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  1. 1
    791259

    Thailand: report of mission on needs assessment for population assistance.

    United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA]

    New York, UNFPA, June 1979. (Report No. 13) 151 p

    This report is intended to serve, and has already to some extent so served, as part of the background material used by the United Nations Fund for Population Activities to evaluate project proposals as they relate to basic country needs for population assistance to Thailand, and in broader terms to define priorities of need in working towards eventual self-reliance in implementing the country's population activities. The function of the study is to determine the extent to which activities in the field of population provide Thailand with the fundamental capacity to deal with major population problems in accordance with its development policies. The assessment of population activities in Thailand involves a 3-fold approach. The main body of the report examines 7 categories of population activities rather broadly in the context of 10 elements considered to reflect effect ve government action. The 7 categories of population activities are: 1) basic data collection; 2) population dynamics; 3) formulation and evaluation of population policies and programs; 4) implementation of policies; 5) family planning programs; 6) communication a and education; and 7) special programs. The 10 elements comprise: 1) decennial census of population, housing, and agriculture; 2) an effective registration system; 3) assessment of the implications of population trends; 4) formulation of a comprehensive national population policy; 5) implementation of action programs integrated with related programs of economic and social development; 6) continued reduction in the population growth rate; 7) effective utilization of the services of private and voluntary organizations in action programs; 8) a central administrative unit to coordinate action programs; 9) evaluation of the national capacity in technical training, research, and production of equipment and supplies; and 10) maintenance of continuing liason and cooperation with other countries and with regional and international organizations.
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  2. 2
    791361
    Peer Reviewed

    Primary health care and developing countries.

    BENNETT FJ

    Social Science and Medicine. 1979 Aug; 13A(5):505-514.

    The focal point of Primary Health Care (PHC) is the community. PHC represents a natural outcome of a political ideology implying that health service is not something to be delivered to the people from above; with the high cost technology teaching hospital as the center of medical universe. But rather, PHC is a concept of health services generated within the community and linking up with a referral system; and it is firmly established as the avenue which most developing countries will explore in the next 20 years. This commitment is largely the result of the Alma-Ata Conference which clarified many of the political; technical; social; administrative and educational aspects of PHC. This paper summarizes this process of consolidation of the concept; gives more examples of national plans in Sudan, Tanzania, Ghana, and India; and then deals with types of support that facilitate community participation. Because PHC involves people rather than merely technology, the role of social scientists is one which needs greater emphasis.
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