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  1. 1
    077372
    Peer Reviewed

    Heartbeat -- the rhythm of health. World Health Day, 7 April 1992.

    Nakajima H

    NURSING JOURNAL OF INDIA. 1992 Apr; 83(4):82-90.

    Heart attacks and stroke kill about 12 million people each year or 25% of all deaths. No other single disease takes so many lives or disables so many people each year. Besides many of these dead are <65 years old resulting in considerable premature deaths. Heart attacks and stroke caused by life style choices even affect people living in developing countries as these countries reduce the prevalence of infectious diseases and develop socioeconomically with their concomitant increase in life expectancies. People in these countries still develop heart diseases that almost do not even exist in developed countries including rheumatic heart disease and heart disease caused by Chagas' disease. Crowded living conditions caused by poverty and limited medical services cause strep throat which left untreated can turn into rheumatic fever and then to heart disease. Yet treatment with penicillin protects against all 3 conditions. About 300,000 new rheumatic heart disease cases arise each year. Yearly deaths from rheumatic heart disease equals about 60,000. Poverty is also responsible for Chagas' disease of which about 17 million suffer in Latin America. In developing countries, the middle class is at highest risk of hypertension. Health promotion activities have resulted in a decline in cardiovascular diseases in developed countries in Western Europe, North America, Australia, and New Zealand. These activities include health education, diet changes, exercise, and no tobacco use. These activities also reduce the prevalence of other diseases thus keeping populations healthier longer. It is important that the healthy life styles begin when children are young. WHO dedicated World Health Day 1992 to heart health to promote heart healthy activities which can save 6 million lives yearly.
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  2. 2
    054483

    Integrated Programme for Noncommunicable Diseases Prevention and Control (NCD).

    Shigan EN

    WORLD HEALTH STATISTICS QUARTERLY. RAPPORT TRIMESTRIEL DE STATISTIQUES SANITAIRES MONDIALES. 1988; 41(3-4):267-73.

    Because declining mortality from infectious diseases is accompanied by increasing mortality from noncommunicable diseases in both developed and developing countries, the World Health Organization (WHO) has initiated the Integrated Program for Community Health in Noncommunicable Diseases (Interhealth). Interhealth is based on the concepts that 1) noncommunicable diseases are related to a set of risk factors some of which can be controlled; 2) the entire community must be involved; 3) health promotion intervention strategies, such as population control, risk identification, screening and prevention strategies, must be integrated; 4) different categories of intervention (e.g., lifestyle changes, health care reorganization) must be coordinated; 5) social and environmental changes will be necessary; and 6) noncommunicable disease prevention and control strategies will be implemented through existing primary health care systems. The core program of Interhealth addresses heart diseases, stroke, diabetes, cancer, and respiratory diseases from the point of view of their common risk factors: diet, tobacco, physical activity, environment, oral hygiene, blood pressure, lipids, and glucose. The Interhealth program is being developed as a dynamic system, consisting of 4 main activities: experimental testing by means of demonstration projects (of which there are currently 18 in 15 countries); mathematical modeling of disease/risk factor interrelations; training; and research activities. These activities will be supported by organizational, financial and information activities at WHO headquarters and in the WHO Regional Offices.
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  3. 3
    228907

    Changing mortality patterns in men.

    Kesteloot H; Yuan X; Joossens JV

    ACTA CARDIOLOGICA. 1988; 43(2):133-9.

    Age-adjusted mortality trends among men aged 35 to 74 in developed countries are analyzed for the last 35 years using WHO data for seven selected countries. "Mortality from all causes has shown the greatest decrease in Japan and the greatest increase in Hungary. From 1970 on cardiovascular mortality demonstrates a downward trend in all countries, except in Sweden where it remains virtually unchanged and Hungary where it rises markedly. Cancer mortality shows an upward trend which levels off during the last 15 years with the exception of Hungary. Changes in dietary and smoking habits and mass treatment of hypertension offer the most plausible explanation for the observed changes." (EXCERPT)
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