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  1. 1
    273331

    Donor support for contraceptives and condoms for STI / HIV prevention, 2002.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 2004. iv, 17 p. (E/500/2004)

    This report is intended for use in planning contraceptive supply, and for advocacy and resource mobilization. It contains country-specific information provided by donors on the type, quantity and total cost of contraceptives they supplied to reproductive health programmes in developing countries during 2002. The United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) collected information for this report in 2003; as in earlier years, the UNFPA database is especially useful to illustrate commodity shortfalls and changes in funding by donor and country. The report highlights trends since 1990 and the gap between estimated needs and actual donor support, comparing UNFPA estimates of condom requirements for STI/HIV prevention, and contraceptive requirements for family planning programmes, with actual donor support. It also indicates donor support by region and product, the top ten countries supported by donors and the quantity of male and female condoms supplied. UNFPA tried to collect information on donor support for antibiotics for prevention of STIs/RTIs. In many cases, however, either donors did not record this information or the countries receiving support did not disaggregate information by commodity. UNFPA’s Commodity Management Unit will continue to discuss how to collect this information. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    168060

    Securing future supplies for family planning and HIV / AIDS prevention.

    Ashford L

    Washington, D.C., Population Reference Bureau, MEASURE Communication, 2002 Feb. [8] p. (MEASURE Communication Policy Brief; USAID Contract No. HRN-A-00-98-000001-00)

    This document presents factors that contribute to the growing shortfall of contraceptive supplies in developing countries. These include: 1) more people of reproductive age; 2) growing interest in contraceptive use; 3) the spread of HIV/AIDS; 4) insufficient and poorly coordinated donor funding; and 5) inadequate logistics capacity in developing countries. An international network called the Interim Working Group on Reproductive Health Commodity Security is helping to raise awareness of the problem and find solutions. The group convened a meeting in Istanbul in May 2001, in which representatives of governments and nongovernmental organizations endorsed actions in four areas-- advocacy, national capacity building, financing, and donor coordination. Continued work on this issue focuses on developing country-specific strategies that bring together the national and international partners who play a role in bringing supplies to those who need them.
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  3. 3
    033836

    Report on the evaluation of various family life education projects with particular emphasis on youth in the English-speaking Caribbean: general conclusions and recommendations.

    Corona E; Epps RP; Kodagoda N; Simonen M

    New York, New York, United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA], 1984 Nov. xii, 39, [7] p.

    Most family life education (FLE) projects included in this evaluation have the longterm objectives of reducing the incidence of teenage prognancy, and promotion of self-reliance and positive, responsible behavior among youth. The immediate objectives and project strategies are also very similar across projects, e.g., in-school and out-of-school FLE, comprehensive youth services, including family planning (FP) and training. The evaluation shows that project design has improved over the years (clearer and measurable formulation of objectives, more comprehensive workplans and better explanation of budgetary items) and projects have moved from addressing a wide variety of broad issues to a more focused consideration of adolescent fertility. However, the Evaluation Mission in concerned that due to the similarities in project design, country-and-time-specific factors have not always been adequately taken into consideration. Other concerns include the lack of systematic needs assessment and use of baseline data to guide implementation. All the projects evaluated have contributed to the training in FLE/FP of a large number of family life educators, teachers and nurses and have thus significantly strengthened professional national capability. Nevertheless, training needs still exist in motivational/attitudinal variables, sex roles, teaching/learning technics. The projects have made a significant contribution to the introduction of FLE into schools and teacher training institutions. The focus at present should be the institutionalization of FLE within the in-school sector, including the development of a policy approving FLE in schools. The development of community-based health centers was often the central activity of the out-of-school FLE component of the projects. These centers have contributed to shaping the countries' attitudes by creating an awareness of teenage pregnancy, by developing an acceptable strategy, by providing a focal point for discussing sensitive issues, and by becoming a mechanism for community mobilization. The projects have also contributed to making FP services available and specialized services for adolescents are being established. The emphasis has been more on education and awareness creation than on contraceptive distribution to adolescents. At present the need is to strengthen the service delivery components. The limited availability of data suggests that adolescent pregnancy remains an urgent problem in the region. Sustained and more focused FLE/FP program efforts directed to adolescents continue to be needed in the region. The most important general lesson learnt from the programs is that programs in adolescent fertility can be started and implemented in countries even prior to declaration of policy by governments. However, at a certain stage of implementation the programs cannot be carried further without explicit government policies and control.
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  4. 4
    003525

    'Banned' birth jab used in Third World.

    Sweeney C

    GUARDIAN (MANCHESTER, ENGLAND). 1977 Jul 6; 1,6.

    The injectable contraceptive Depo Provera, banned in the U.S. and other Western countries because of associated cancer risks, is currently being distributed by Western governments in the Third World countries. There are now more than 500,000 women in Asia and Africa who are currently using the contraceptive containing MPA (medroxyprogesterone acetate), which in U.S. Food and Drug Administration trials produced cancers in beagle bitches. The U.S. and Swedish governments, through WHO, IPPF (International Planned Parenthood Federation) and other bodies, are financing the distribution of the contraceptive in Asia. 2 issues are raised by this distribution activity: 1) the ethical issue of using drugs banned in the West on illiterate women in the Third World; and 2) the use of contraceptives on a huge scale, despite FDA warnings and bans in Western countries. Asian doctors have long pointed out that Western companies whose products have been banned in their own countries have been dumping substandard equipment and medicines into the Asian market. Depo Provera, injected every 3 months, is widely used in Southeast Asia, particularly in Thailand. The London-based IPPF is the world's largest distributor of the contraceptive. The Family Planning Association in Britain has applied for the lifting of restrictions in Britain, but the Committee on Safety of Medicines has approved its short-term use only for women whose husbands have had a vasectomy and for women being immunized against German measles. Dr. Malcolm Potts, medical advisor to IPPF, and other research clinics in Britain and in the U.S. questioned the association between beagle trials and women taking far lower doses. Thai women who had been treated with Depo over many years have not shown any increase in cancerous symptoms. However, the real issue behind the controversy is the distribution of Western medicines and drugs in Third World countries. As Dr. Zafrullah Choudhury, founder of the "barefoot doctor" scheme in Bangladesh said, "Western doctors feel they can do experiments on Asian women because they are poor and illiterate. They do not regard them as people. They...see family planning in terms of numbers....in terms of population control rather than people."
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  5. 5
    266341

    Injectable contraception.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]

    London, England, IPPF, April 1983. 9 p. (IPPF Fact Sheet)

    Discusses the International Planned Parenthood Federation's (IPPF) position on the use of injectable contraceptives. The 2 currently available injectable contraceptives are depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA), which is marketed under the name Depo-Provera, and norethisterone acetate (NET-EN), sold as Noristerat or Norigest. Injectable contraceptives are highly effective, convenient, and have a long-acting effect which is an advantage. DMPA has been approved for contraceptive use in more than 80 developing and developed countries, and NEP-EN, a recent introduction, in 40 countries. After the contraceptive has been approved for domestic use, it is supplied by IPPF to those countries which request it. Injectables are also provided for contraceptive use by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA). The current positions of the WHO and the IPPF are covered, as well as the positions of Britain, Sweden, and the United States. Criticisms of the injectable contraceptives and IPPF's position regarding these are also discussed. After taking the criticisms into account, IPPF concludes that there is not sufficient reason to change its current position on injectable contraceptives. It will continue to keep all methods under close and continuous review.
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