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  1. 1
    193443

    Ten years after Alma-Ata.

    Bryant JH

    WORLD HEALTH. 1988 Aug-Sep; 10-5.

    The 1978 International Conference on Primary Health Care (PHC) in Alma-Ata, USSR, sponsored by the World Health Organization (WHO) and by UNICEF, culminated in the Declaration of Alma-Ata. This Declaration, signed by representatives of 134 nations, pledged urgent action for the development of PHC and toward the goal of "Health for All by the Year 2000." Among the most important principles of PHC are these 5: 1) that care should be accessible to all, especially those in greatest need; 2) that health services should promote popular understanding of health issues, and should emphasize preventive as well as curative measures; 3) that health services should be adapted to local economic and cultural circumstances, and be effective; 4) that local communities should be actively involved in the process of defining health problems and developing solutions; and 5) that health development programs should involve cooperation among all the community and national development efforts that have an impact on health. Even before the Declaration 10 years ago, the concepts underlying PHC had been taking root around the world. Progress toward the ideals of PHC has been made. Immunizations rates increased from 5% in 1970 to 40% in 1980. Only 34 countries had under-5 mortality rates of 178/1000 or more in 1985. 1/2 the number of 25 years earlier. However, PHC has in general achieved much better coverage in the developed countries than in the developing ones. The increase in world poverty -- to 1 billion people in absolute poverty today -- is a major setback for PHC. A major cause of health problems in the 3rd World is the too-rapid growth of unwieldy cities. Another common problem is that the training of medical professionals has not prepared them for leadership roles in community-oriented, preventive health programs. The ideals of PHC have been widely accepted throughout the world, and progress has been made, but much remains to be done.
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  2. 2
    048018

    Evaluating progress.

    Roy L

    WORLD HEALTH. 1988 Jan-Feb; 10-11.

    In 1979 WHO invited its member states to participate in a global strategy for health and to monitor and evaluate its effectiveness using a minimum of 12 indicators. Members' 1982 implementation reports and 1985 evaluation reports form the basis for evaluating each measure. Indicators 1-6 have strong political and economic components in both developed and developing countries and are not complete. Indicator 7, for which rates of reply are satisfactory, asks whether at least 5 elements of primary health care are available to the whole population. The 8th gauge seeks information on the nutritional status of children, considering birth weight (a possible indicator of risk) and weight for age (a monitor of growth). Infant mortality rate and life expectancy at birth, indicators 9 and 10, are difficult to estimate in developing countries, and health services are not always kept informed of current estimates. Indicator 11 asks whether the literacy rate exceeds 70%; it can provide information on level of development and should emphasize literacy for women, for whom health information is critical. The last global measure yields information about the gross national product, which is not always the most recent, despite the trend of countries to publish their gross domestic product. Failure to make use of the best national sources, such as this, is one of several problems encountered by WHO's member states in collecting accurate data. Other problems include lack of universally acceptable definitions, different national accounting systems, disinterest of health authorities in economic matters, lack of staff, lack of financial resources in developing countries, and inadequately structured health system management. Each country must choose the most appropriate methods for collection of data. If an indicator cannot be calculated, the country is encouraged to seek and devise a substitute. WHO must produce more precise and reliable indicators. It must respond to requests for ways of improving or strengthening national systems.
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  3. 3
    270319

    Health as a bridge for peace.

    Schneider ML

    WORLD HEALTH. 1987 Oct; 4-6.

    3 years ago, the Central American countries of Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Panama began a subregional initiative with PAHO/AMRO named "Health as a Bridge to Peace." Formally called "Priority Health Needs in Central America and Panama," this initiative has included: 1) A temporary cease-fire in El Salvador each year between government and guerrillas, permitting a 3-day nationwide immunization campaign throughout the country; 2) Belize's inclusion for the 1st time in an annual meeting of the Ministers of Health in Central America and Panama. The directors of the Social Security Institutions also participated. Although recent conflicts had strained international dialog, the initiative spurred cooperation between all countries of the region, including formal agreement between the Ministers of Health of Honduras and Nicaragua to conduct joint border monitoring to prevent the spread of malaria and other tropical diseases, mutual spraying in malaria endemic areas by Nicaragua and Costa Rica, and training and technical cooperation exchanges between the countries and their neighbors. Last year, in the 1st joint purchase from a revolving fund for essential drugs, the countries obtained some 17 drugs more than 300% cheaper than each had purchased them seperately the previous year. Priorities of the initiative are health services, human resources, essential drugs, food and nutrition, tropical diseases, and child survival. It concentrates on mothers and on children under 5, on refugees and displaced persons, and on the urban and rural poor.
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  4. 4
    039700

    [The Population Council in Latin America and the Caribbean 1985] The Population Council en Latinoamerica y en el Caribe 1985

    Population Council. Regional Office for Latin America and the Caribbean

    Mexico D.F., Mexico, The Population Council, [1986]. 26 p.

    This pamphlet describes the work of the Population Council in the Latin America/Caribbean region in the year 1985. Activities are grouped under 5 headings. 1) Health and family planning (FP) activities: The Population Council has been involved with operational research for FP and maternal-child health (MCH) programs in several countries, and on projects as diverse as distribution of oral rehydration equipment (Ecuador) to testing of mass-media promotion of vasectomies (Brazil). A cost-benefit analysis was carried out for FP activities of the Mexican Social Security institution. Social marketing has been explored as an alternative and less costly distribution system for contraceptives in Colombia. Natural FP training as an alternative method was integrated into the array of FP services of the MCH program in Bogota, Colombia. A training viideotape has been used by community health programs in Boyaca, Colombia. 2) Health, Infant Mortality, and Adolescent Fertility: A workshop dealing with the problem of child survival, which is still quite serious in Latin America, was held in Mexico, with the participation of an international panel of experts. A pilot project on adolescent pregancy has been organized paralled with a project of female education and fertility in developing countries. 3) As part of an overall initiative for the introduction of new contraceptives, the NORPLANT implant, which releases levonorgestrel from silastic rubber implants under the skin, was introduced on an experimental basis in several countries. 4) Population and development projects have consisted of working papers, and program evaluations for programs in Mexico, Jamaica, and Peru. 5) Finally grants to students in population-related social and biomedical sciences have been administered by the council: a total of 236 in 18 countries between 1953 and 1985.
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  5. 5
    033836

    Report on the evaluation of various family life education projects with particular emphasis on youth in the English-speaking Caribbean: general conclusions and recommendations.

    Corona E; Epps RP; Kodagoda N; Simonen M

    New York, New York, United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA], 1984 Nov. xii, 39, [7] p.

    Most family life education (FLE) projects included in this evaluation have the longterm objectives of reducing the incidence of teenage prognancy, and promotion of self-reliance and positive, responsible behavior among youth. The immediate objectives and project strategies are also very similar across projects, e.g., in-school and out-of-school FLE, comprehensive youth services, including family planning (FP) and training. The evaluation shows that project design has improved over the years (clearer and measurable formulation of objectives, more comprehensive workplans and better explanation of budgetary items) and projects have moved from addressing a wide variety of broad issues to a more focused consideration of adolescent fertility. However, the Evaluation Mission in concerned that due to the similarities in project design, country-and-time-specific factors have not always been adequately taken into consideration. Other concerns include the lack of systematic needs assessment and use of baseline data to guide implementation. All the projects evaluated have contributed to the training in FLE/FP of a large number of family life educators, teachers and nurses and have thus significantly strengthened professional national capability. Nevertheless, training needs still exist in motivational/attitudinal variables, sex roles, teaching/learning technics. The projects have made a significant contribution to the introduction of FLE into schools and teacher training institutions. The focus at present should be the institutionalization of FLE within the in-school sector, including the development of a policy approving FLE in schools. The development of community-based health centers was often the central activity of the out-of-school FLE component of the projects. These centers have contributed to shaping the countries' attitudes by creating an awareness of teenage pregnancy, by developing an acceptable strategy, by providing a focal point for discussing sensitive issues, and by becoming a mechanism for community mobilization. The projects have also contributed to making FP services available and specialized services for adolescents are being established. The emphasis has been more on education and awareness creation than on contraceptive distribution to adolescents. At present the need is to strengthen the service delivery components. The limited availability of data suggests that adolescent pregnancy remains an urgent problem in the region. Sustained and more focused FLE/FP program efforts directed to adolescents continue to be needed in the region. The most important general lesson learnt from the programs is that programs in adolescent fertility can be started and implemented in countries even prior to declaration of policy by governments. However, at a certain stage of implementation the programs cannot be carried further without explicit government policies and control.
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  6. 6
    268459

    Annual report of the director, 1984.

    Pan American Health Organization [PAHO]

    Washington, D.C., PAHO, Pan American Sanitary Bureau/Regional Office of the World Health Organization, 1985. xix, 265 p. (Official Document No. 201)

    Efforts to meet the goal of health for all by the year 2000 have been hampered by the internal and external problems faced by many countries of the Americas. The pressures of external debt have been accompanied by a reduction in the resources allocated to social sector programs, including health programs. In addition, the conflict in Central America has constrained solutions to subregional problems. The health sector suffers from uncoordinated services, lack of trained personnel, and waste. Thus 30-40% of the population do not have access to basic health services. In 1984, the governments in the region, together with the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), undertook projects in 5 action areas: new approaches and technology, development, intra- and intersectoral linkages, joint activities by groups of countries, mobilization of national resources and external financing, and preparation of PAHO to meet the needs of these processes. New approaches include the expansion of epidemiological capabilities and practices, the use of low-cost infant survival strategies, the improvement of rural water supplies, and the development of domestic technology. Interorganizational linkages are aimed at eliminating duplication and filling in gaps. Ministers of health and directors of social security programs are working together to rationalize the health sector and extend coverage of services. Similarly, countries have grouped to deal with common problems and offer coordinated solutions. The mobilization of national resources involves shifting resources into the health field and increasing their efficiency and effectiveness by setting priorities. External resources are recommended if they supplement national efforts and are short-term in nature. In order to enhance these strategies, PAHO has increased the managerial and operating capacity of its central and field offices. This has required consolidating programs, retraining staff, and instituting information systems to monitor activities and budgets. The report summarizes health indicators and activities by country, for all nations under PAHO.
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  7. 7
    268448

    Report on the evaluation of various family life education projects with particular emphasis on youth in the English-speaking Caribbean: country reports.

    Corona E; Epps RP; Kodagoda N; Simonen M

    New York, New York, United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA], 1984 Nov. xiv, 89 p.

    UNFPA has provided funding for various family life education (FLE) projects with particular emphasis on youth in the English-speaking Caribbean since the mid-1970s; this report is an independent evaluation of the projects in Antigua, Barbados, Dominica, Jamaica, St. Lucia, and St. Christopher and Nevis. Although birth rates are relatively low in the English-speaking Caribbean, the incidence of adolescent pregnancy and the number of births to women under the age of 20 is an important problem in the region. The Mission concluded overall that the projects have contributed to pioneering and groundbreaking efforts demonstrating that it is possible to initiate and make considerable progress in the implementation of FLE/FP programs for adolescents even when adolescent pregnancy and births are still highly sensitive and controversial issues and when there are no official policies in favor of such programs. The Mission concluded also that project design had improved over the years and projects have moved from addressing a wide variety of broad issues to a more focused consideration of adolescent fertility. All the projects included in the evaluation have contributed to the training in FLE/FP of a large number of family life educators, teachers, and nurses and, as a result, have significantly strengthened professional national capability. The projects have shown that despite the lack of official policy approving FLE in schools and generally overcrowded curricula, FLE can be introduced into schools. In the area of FP service delivery, the projects included in the evaluation have contributed to making FP services generally available through integration with the government maternal and child health services. The main management issues across the projects were similar and included staffing, coordination, supervision, monitoring and evaluation. There is a need to adjust project design so that gender separation is minimized and that the FLE content deals better with issues such as self-awareness, sex roles, and self-esteem. The wider impact of the projects included in this evaluation, to be reflected, for example, in reduced incidence of teenage pregnancy, reduced maternal and infant/child morbidity and mortality, and more generally in the life patterns of women, cannot yet be measured.
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  8. 8
    029901

    The potential of national household survey programmes for monitoring and evaluating primary health care in developing countries. L'apport potentiel des enquetes nationales sur les menages a la surveillance et a l'evaluation des soins de sante primaires dans les pays en developpement.

    Carlson BA

    World Health Statistics Quarterly. Rapport Trimestriel de Statistiques Sanitaires Mondiales. 1985; 38(1):38-64.

    National programs of household sample surveys, such as those being encouraged through the National Household Survey Capability Program (NHSCP), are a principal source of information on primary health care in developing countries. Being representative of the total population, the major population subgroups and geographic subdivisions, they permit calculation of health status and utilization of health services. Household surveys have an important role to play in monitoring and evaluating primary health care since they sample directly the intended beneficiaries, and so can be used to judge the extent to which programs are meeting expected goals. Caution is necessary, however, since methodological problems have been experienced for many evaluation surveys. National surveys are especially appropriate for measuring many indicators of progress towards national goals within a broad socioeconomic perspective. Future directions in making the optimum use of household surveys for health program purposes are indicated. The NHSCP is a major undertaking of the UN system including WHO to collaborate with developing countries to establish a continuing flow of integrated statistics on a recurrent basis to support the national development process and information priorities. It brings together the principal users and producers of data to plan and conduct surveys which respond to national needs and priorities. The NHSCP encourages countries to employ a permanent national field organization for data collection. Areas of discussion are: the potential for monitoring and evaluation, the household survey as a source of health indicators, the demand for household surveys of health, followed by a summary of the health and health-related topics covered by 6 national health and nutrition surveys conducted in several developing countries. The special themes of infant and child mortality, morbidity and nutritional surveillance are also considered. The experience of many developed countries has been very positive with the use of nonmedically organized health surveys. Although the sample survey can be used in many settings to obtain population-based data, it must be carefully designed and implemented according to scientific procedures in order for the results to be validly extrapolated to the population or subgroups of primary concern.
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  9. 9
    267092

    Assessments: the operational scene, statement made at the Second Committee of the 30th Session of the United Nations General Assembly, New York, 24 October 1975.

    Salas RM

    New York, N.Y., UNFPA, [1975]. 4 p.

    This statement on the UNFPA details the operational activities for development. As of October, 1975, a total of US$239 million were pledged to UNFPA by 78 countries, 18.5% above that of 1974. Resources were allocated by UNFPA to 1350 projects in 106 countries. In addition to the 128 governments participating in these projects, all organizations concerned in the UN system are involved. A few of the major advances of the past year are outlined in this report, as well as several problems encountered by the UNFPA. 4 significant advances include: 1) the 1st conference on Population Activities in the Arab States--it unanimously adopted a series of resolutions marking the advent of a systematic approach to population matters throughout the Arab world; 2) a pronounced improvement in the rate of implementation of UNFPA projects throughout the world; 3) a 70% increase in UNFPA-supported projects which governments are executing; 4) compilation and publication by UNFPA of an inventory listing all population projects receiving international support in 1973 and 1974. The major problem facing the UNFPA is that of finance. Despite the increase in contributions, the requests of governments outstrip the Fund's resources. The resources gap produces a 2nd basic problem: when funds can no longer meet all requests, it becomes necessary to choose between requests. This forced establishment of priorities is very difficult.
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  10. 10
    267059

    [Population and the new international economic order] La poblacion y el neuvo orden economico internacional.

    Salas RM

    Medicina y Desarrollo. 1977 May; 13-16.

    The problem of population received little attention in the meetings on the New International Economic Order. Historically, governments have equated population increases with prosperity. Recently, governments have accepted the necessity to reduce population for the succcess of social and economic programs. This article points out the advances made by several countries in the areas of health, nutrition, education, contraception, legal aspects, planning, and research methods since 1972. The collaboration of different governments with UNFPA and their solicitation of help from this organization are regarded as further evidence of the advances made. Difficulties for the acceptance of family planning in developing countries such as social sanctions, lack of demographic data, and the role of UNFPA in the amelioration of these problems are discussed. Since population politics are seen as long-term strategical weapons, an intensification of persuasive methods in all countries and an increase in aid to underdeveloped countries are recommended.
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  11. 11
    268487

    Evaluation of UNFPA assistance to the family planning programme of the Dominican Republic, 1978-1982/3.

    Requena M; Echeverry G; Frieiro LB

    New York, New York, United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA], 1983 Aug. xii, 48, [11] p. (DOM/73/P01)

    This evaluation was carried out by an independent mission coordinated by the United Nations Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA) Evaluation Branch. The program's long-term objectives are to reduce the birth rate to 29/1000, reduce mortality rates, achieve a sustained reduction in fertility rates and to devise and implement a specific population policy. Immediate objectives are to acheive the functional integration and financial self-sufficiency to carry out family planning programs, offer family planning services to the entire population and increase the demand for them, to offer new methods, especially female sterilization, and alter the distribution of users by method; increase active users to 22% of the country's women and to increase the availability of health personnel. In general, the Evaluation Mission found that the project documents describing the objectives to be achieved, strategy, activities and inputs do not elaborate sufficiently on the relationship between objectives and activities and the inputs required and do not give details about the strategy for achieving objectives. The birth rate was estimated at 34.5/1000 in 1982. Infant mortality seems to be declining particularly fast in areas with active rural health promotors. No specific population policy has been enuciated. The program has, to a large extent, achieved the immediate objectives set for it, except that of financial self-sufficiency. The program's strongest elements are the considerable expansion of the physical and health personnel infrastructre; political and institutional willingness to carry out integrated maternal and child health and family planning programs; and the great demand for family planning services by the population. Week elements which have hindered the program's progress are the abence of a tradition of public health and preventive medicine in the country, which has resulted in inadequate training of medical personnel and a lack of motivation, and the extreme centralization of the health system and the consequent lack of delegation of authority and resources which limits the initiative and action of personnel at supposedly operational levels. Other weaknesses are the cultural models which favor authoritarianism and paternalism; the stressing of a clinic-based service delivery system as opposed to the Primary Health Care approach; the lack of direct information education and communication (IEC) action in the communities; the lack of a strategy to gather the knowledge existing in such communities to incorporate it in the joint planning of services, and deficiencies in supervision and evaluation which are aimed at measuring goals and results but not at identifying and analyzing problems.
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