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Your search found 11 Results

  1. 1
    273137

    Status of family planning activities and involvement of international agencies in the Caribbean region [chart].

    Pan American Health Organization

    [Unpublished] 1970. 1 p.

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  2. 2
    058858

    Annual report 1988-1989.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]

    London, England, IPPF, 1989. 33 p.

    In 1952 in Bombay, India, the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) was founded at a conference with delegates from 8 nations. By the end of 1988, 104 members and 2 affiliations made up IPPF and it was providing family planning assistance to >130 countries. Data has confirmed that child spacing, be it through modern contraceptive practices or traditional means, improves the health of both mother and child. These data support what IPPF and the family planning movement have been advocating for decades. To further promote better health through family planning, IPPF has renewed its commitment to work together with its donors, among its members, and other agencies. For example, in 1988, the Kenyan Family Planning Association (KFPA) helped support a soil protection project of a local women's group. The KFPA offered the women family planning services and operated an immunization program. In September 1988, staff and volunteers determined what programs were needed to reach IPPF's goal: 450 million couples worldwide will be using modern contraception by 2000. They also outlined 3 basic principles for IPPF's work: the individual and couple's right to control their own fertility; the opportunity to plan a family contributes greatly to mental and physical health; and the need to maintain a balance between natural resources and population. Also this group identified Africa as the region in most need of IPPF family planning assistance. In Africa, youth projects highlighting adolescent pregnancy and AIDS education have been targeted. During 1988-1989, IPPF continued active support for the remaining regions. As of 1988-1989, USAID had not renewed the financial support it withdrew in 1985. In April 1989, Dr. Halfdan Mahler, who was the Director-General of WHO for 15 years, replaced Mr. Bradman Weerakon as IPPF's Secretary-General.
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  3. 3
    049276

    Dominican Republic: Contraceptive Social Marketing Project.

    Futures Group. Social Marketing for Change [SOMARC]

    [Unpublished] 1987 Jun. [6] p.

    To increase knowledge and proper use of low-dose oral contraceptives and increase availability of affordable contraception for low-income populations in the Dominican Republic, Profamilia (an IPPF affiliate) launched a communications/promotional campaign for Microgynon aimed at men and women under age 35. While strengthening Profamilia's marketing and organizational capabilities so that the program could be maintained without donor subsidies, the Profamilia name was used to communicate the idea of quality at low price. The message that Microgynon is a safe, effective, easily used, temporary method of birth control was relayed through a television commercial aired in 1986; through press releases; on display posters, stickers, matchbooks, memo pads, and bag inserts distributed to pharmacies; by educational/promotional meetings with the medical community; and by orientation sessions with pharmacy employees. Schering Dominica's sales network placed Microgynon in 83% of pharmacies in the Dominican Republic. It was priced significantly below comparable products. Of 500 randomly selected residents, 68% remembered seeing the television commercial. In interviews with 252 Microgynon purchasers, 65% said that they had started using Microgynon after the television advertising campaign. The campaign was successful in reaching the target group of women.
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  4. 4
    048989

    Contraceptive prevalence in St. Kitts-Nevis.

    Jagdeo TP

    New York, New York, International Planned Parenthood Federation, Western Hemisphere Region, 1985. xi, 102, 24 p. (IPPF/WHR Caribbean Contraceptive Prevalence Surveys)

    An analysis of Caribbean contraceptive prevalence surveys is the focus of this report by the IPPF, Western Hemisphere Region, through its Caribbean Population and Development project. This booklet reports on 1 aspect of the project--the analysis of contraceptive surveys conducted in St. Kitts-Nevis and Montserrat to determine levels of contraceptive use and assess the effectiveness of information, education, and delivery services. Chapter 1 outlines the background, economic, social, and family structures, and organization of family planning services in St. Kitts-Nevis. The methodology of the survey is explained. Chapter 2 provides a demographic analysis of fertility, parity, and unplanned pregnancy rates. The level of awareness of contraceptives and contraceptive outlets is presented in Chapter 3. Patterns of contraceptive use, with user and non-user profiles, preferred sources for contraceptive outlets, user satisfaction with methods and outlets, male involvement in family planning, and the timing of contraceptive use are the topics covered in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 provides an overview of contraceptive use, family planning programs, and sense of self-worth in St. Kitts-Nevis. Social sources of resistance to contraceptive use and the contraceptive intentions of non-acceptors are characterized in Chapter 6. Chapter 7 offers a summary and conclusions of the study findings, and the 1984 contraceptive prevalence survey used in St. Kitts-Nevis is supplied in the appendix.
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  5. 5
    201473

    The role of the International Planned Parenthood Federation in setting international medical standards.

    Senanayake P

    In: Recent advances in fertility control: proceedings of the 1st International Symposium on Recent Advances in Fertility Control, Tokyo, November 8, 1986. Edited by Seiichi Matsumoto. Amsterdam, the Netherlands, Excerpta Medica, 1987. 83-91. (Current Clinical Practice Series No. 45.)

    This chapter discusses 6 key areas that illustrate how the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) addresses its role and responsibilities. These areas include: 1) IPPF's size and scope of activities, 2) the Federation's role in setting and maintaining medical standards, 3) the work of the IPPF International Medical Advisory Panel, 4) IPPF's work with international organizations, 5) how the Federation tackles double standards in the quality of medical care around the world, and 6) sharing experience in family planning expertise worldwide. Brief summaries of information presented in these areas follow. 1) The IPPF is the world's leading voluntary family planning organization. It was founded in 1952 and has member associations in 123 countries; in the 1985, the IPPF reached approximately 5 million contraceptive acceptors around the world. 2) IPPF recognizes the critical importance of establishing and implementing internationally acceptable medical standards for family planning programs around the world. In places where there is opposition to family planning, critics can often be effectively silenced when programs can be seen to adhere to acceptable standards of practice. 3) The International Medical Advisory Panel is a small group of internationally renowned experts in family planning and contraceptive technology. The panel meets regularly, reviews the latest medical literature, and advises the Federation on the safety, effectiveness, and acceptability of contraceptive methods. 4) IPPF collaborates with a number of international organizations and sets standards for program activity in the areas of adolescent reproductive health and maternal and child health care. Another key area of collaboration is in seeking to ensure that family planning is incorporated into primary health care programs throughout the world. 5) IPPF is working to eradicate double standards in medical issues worldwide. Critics alleging the existence of double standards sometimes pass judgment on health standards in developing countries without realizing the impossibility of replicating the health care practices of countries with pharmacies and medical personnel available to all member of the population, at prices they can afford. 6) IPPF's history of successfully delivering family planning services has encouraged and increased the need to find ways of replicating them. An important part of IPPF's mechanism for sharing experiences and family planning expertise is through its active publications program. IPPF also has innovative projects working with young people, in encouraging male involvement in family planning, and in extending planned parenthood and women's development projects. (author's)
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  6. 6
    045167

    Sterilizations by sex and percentages of: male to female sterilizations and total number of sterilizations as percentage of total new acceptors. 1979-1984.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]. Western Hemisphere Region [WHR]

    [Unpublished] [1986]. 3 p.

    This is an International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) collection of data detailing numbers of sterilizations in each country of the western hemisphere from 1979 to 1985. The table presents sterilizations among males and females, total number of sterilizations, ratio of male to female expressed in percentages, and ratio of sterilizations to new acceptors also expressed as percentages. The countries with the numbers over 10,000 in 1986 were Columbia, Guatemala and the Dominican Republic. Countries with 1000 to 9999 were U.S., Honduras, Mexico, El Salvador, Ecuador and Brazil, in order. Most nations reported 5 to 10 times more female than male sterilizations. The exception was the U.S., with 10 times more vasectomies in the latter years. The total reported ranged from 63,400 in 1980 to 94,448 in 1985.
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  7. 7
    034498

    FPA youth projects planned for 1985.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]

    [Unpublished] [1984]. [3] p.

    Tables are presented that show the number of youth projects that Family Planning Associations (FPAs) intend to implement during 1985. The information was derived from the 63 Three Year Plans for 1985-87 received at the International Office by September 1984. This number covers most of the FPAs in each region. The exception is the Western Hemisphere where several of their plans arrived in London too late to be included in the analysis. 4 main types of youth work were identified, and this is shown for each country in the tables: to provide family life and population education for young people; to train teachers/youth leaders in the promotion of youth work; to provide family planning/counseling services for young people; and to promote increased awareness of issues affecting young people. The total number of youth projects planned for 1985 is 30 for the 15 countries of Africa. 24 projects are planned for the 13 countries of the Caribbean, Central, and South America. 59 projects are planned for 12 Asian countries.
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  8. 8
    029715

    Official development assistance for population activities: a review.

    Herz BK

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, 1984. 153 p. (World Bank Staff Working Papers No. 688; Population and Development Series No. 13)

    The 5 chapters of this document, which traces the sources of assiastance for family planning and other population programs from developed countries and the flow of assistance through principal channel organizations to developing countries, focus on the following: population assistance flows; rationales for population assistance; the shape of population programs; the major channels; and the future of population assistance. Official development assistance for population comes primarily from the US, the Nordic countries, and more recently from the Federal Republic of Germany and Japan. Population assistance is channeled primarily through the UN Fund for Population Assistance (UNFPA), nongovernmental organizations, bilateral programs, and the World Bank. In discussing why developing countries seek and why developed countries provide population assistance, this paper concentrates on official views of how population growth and high fertility affect economic development, environment, maternal and child health, and women's welfare. It explains why some countries are reluctant to seek or provide more population assistance. The paper also analyzes what population assistance does to extend reliable and affordable family planning services and information and to improve understanding of population growth, its causes, and consequences. It summarizes current population policies and family planning programs in major regions of the 3rd world and considers the role of assistance. This paper identifies the comparative advantages of principal organizations providing population assistance, focusing on UNFPA, the major nongovernment organizarions, and the major bilateral programs. Finally, it discusses the evolution of "policy issues" affecting population assistance, particularly donors' concern for "demand" for family planning, cost effectiveness of family planning services, safety, and voluntarism.
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  9. 9
    009350

    International Planned Parenthood Federation.

    Dennis F

    In: Ross JA, ed. International encyclopedia of population. Vol. 1. New York, Free Press, 1982. 373-4.

    The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), founded at an international conference in Bombay in 1952 by the family planning associations of 8 countries, is an independent world body that united national family planning associates in 100 countries. It has provided the voluntary leadership of the family planning movement for the past 30 years. It offers financial and technical assistance to family planning associates in developing countries, promotes the transfer of knowledge and experience among associations, and articulates the interests of the family planning movement at the global level. IPPF fosters the establishment of new associations and assists many small local groups to develop into national organizations. For the past few years the IPPF has operated with an annual international budget of about $50 million, most of which is distributed in grants to national family planning associations in developing countries. Associations in developed nations participate as members but depend on local support for funding. At this time IPPF is the 2nd largest nongovernmental organization in the world in terms of the global spread of its activities and the volume and scope of its operations. It is the leading nongovernmental organization involved in population and family planning efforts. IPPF is a professional organization and an international authority on the provision of family planning education and service.
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  10. 10
    266340

    Parliamentarians, population and development.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]

    London, England, IPPF, July 1982. 4 p. (IPPF Fact Sheet)

    Discusses the movement to establish groups of Parliamentarians on Population and Development throughout the world. The movement grew out of the need to create understanding among legislators and policymakers of the interrelationship between development, population, and family planning. Parliamentarian groups can help to ensure that population and family planning are included in development plans and that resources are committed to population and family planning programs. The main initiative for the establishment of Parliamentarian groups and for their regional and international cooperation came from the United Nations Fund for Population activities (UNFPA). The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) has been involved from the beginning and works closely with UNFPA. The meeting of Parliamentarians on Population and Development during 1981 resulted in important regional developments, with IMF affiliates playing a major role. The Washington Conference on Population and Development included Parliamentarians from the Caribbean and Latin America. Priorities for formulating population and development policies were identified. The African Conference of Parliamentarians on Population and Development marked the first time that a major conference on so sensitive an issue was held in Africa. The Beijung conference was attended by 19 Asian countries and resulted in a declaration calling on Parliaments, governments, UN agencies, and nongovernmental organizations to increase their commitment to all aspects of population and family planning. National developments in India and the Philippines are also discussed. Many of the countries with Parliamentary groups on Population and Development have governments that are involved in providing international population assistance. Greater commitment to population as a crucial factor in development through the establishment of links with governments and parliamentarians is an action area within the IPPF 1982-84 plan.
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  11. 11
    266341

    Injectable contraception.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]

    London, England, IPPF, April 1983. 9 p. (IPPF Fact Sheet)

    Discusses the International Planned Parenthood Federation's (IPPF) position on the use of injectable contraceptives. The 2 currently available injectable contraceptives are depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA), which is marketed under the name Depo-Provera, and norethisterone acetate (NET-EN), sold as Noristerat or Norigest. Injectable contraceptives are highly effective, convenient, and have a long-acting effect which is an advantage. DMPA has been approved for contraceptive use in more than 80 developing and developed countries, and NEP-EN, a recent introduction, in 40 countries. After the contraceptive has been approved for domestic use, it is supplied by IPPF to those countries which request it. Injectables are also provided for contraceptive use by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA). The current positions of the WHO and the IPPF are covered, as well as the positions of Britain, Sweden, and the United States. Criticisms of the injectable contraceptives and IPPF's position regarding these are also discussed. After taking the criticisms into account, IPPF concludes that there is not sufficient reason to change its current position on injectable contraceptives. It will continue to keep all methods under close and continuous review.
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