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    030034

    Donors and developers in population communication.

    Echols JR

    Honolulu, Hawaii, East-West Center, East-West Communication Institute, 1977 Apr. ix, 88 p. (A Synthesis of Population Communication Experience Paper 9)

    Reviewing technical and economic assistance in the field of population and family planning communication, this document traces the development of population-related assistance programs and describes the kinds of assistance available from the major donor agencies and technical assistance institutions for population and family planning communication. It discusses problems and issues of technical and economic assustance such as the impact of external funding on national goals and policies; the relationships between outside experts and national personnel; the cultural variations that support or hinder programs of technical assistance; and coordination among donors, action agencies, and national governments. This review establishes that a population communication program is only 1 factor in the changing of attitudes about family size and motivating people to practice contraception, thus bringing about a reduction in fertility. Economic, technical, and social development alone can bring about these changes. In most cases, it is general, technical, and economic assistance that really helps in the development process. Specific technical and economic assistance to population programs can help to bring about the practice of contraception and thus, reduced fertility. That part of population assistance used for communication programs can help change attitudes and increase motivation to bring about these ends. Another element that emerges from this review is that the development process and population control would take place more easily if equal resources had been available internally rather than through the complicating mechanism of external assistance. Yet, less developed countries, with the possible exception of China, have been unable to carry out either of these processes without outside assistance. The role of motivational programs remains clear. Without adequate information and education about the problems created by large families and a growing population, there is no evidence that the traditional family in LDCs will choose to have fewer children. The role of national governments in these countries is also clear. They need to develop successful population programs with clear communication programs and good delivery systems as part of their total development program. Developed nations must be prepared to assist in the manner and according to the timetable of the LDCs. Technical and economic assistance to LDCs must be geared to their population programs and their messages using the best techniques and most fluid funding processes available.
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