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  1. 1
    274440

    Effective prevention strategies in low HIV prevalence settings.

    Brown T; Franklin B; MacNeil J; Mills S

    Arlington, Virginia, Family Health International [FHI], HIV / AIDS Prevention and Care Department, 2001. [41] p. (UNAID Best Practice Key Materials; USAID Cooperative Agreement No. HRN-A-00-97-00017-00)

    Countries with low HIV prevalence share a set of concerns and challenges regarding their responses to a potential HIV epidemic. Many of these countries also present an opportunity to avert large numbers of future HIV infections if appropriate prevention strategies are chosen and implemented early, greatly reducing future HIV/AIDS-related costs to the country. The purpose of this publication is to identify those challenges and propose a prevention strategy that can maintain low HIV prevalence in the general population, while reducing existing or preventing potential HIV sub-epidemics in population subgroups with substantial levels of risk behavior. Decisions on the strategic placement and targeting of prevention interventions are important to both international agencies and countries planning their prevention response. Both need to make difficult choices regarding geographic and population subgroups to ensure that resources are allocated efficiently. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    181170

    AIDS and the military. UNAIDS point of view.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 1998 May. 8 p. (UNAIDS Best Practice Collection)

    Military personnel are a population group at special risk of exposure to sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), including HIV. In peace time, STD infection rates among armed forces are generally 2 to 5 times higher than in civilian populations; in time of conflict the difference can be 50 times higher or more. Paradoxically -- and fortunately -- strong traditions of organization and discipline give the military significant advantages if they move decisively against HIV/AIDS. (excerpt)
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