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Your search found 9 Results

  1. 1
    303243

    Further studies of geographic variation in naturally acquired tuberculin sensitivity.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Tuberculosis Research Office

    Bulletin of the World Health Organization. 1955; 22:63-83.

    This paper presents the results of the tuberculin-testing of over 3,600 patients in tuberculosis hospitals and of nearly 34,000 schoolchildren in widely separated areas where arrangements could be made for specially trained personnel to work uniform materials and techniques. Both patients and children were tested with an intradermal dose of 5 TU, and the children were retested with 100 TU if the reactions were less than 5 mm. The results confirm those of earlier papers, that at least two different kinds of naturally acquired tuberculin sensitivity are found in many human populations: a high-grade sensitivity, designated as specific for virulent tuberculous infection, and a low-grade kind designated as non-specific, or not specific for tuberculous infection. Specific sensitivity is the kind found in tuberculous patients and in some schoolchildren everywhere. It follows a remarkably uniform pattern wherever it is found, apparently varying only in prevalence, not in degree, from place to place. In contrast, non- specific sensitivity varies both in prevalence and in degree. It ranges from nearly universal prevalence in some localities to almost complete absence in others, from a low degree to a relatively high degree approaching that of specific sensitivity. Non-specific sensitivity is not correlated with specific sensitivity and may have different causes in different places. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    191585
    Peer Reviewed

    Marvellous microbicides. Intravaginal gels could save millions of lives, but first someone has to prove that they work.

    Brown H

    Lancet. 2004 Mar 27; 363(9414):1042-1043.

    Preventing AIDS is theoretically simple: encourage mutual monogamy or consistent condom use. But experts warn that if responsibility for protection stays with men, these interventions will produce only small gains in the fight against AIDS. The majority of women in some parts of sub-Sarahan Africa are in immediate danger of contracting HIV. But these women are powerless to protect themselves because most are dependent on men for economic security, and are often unable to negotiate safe sex. If a method of HIV prevention were available that women could administer themselves, the situation could rapidly become very different. Alan Stone, chairman of the International Working Group on Microbicides believes that microbicides —topical agents that stop the HIV virus being transmitted during intercourse— are the only realistic option. “There is absolutely nothing else on the horizon that could make a large-scale impact”, he says. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    139806

    Sexually transmitted diseases research needs: report of a WHO consultative group, Copenhagen, 13-14 September 1989.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Programme for Sexually Transmitted Diseases

    [Unpublished] 1991. Presented at the 1st International Course on Planning and Managing STD Control Activities in Developing Countries, Antwerp, Belgium, September 9-21, 1991. 31 p.

    In response to the growing needs for research into sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), the STD Program of the World Health Organization (WHO) in September 1989 convened a small interdisciplinary consultative group of scientists from both developing and more developed countries to review STD research priorities. The consultation was organized based upon the belief that a joint consideration of global STD research priorities and local research capabilities would increase overall research capacity by coordinating the efforts of scientists from around the world to get the job done. Participants considered the areas of biomedical research, clinical and epidemiological research, behavioral research, and operations research. However, research needs directly related to HIV were not considered except where they interfaced with research on other STDs. The above areas of research, as well as the expansion of interregional and interdisciplinary collaborations, the strengthening of research institutions, developing and strengthening research training, and facilitating technology transfer and the use of marketing systems are discussed.
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  4. 4
    272260

    New WHO data on a progestin-releasing vaginal ring.

    OUTLOOK. 1990 Jun; 8(2):7-9.

    This article summarizes the most recent data on WHO's multicenter clinical trial test of the low dose progestin-releasing vaginal ring as an effective contraceptive for women. The study involved 1005 women aged 19-34 and was carried out from 1980-86 at 19 centers in 13 countries, including 9 developing countries. The overall findings on vaginal ring use included: the ring's effectiveness was comparable to oral contraceptive (OC) effectiveness, pregnancy rates increased with increasing body weight, about 1/2 of the users had discontinued the ring by 1 year, the ring disrupted menstrual bleeding patterns in about 1/2 of all users, and about 1/4 of all users expelled the ring at least once but most continued to use it. The irregular bleeding pattern was the main reason for discontinuation. Part of the reason for having different ring contraceptive effectiveness in different countries could be due to differing average weights of the women. Increasing risk of expulsion was directly related to increasing age by approximately 3% with each year of age. For effective use of 90-day low-dose levonorgestrel-releasing vaginal ring, appropriate clients should have the following: a dislike for inserting and removing vaginal devices, low weight, counselling on potentially irregular bleeding, and counseling on how to deal with an expulsion. (author's modified)
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  5. 5
    044175
    Peer Reviewed

    Infant feeding in the Third World.

    Ebrahim GJ

    POSTGRADUATE MEDICAL JOURNAL. 1986; 62(724):93-6.

    Breastfeeding has been on the decline in the 3rd world for the past 20 years or so. Modernization has been blamed, yet in the industrialized nations of Sweden, Britain, and the US, women play significant roles in the labor force, are active in professional and public life, and in most Western nations the educated women and those from the professional and upper classes are most likely to breastfeed their babies. Regarding milk substitutes, many products unacceptable in the Western market are on sale in developing nations. In the absence of strong governmental controls, consumer pressure, and professional vigilance, bottle feeding is taken lightly with disasterous consequences. 3 main dangers have been identified: those arising from the nonavailability of protective substances of breast milk to the infant; those arising from the contamination of the feed in a highly polluted environment of poverty and ignorance of simple principles of hygiene; and those arising from overdilution of feeds on the account of the costs of the baby foods. Market forces and competition led the manufacturers of baby foods to stake their claims to the markets of the 3rd world, and almost all of them adopted undesirable promotional methods. The ensuing uproar led to an International Code of Ethics being adopted at the 33rd world Health Assembly under the auspices of the World Health Organization. Although the matter should have rested there, some manufacturers developed their own codes and have persuaded governments to adopt alternative codes. The present situation with regard to infant feeding in the 33rd world should be considered in the context of the international developments identified and also in light of several social and demographic processes. At the current rates of growth in population up to 80% of humanity will be living in the 3rd world by the end of the 20th century. The 2nd demographic phenomenon of social and political significance is the unprecedented increase in the growth of the urban population with national health and social services failing to respond adequately to the challenge of this growth. In many developing countries national planners and economists are beginning to look upon human milk as an important national resource, and the need for a network of services to ensure the nutrition and health of pregnant and lactating women is obvious and is recognized internationally. With regard to the question of adequacy of breast milk, there are many gaps in knowledge. Each community needs to be studied separately, and those involved in scientific research in 1 environment should resist the temptation of extrapolating the results to communities and societies with a different set of circumstances.
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  6. 6
    034703

    Patterns of infertility in the developing world: preliminary observations from the WHO clinical study, Task Force on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Infertility, WHO Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction.

    Cates W; Farley TM; Rowe PJ

    [Unpublished] 1984 Feb. 11 p.

    This paper presents preliminary observations on infertility derived from a World Health Organization (WHO) clinical study conducted in 33 medical centers in 25 developed and developing countries. A major purpose of the investigation was to provide a standardized approach, including standardized diagnostic procedures and identical definitions, for the study of infertile couples. As of January 1984, 7600 couples had been enrolled in the study and over 5400 had completed the protocol. Infertility of at least 1 year's duration was required for admission to the study. The study results so far suggest certain patterns. Couples in developed countries were more likely to have primary than secondary infertility and to have been infertile for a shorter period of time than those in developing countries. However, Africa was the only area in which the majority of couples requesting medical consultation had secondary infertility. Over 70% of couples in developing countries had infertility for over 2.5 years before seeking consultation, whereas half of those in developed countries waited less than 2 years. On the other hand, similar proportions of couples (13-16%) in all regions became pregnant. Reasons for infertility were identified in both partners in 1/3 of African couples and 40% of those in the East Mediterranean region. The rate of infertility of unexplained etiology was 9-20% in developed countries, Latin America, and Asia, but 0% in Africa and 5% in the East Mediterranean. Over half of African women had infection-attributable diagnoses (including 43% bilateral tubal occlusion, 15% pelvic adhesions, and 4% acquired tubal abnormalities), a rate that was 60% higher than in other areas. Similarly, varicocele was diagnosed in 25% of African males investigated compared with 6-19% in other areas. Abnormal sperm morphology and low sperm motility were also more common among African males. Higher risks of tubal occlusion were consistently associated with number of previous pregnancies, a history of sexually transmitted infections, and a previous episode of postpartum or postabortal complications.
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  7. 7
    036241

    A case-control study of ectopic pregnancy in developed and developing countries.

    Gray H

    In: Intrauterine contraception: advances and future prospects, edited by Gerald I. Zatuchni, Alfredo Goldsmith, and John J. Sciarra. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Harper and Row, 1985. 354-64. (PARFR Series on Fertility Regulation)

    Little data is available from developing countries on the incidence of ectopic pregnancy and the associated risk factors: pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), intrauterine devices (IUDs), and abortion. To address this problem, the World Health Organization conducted a multinational case-control study between 1978 and 1980 of factors associated with ectopic pregnancy in 12 centers, 8 in developing countries and 4 in developed countries. Results suggest that risk factors are similar in women from developing and developed countries. The only exceptions were increased risks of ectopic pregnancy associated with spontaneous abortion or smoking in developing but not developed country centers. This may reflect misreporting of illegal induced abortion or postabortion complications, and behavioral differences between smoking and nonsmoking women in developing countries. All methods of contraception prevent pregnancy and so provide protection against ectopic pregnancy. This protective effect is least with the IUD, however, and accidental conceptions during IUD use or after sterilization carry an increased risk of ectopic pregnancy. With the IUD, this probably reflects both differential protection against intrauterine and extrauterine pregnancy and an increased risk of IUD-related PID resulting in tubal damage. The risk of ectopic pregnancy is also increased in women with a previous history of PID or a prior pregnancy. However, cesarean section was found to reduce the risk of ectopic gestations in all comparison groups.
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  8. 8
    267984

    Proceedings of the International Conference on Oral Rehydration Therapy, June 7-10, 1983, Washington, D.C.

    Cash RA

    Washington, D.C., Agency for International Development [AID], Bureau for Science and Technology, 1983. 210 p. (International Conference on Oral Rehydration Therapy, 1983, proceedings)

    With over 600 participants from more than 80 countries, the International Conference on Oral Rehydration Therapy (ICORT) was a testimony to the international health community's recognition of the seriousness of diarrheal disease, the value of oral rehydration therapy, and the commitment to primary health care. The conference, initiated by the Agency for International Development, was cosponsored by the International Center for Diarrheal Disease Research, Bangladesh, the United Nations Children's Fund, and the WHO. The conference focused on oral rehydration therapy, an important treatment of diarrhea. 1 out of 10 children born in developing countries dies from the effects of diarrhea before the age of 5. A 70% reduction in the mortality rate can result from ORT--a major breakthrough for primary health care. Excellent laboratory investigation, well-conducted clinical studies, and careful field observation have led to this effective therapy. Many papers presented at the conference demonstrated the effectiveness of ORT. Participants agreed on the best formula for ORT in terms of electrolyte content and on the need for an international commitment to expand implementation of ORT. Problems in implementing oral therapy programs are discussed. Possible areas of investigation include: 1) improving the solution through the addition of glycine, other amino acids, or cereal-based substrates; 2) developing methods for teaching ORT; and 3) investigating better methods of program evaluation. Innovative approaches to informing the public about the use and benefits of oral therapy were also discussed. Participants, recognizing that problems are shared among many different programs and nations, exchanged ideas and addresses, pledging to keep each other abreast of their ORT research and implementation efforts. The conference closed with a strong call for action to attain near universal availability of ORT in the next 10 years.
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  9. 9
    028322

    The Billings method of family planning: an assessment.

    Betts K

    Studies in Family Planning. 1984 Nov-Dec; 15(6/1):253-66.

    This paper critically analyzes claims for the effectiveness of the Billings method of natural family planning and raises questions about the wisdom of actively promoting this method. The Billings method, developed in Australia, is based on client interpretation of changing patterns of cervical mucus secretion. Evaluation of the method's use-effectiveness has been hindered by its supporters' insistence on distinguishing between method and user failures and by the unreliability of data on sexual activities. However, the findings in 5 large studies aimed at investigating the biological basis of the Billings method provide little support for the claims that most fertile women always experience mucus symptoms, that these symptoms precede ovulation by at least 5 days, and that a peak symptom coincides with the day of ovulation. Although many women do experience a changing pattern of mucus symptoms, these changes do not mark the fertile period with sufficient reliability to form the basis for a fully effective method of fertility control. In addition, the results of 5 major field trials indicate that the Billings method has a biological failure rate even higher than the symptothermal method. Pearl pregnancy rates ranged from 22.2-37.2/100 woman-years, and high discontinuation rates in both developed and developing countries were found. Demand for the method was low even in developing countries where calendar rhythm and withdrawal are relatively popular methods of fertility control, suggesting that women of low socioeconomic status may prefer a method that does not require demanding interaction with service providers and acknowledgment of sexual activity. The Billings method is labor-intensive, requiring repeated client contact over an extended time period and high administrative costs, even when teachers are volunteers. It is concluded that although natural family planning methods may make a useful contribution where more effective methods are unavailable or unacceptable, many of the claims made for the Billings method are unsubstantiated by scientific evidence.
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