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  1. 1
    296459

    Population conference set for 1994; ageing, international migration examined - International Conference on Population and Development.

    UN Chronicle. 1991 Jun; 28(2):[4] p..

    Dr. Nafis Sadik, Executive Director of the UN Population Fund and Secretary-General of the Conference, said preparations for the event reflected the enormous needs and challenges of the future, as well as the notable advances that had been made in the population field, particularly by developing countries in implementing policies and programmes. Egypt and Tunisia both have offered to host the Conference, scheduled for August 1994. Further preparatory meetings are planned in August 1993 and early 1994. It would be the fifth international population conference convened by the UN. Conferences held in Rome in 1954 and in Belgrade in 1965 were purely technical meetings, limited to scientific discussions on population topics. Subsequent intergovernmental conferences in Bucharest in 1974 and in Mexico City in 1984 were concerned with establishing objectives, principles and goals, and making recommendations in the population field. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    075142

    Report: Second Conference of Asian Forum of Parliamentarians on Population and Development, 23-25 September 1987, Beijing, China.

    Conference of Asian Forum of Parliamentarians on Population and Development (2nd: 1987: Beijing)

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], 1987. [3], 72 p.

    The formal proceedings of the 1987 Asian (AFPPD) Conference of Parliamentarians on Population and Development (FPPD) are provided in some detail. 23 countries participated. The Asian Forum Beijing Declaration preamble, program of action, call to action, and rededication are presented. Background information indicates that these conferences have been ongoing since 1984 to exchange information and experience, to promote cooperation, and to sustain involvement of Parliamentarians in population and development issues. Official delegations represented Australia, Bangladesh, China, Korea, India, Iraq, Japan, Malaysia, Maldives, Mongolia, Nepal, Pakistan, Philippines, north and south Korea, Sri Lanka, Syria, Thailand, and Vietnam. Observers were from Bhutan, Cyprus, Indonesia, Kiribati, and Tonga. The UN Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA) was involved as Conference Secretariat as well as the Preparatory Committee of China. Other UN and nongovernmental organizations and Parliamentary Councils of the World, Africa, and Europe were involved. Summaries were made of opening conference addresses of Mr. Takashi Sato, Mr. Zhou Gucheng, Chinese Premier Zhao Zivang, Japanese Prime Minister Takeo Fukuda, Dr. Nafis Sadik from the UNFPA, Mrs. Rahman Othman for Mr. Sat Paul Mittal of AFPPD, Australian Prime Minister R.J.L. Hawke, India Prime Minister Rajiv Ghandi, Sri Lankan Prime Minister R. Premedasa, Philippine President Corazon Aquino, Pakistan President Mohammad Zia-ul-Hag, and Bangladesh President Hussain Muhammad Ershad. Election of officers was discussed. The plenary sessions reported on the present situation and prospects for Asian population and development, basic health services and family planning (FP), urbanization, population and food, and aging. Reports were also provided of an exchange among Parliamentarians, the adoption of conference documents and the AFPPD constitution, election of officers, and the closing speakers. Appendices provide a complete list of participants, the constitution which was adopted, and the addresses of Mr. Zhou Gucheng from China's National People's Congress; Mr. Zhao Ziyang, Premier of the State Council of the People's Republic of China; Mr. Takeo Fukuda of the Global Committee of FPPD, Dr. Nafis Sadik, Executive Director, UNFPA; and Mr. Sat Paul Mittal, Secretary General, AFPPD.
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  3. 3
    142045

    Statement: Japan.

    Honda H

    [Unpublished] 1999. Presented at the United Nations Commission on Population and Development, Thirty-second session, New York, New York, March 22-31, 1999 3 p.

    This is a statement delivered by the Ambassador of the Multilateral Cooperation Department of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan at the Thirty-second Session of the UN Commission on Population and Development. It focuses on population growth, structure, and distribution in Japan. The population of Japan increased rapidly shortly after World War II, but population growth was slowed through various efforts made by both the government and the private sector. The population has expanded during the 20th century at an average annual rate of 830 thousand people and is expected to decrease in the 21st century at an average annual rate of 60 thousand people. As to its population structure, Japan's long-term low fertility has resulted in a decline in its working-age population and a corresponding decline in the size of its national labor force. Japan is dealing with two vital issues, namely: 1) ensuring that it has an adequate working population and 2) ensuring that it is able to give adequate support to its elderly citizens. Supporting measures for elderly people are being discussed; these include pensions, medical care, and long-term care. Other measures are being considered for easing the most important concerns associated with aging and realizing a society devoted to human welfare and longevity. In addition, Japan is taking steps to institute a public insurance system to guarantee elderly care by the year 2000. As to the issue of population distribution, the Ambassador states that the population is concentrated in the metropolitan areas of Tokyo, Osaka, and Nagoya. This excessive concentration of both population and industry has produced various problems in the urban centers and has led to the depopulation of rural communities. Regional Development Plans have been implemented for solving these problems.
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  4. 4
    267120

    Population and global future, statement made at the First Global Conference on the Future: through the '80s, Toronto, Canada, 21 July 1980.

    Salas RM

    New York, N.Y., UNFPA, [1980]. 6 p. (Speech Series No. 57)

    The United Nations has always considered population variables to be an integral part of the total development process. UNFPA has developed, in response to national needs, a core program of population assistance which has found universal support and acceptance among the 130 recipient countries and territories. Historically, these are: family planning, population policy formulation and population dynamics. The following emerging trends are foreseeable from country requests and information available to the Fund: 1) migration from rural to urban areas and increased growth in urbanization; 2) an increased proportion of aged which has already created a number of new demands for resources in both developing and developed countries; 3) a move toward enabling women to participate in economic and educational activities; and 4) a need for urgent concern over ecological issues which affect the delicate balance of resources and population.
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  5. 5
    267114

    The food, population and development equation, statement made at Southeastern Dialogue on the Changing World Economy, Atlanta, Georgia, 25 October 1980.

    Salas RM

    New York, N.Y., UNFPA, [1980]. 8 p.

    The 1st type of assistance asked for from developing countries is the collection of basic data. The 2nd type of program is family planning. Countries must formulate their family planning themselves based on assessment of needs. The 3rd area that has evolved is that of population dynamics--the study of demographic variables and their consequences. The 4th area is the field of communication and education to support family planning and population programs. The 5th area is in population policies. Finally, there is the residual category of special activities concerned with youth, women and the aged. Population, therefore, represents a broad core area of 5 to 6 categories. The UNFPA is a voluntary organization which provides assistance only to developing countries. The projections of the UN indicate that, as a result of efforts in population, there is for the 1st time in the history of mankind a decline in the population growth rate of developing countries. Nevertheless, mankind must be prepared for an additional 2 billion people by the turn of the century. Population efforts in the end must aim at the stabilization of total world numbers to enable individuals to develop to their full capacity and to improve the quality of life for all.
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  6. 6
    267113

    Population and development: the challenges for the future, statement made at the International Conference of Parliamentarians on Population and Development, Colombo, Sri Lanka, 28 August, 1979.

    Salas RM

    New York, N.Y., UNFPA, [1979]. 14 p.

    In the challenges faced by national policy makers and technical experts there is a vital linkage between population programs, policies and plans on health, housing, education, employment, the environment, and the uses of resources. The ultimate end of population programs should be assisting in the creation of societies which will enable individuals to develop their full potential. Reasons for the overall decline in fertility are not fully understood. It is not known which programs need to be sustained or modified to help the momentum continue. Can the reduction in infant mortality rate to less than 120/1000 live births by 1985 be attained? Regarding migration, the problem of how countries can institute action towards a more balanced redistribution of population within their natural boundaries exists. An increase in the population of the aged will require shifts in resources to welfare systems tailored to the needs of this population group. Consideration for human rights stresses the need for population programs implemented without coercion. There is also a need for better contraceptives. Population studies indicate that increasing participation of women in economic activities has decisive effects on decreasing reproductive rates. It is not only necessary to take into account the resources required to feed, clothe and shelter a growing population, but also the type of technology which will make this possible without worsening the environment. Regarding data collection and institutional development, there is a continuous need to strengthen the data base as well as the various types of governmental and community machinery for planning, promoting and coordinating population activities with development policies in developing countries. Large increases in demand for assistance from all parts of the developing world, particularly Asia and Africa, are foreseen. Present flow must increase to US$1 billion annually to meet this demand. Parliamentarians must demonstrate a strong commitment to action. There may be a need to transform the solid institutions of our society for more peace and security. One of the principal threats to peace is social unrest caused by the accumulation of human fear and hopelessness.
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  7. 7
    272980

    A neglected area in the field of population and human rights: aging and the aged.

    World Assembly on Aging

    In: United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population and human rights: proceedings of the Symposium on Population and Human Rights, Vienna, 29 June-3 July 1981. New York, New York, United Nations, 1983. 102-9.

    Until 1948, only a few developed countries had been concerned with aging as an issue. However, this situation is currently changing, and it is expected to change considerably in the near future, since both the number and proportion of the aged in the population are projected to increase a great deal. This is an unprecedented situation for many developing countries, and appropriate responses have yet to be developed. It is in this context that the Secretary-General of the UN prepared for the World Assembly on Aging held in July 1982 a draft program and suggested that there should be a declaration on the rights of the aged. 2 kinds of issues have been identified; 1) humanitarian issues such as health, housing environment, social welfare, income security, education, and the family, and 2) developmental issues. From the humanitarian point of view, it is the individual rights of the aged that are most identifiable; e.g., the rights to assistance, accommodation, food, clothing, care of physical and moral health, recreation, work, stability, and respect. 2 demographic aspects need to be considered: 1) because of differentials in mortality, in many countries the aged group is composed of a majority of women; and 2) the aged can be disabled to some extent or for certain periods during their later years. This gives rise to the question of special rights for the aged. With the increase in the numbers and proportions of the aged, their rights have direct implication for development--cost can be a limiting factor in the exercise of a right. 1 of the objectives derived from the principles of the Declaratin on Social Progress and Development is "the establishment and improvement of social security and insurance schemes for all persons who, because of illness, disability, or old age, are temporarily or permanently unable to earn a living..." Thus human rights have an important role to play in ensuring that the aged remain active participants and enjoy their contribution to development.
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