribution of DFI to the development of financial markets." The key question is whether DFI can mobilize local resources and supply long-term credit to priority groups in developing countries. This report is based on the work of the Development Assistance Committee (DAC) of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development which established an Expert Group on AID Evaluation representing 9 major donors and covering the period from 1975 to the late 1980's. Despite several examples of DFI programs positively affecting credit availability and private sector growth (Korea, Pakistan, Costa Rica, Indonesia, and Tanzania) the consensus was the DFI reach very few target groups because of: 1) eligibility requirements to get credit; 2) transaction costs of credit; and 3) interest rates charged to sub-borrowers. DFI have not become sustainable intermediaries because of poor financial performance due to: 1) the inability of DFI to mobilize domestic savings and to operate as "full-fledged" financial institutions; 2) restrictions and prohibitions (interest rate ceilings and legal/contractual prohibitions) making them specialized as opposed to a decentralized operation; and 3) a management capability that cannot compete in a "complex economic environment." Lastly, DFI have been unable to contribute to financial market developments in developing countries due to financial policy measures limiting DFI from offering new financial services. Changes should be directed at donors that could increase the efficiency and performance of DFI in the future.
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