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  1. 1
    309816

    A toolkit for Pacific youth: localising the MDGs.

    Seeto C; Morioka K; Singh R; Jayaweera S; Viskisha

    [Sydney], Australia, Youth for a Sustainable Future Pacifika, 2006. [19] p.

    The Millennium Development Goals, better known as the MDGs, are a set of goals committed to reducing poverty, illiteracy, inequality and disease in developing countries. In September 2000, leaders from 189 nations including 14 Pacific Island nations, agreed to achieve the MDGs by endorsing the Millennium Declaration. The Declaration is a special documentation because it specifies responsibility for all countries to enhance the global agenda on human development. This means that even developed countries like the United States, Australia and New Zealand, are responsible for assisting developing countries in meeting the goals. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    300194

    The Millennium Development Goals report 2005.

    United Nations

    New York, New York, United Nations, 2005. [46] p.

    Global poverty rates are falling, led by Asia. But millions more people have sunk deep into poverty in sub-Saharan Africa, where the poor are getting poorer. Progress has been made against hunger, but slow growth of agricultural output and expanding populations have led to setbacks in some regions. Since 1990, millions more people are chronically hungry in sub-Saharan Africa and in Southern Asia, where half the children under age 5 are malnourished. Five developing regions are approaching universal enrolment. But in sub-Saharan Africa, fewer than two thirds of children are enrolled in primary school. Other regions, including Southern Asia and Oceania, also have a long way to go. In these regions and elsewhere, increased enrolment must be accompanied by efforts to ensure that all children remain in school and receive a high-quality education. The gender gap is closing — albeit slowly — in primary school enrolment in the developing world. This is a first step towards easing long-standing inequalities between women and men. In almost all developing regions, women represent a smaller share of wage earners than men and are often relegated to insecure and poorly paid jobs. Though progress is being made, women still lack equal representation at the highest levels of government, holding only 16 per cent of parliamentary seats worldwide. (excerpt)
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