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Your search found 3 Results

  1. 1
    308077
    Peer Reviewed

    The World Health Organization multinational study of breast-feeding and lactational amenorrhea. II. Factors associated with the length of amenorrhea.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Task Force on Methods for the Natural Regulation of Fertility

    Fertility and Sterility. 1998 Sep; 70(3):461-471.

    The objective was to determine the relation between infant feeding practices (and other factors) and the duration of postpartum amenorrhea, and to establish whether there are real differences in the duration of postpartum amenorrhea for similar breast-feeding practices in different populations. Design: Prospective, nonexperimental, longitudinal follow-up study. Setting: Five developing and two developed countries. Patient(s): Four thousand one hundred eighteen breast-feeding mothers and their infants. Breast-feeding women collected ongoing information about infant feeding and family planning practices, plus the return of menses. Fortnightly follow-up occurred in the women's homes. A multivariate analysis explored the association between the risk of menses return and 16 infant feeding variables and 11 other characteristics. Ten factors (in addition to center effects) were significantly related to the duration of amenorrhea. Seven of these were infant feeding characteristics and the remaining three were high parity, low body mass index, and a higher frequency of infant illness. The breast-feeding stimulus is strongly linked to the duration of postpartum amenorrhea. Cross-cultural effects also are extremely important and may have caused the variations in feeding, the variation in amenorrhea, or both. (author's)
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  2. 2
    144473
    Peer Reviewed

    The World Health Organization multinational study of breast-feeding and lactational amenorrhea. IV. Postpartum bleeding and lochia in breast-feeding women.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction. Task Force on Methods for the Natural Regulation of Fertility

    FERTILITY AND STERILITY.. 1999 Sep; 72(3):441-7.

    The main purpose of this study was to compare the duration of postpartum lochia among 7 groups of breast-feeding women, and in addition, to investigate whether age, parity, birth weight, or the amount of breast-feeding affects this duration. The participants included 4118 breast-feeding women aged 20-37 years living in China, Guatemala, Australia, India, Nigeria, Chile, or Sweden. The duration of lochia, frequency of an end-of-puerperium bleeding episode, and frequency of post-lochia bleeding episodes within 56 days of delivery were measured. This study revealed that the median duration of lochia was 27 days and varied significantly among the centers (range, 22-34 days). In about 11% of the women, lochia lasted >40 days. An end-of-puerperium bleeding episode around the 40th day postpartum was reported by 20.3% of the women. Bleeding within 56 days of delivery (separated from lochia by at least 14 days) occurred in 11.3% of the women and usually was followed by a confirmatory bleeding episode 21-70 days later. This study was able to quantify the average duration of postpartum lochia at 3-5 weeks, with significant variations by population. Lochia durations of >40 days were not unusual. A separate and distinct end-of-puerperium bleeding episode occurred in 1 out of every 4-5 women, although it is unclear how this phenomenon is clinically, socially, or culturally significant.
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  3. 3
    144472
    Peer Reviewed

    The World Health Organization multinational study of breast-feeding and lactational amenorrhea. III. Pregnancy during breast-feeding.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction. Task Force on Methods for the Natural Regulation of Fertility

    FERTILITY AND STERILITY.. 1999 Sep; 72(3):431-40.

    This prospective longitudinal study aimed to determine the risk of pregnancy during lactational amenorrhea relative to infant feeding status. The participants included 4118 breast-feeding mother-infant pairs, with maternal age of 20-37 years, recruited from 7 study centers located in China, Guatemala, Australia, India, Nigeria, Chile, and Sweden. Infant feeding practices, menstrual status, and the number of pregnancies were recorded. The results revealed that in the first 6 months after childbirth, cumulative pregnancy rate during amenorrhea, depending on how the end of amenorrhea was defined, ranged from 0.9% (95% confidential interval (CI) = 0-2%) to 1.2% (95% CI = 0-2.4%) during full breast-feeding, and from 0.7% (95% CI = 0.1-1.3%) to 0.8% (95% CI = 0.2-1.4%) up to the end of partial breast-feeding. At 12 months, the rates ranged from 6.6% (95% CI = 1.9-11.2%) to 7.4% (95% CI = 2.5-12.3%) during full breast-feeding, and from 3.7% (95% CI = 1.9-5.5%) to 5.2% (95% CI = 3.1-7.4%) up to the end of partial breast-feeding. Regardless of the degree of supplementation, the pregnancy rate increased with time from 6th to the 12th month postpartum. Overall, the rate of pregnancy during amenorrhea was unaffected by variations in the return of menses. This large, multicenter study found that the cumulative 6-month rate of pregnancy during lactational amenorrhea was between 0.8% (95% CI = 0-1.4%) and 1.2% (95% CI = 0-2.4%). This is equivalent to the protection provided by many nonpermanent contraceptive methods as they are actually used and upholds the 1988 Bellagio Consensus.
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